Workshops
A.W. Mellon Workshops

A.W. Mellon Workshops

Now in their thirteenth year, the Center’s A.W. Mellon Foundation workshops are working groups centered on an interdisciplinary topic drawn from any period, field, or method of research in the humanities. The workshops provide an opportunity for students and faculty to think together outside of the classroom.

In 2009, the Mellon Foundation awarded the Center for the Humanities a $125,000 grant to continue these interdisciplinary workshops in the humanities for five more years beginning in 2010-2011. The A.W. Mellon workshops are one of the Center’s most exciting programs, and have led to conferences, books, and teaching innovations. Recent and current workshops include topics on diverse subjects such as Comics, Immaterial Labor and the University in Crisis, and Science and Print Culture.

The Center for the Humanities is pleased to announce the 2013-14 Mellon Workshop lineup, which features three new and three returning workshops. The application process for the 2014-15 academic year is now closed. The 2014-15 will be announced soon. More information here.

2013-2014 Mellon Workshops Announced

The Center for the Humanities is pleased to announce the 2013-14 Mellon Workshop lineup, which features three new (Art and Scholarship, in Theory and in Practice; Comics; and Guilt) and three returning (Labor and the University in Crisis; New Media and the Global South; and T3: Translation and Transformation: Transfer Processes across Languages, Media, and Cultures) workshops.
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Art and Scholarship, in Theory and Practice

This workshop focuses on artistic production and scholarly research as sites of potential rejuvenation for scholarship in the humanities. Taking cues from a range of artists and theorists, this workshop takes up “making things” broadly, and wants to gather others to think through what practices go into creation: the creation of research projects, paintings, lectures, performances, dissertations, dances, and lives.
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Comics

Comics have long been an important part of popular culture in many areas of the world, and over the last few decades they have become increasingly important in academia as well. The A. W. Mellon Comics Workshop takes a transdisciplinary approach to the study of comics and its aim is to yield rich, new understandings of comics. Our meetings center around shared primary and theoretical readings about comics (posted on our website) and around talks given by comics artists, political cartoonists, industry experts, and researchers and scholars who study comics.
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Guilt

Guilt is an emotion humans experience and a topic that is at the core of many fact-based or fictitious narratives of human agency. In this workshop faculty, staff, and students from the humanities and the sciences will assess and dismantle the concept of guilt and its theoretical foundations.
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Immaterial Labor and the University in Crisis

This workshop explores emerging currents within scholarship and political organizing that call into question the neoliberalization of the university and explore its alternatives. Our aim is to engage contemporary theoretical interventions alongside the voices from popular struggle. We seek a cross-campus conversation that is mindful , for example, of the perspectives of the students involved in the 2010-11 University of Puerto Rico strikes, who, recalling the work of Jacques Derrida, sought a Universidad sin condición (“university without condition”) and who further remind us that universities are sites where ‘high’ theory and grassroots praxis inform each other regularly.
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New Media and Mass/Popular Culture in the Global South

Forms of mass popular culture shape the daily lives of the majority of the world’s citizens. Television, popular music, video and film, and the Internet are powerful forces of cultural cohesion, sources of local narratives of identity, subjectivity, and community, and enable connections across national boundaries and between continents. This research group will focus on the many cultural forms that are produced in parts of the world that are often considered “peripheral” in dominant narratives of globalization and post-modernity, and the ways they imagine themselves as part of a larger global community and political economy, especially through modern technological platforms.
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Translation and Transformation: Transfer Processes across Languages, Media, and Culture

Translation – Transposition – Transfer – Transformation: these terms overlap without being synonymous, and the relationships among them provide a substratum for the individual meetings of this workshop. They designate processes among languages, discourses, forms of knowledge, cultures, and media that collectively help shape and define such broad concepts as transnationality and globalism, but also artistic and sensory forms of intermediality. Not least, they can crucially determine the “fine grain” of textual form.
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World Literature/s Research

The World Literature/s Research Workshop aims to identify and explore the distinctions, implications, and the tensions underlying the conceptualization of "World Literature/s" - in singularity and plurality. Along with promoting new research in the field through a dialogue across departments of literature, the workshop seeks to facilitate pedagogical innovations in both graduate and undergraduate curricula at UW-Madison.
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