Workshops
A.W. Mellon Workshops

A.W. Mellon Workshops

Now in their fourteenth year, the Center’s A.W. Mellon Foundation workshops are working groups centered on an interdisciplinary topic drawn from any period, field, or method of research in the humanities. The workshops provide an opportunity for students and faculty to think together outside of the classroom.

In 2009, the Mellon Foundation awarded the Center for the Humanities a $125,000 grant to continue these interdisciplinary workshops in the humanities for five more years beginning in 2010-2011. The A.W. Mellon workshops are one of the Center’s most exciting programs, and have led to conferences, books, and teaching innovations. Recent and current workshops include topics on diverse subjects such as Comics, Immaterial Labor and the University in Crisis, and Science and Print Culture.

The Center for the Humanities is pleased to announce the 2014-15 Mellon Workshop lineup, which features five new and three returning workshops. The application process for the 2014-15 academic year is now closed. More information here.

2014-2015 Mellon Workshops Announced

The Center for the Humanities is pleased to announce the 2014-15 Mellon Workshop lineup, which features five new (Ancient Republics and Republicanism; Digital Humanities Research Network; Disability Studies; Financial Stability and the Public Good University in the 21st Century; and Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages) and three returning (Art and Scholarship: Collaboratory; Disciplining Comics; and Immaterial Labor and the University in Crisis) workshops.
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Ancient Republics: An International Workshop

“Republicanism” has become an increasingly important area of inquiry for a variety of academic fields, but what do we exactly mean when we speak of the ancient “republic”? This series of international workshops seeks to establish a basis for investigation into this question by pursuing ancient republics of the Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds, republicanism, and the “political sphere” (res publica) from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including classics, history, material culture, philosophy, and political theory.
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Art and Scholarship, in Theory and Practice

This workshop focuses on artistic production and scholarly research as sites of potential rejuvenation for scholarship in the humanities. Taking cues from a range of artists and theorists, this workshop takes up “making things” broadly, and wants to gather others to think through what practices go into creation: the creation of research projects, paintings, lectures, performances, dissertations, dances, and lives.
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Comics

Comics have long been an important part of popular culture in many areas of the world, and over the last few decades they have become increasingly important in academia as well. The A. W. Mellon Comics Workshop takes a transdisciplinary approach to the study of comics and its aim is to yield rich, new understandings of comics. Our meetings center around shared primary and theoretical readings about comics (posted on our website) and around talks given by comics artists, political cartoonists, industry experts, and researchers and scholars who study comics.
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Digital Humanities Research Network

The Digital Humanities Research Network will explore the processes involved in digitizing, quantifying, and visualizing different types of humanities objects turned data (including printed books, manuscripts, historical records, art, music, films). In addition to opening up new research questions, our group will provide an opportunity for a sustained conversation across campus about the computational and analytical aspects of the digital humanities.
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Disability Studies

Building on the growing interest in, and development of, scholarship related to disability at UW-Madison, our workshop links the important work and conversations of both disability studies in the humanities and disability activism across various communities. Through these conversations, our workshop seeks to explore and deepen connections between activist and academic engagement with disability. We contend, moreover, that these two orientations to disability are not separate worlds, but rather two overlapping, mutually generative means of engaging with disability.
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Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

The popular conception of the medieval world is often one of insularity and isolation, but nothing could be further from the truth. Pilgrims, princes, crusaders, doctors, merchants, monks, and artists—all these knew that the world they lived in was a vast and far-flung network of persons, places and things. Traces of frequent and ongoing cross-cultural encounter in the Middle Ages abound: in encyclopedias, chronicles, and universal histories; in treatises of science and medicine; in literary texts; in works of art and architecture; and of course in maps and travel narratives of many kinds. Indeed, even as we speak with increasing frequency about our current moment as an era of globalization, the Middle Ages—roughly the thousand years between c. 500-1500—have themselves never seemed more urgently global.
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Immaterial Labor and the University in Crisis

This workshop explores emerging currents within scholarship and political organizing that call into question the neoliberalization of the university and explore its alternatives. Our aim is to engage contemporary theoretical interventions alongside the voices from popular struggle. We seek a cross-campus conversation that is mindful , for example, of the perspectives of the students involved in the 2010-11 University of Puerto Rico strikes, who, recalling the work of Jacques Derrida, sought a Universidad sin condición (“university without condition”) and who further remind us that universities are sites where ‘high’ theory and grassroots praxis inform each other regularly.
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Financial Stability and the Public Good University in the 21st Century

The aim of this initiative is to provide a group of current University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty, staff, and graduate students an opportunity to think through the issues at stake as public higher education institutions seek simultaneously to advance a market-oriented income-generation agenda and maintain an institutional profile consistent with a commitment to the public good.
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World Literature/s Research

The World Literature/s Research Workshop aims to identify and explore the distinctions, implications, and the tensions underlying the conceptualization of "World Literature/s" - in singularity and plurality. Along with promoting new research in the field through a dialogue across departments of literature, the workshop seeks to facilitate pedagogical innovations in both graduate and undergraduate curricula at UW-Madison.
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