Seminars
Scholars in Residence

Scholars in Residence

The Scholars-in-Residence program brings to UW-Madison’s campus renowned thinkers whose cross-disciplinary work is in the vanguard of the humanities. During their time on campus, Scholars-in-Residence give public lectures, meet with faculty and students, participate in colloquia, and teach graduate seminars. These visits promise to intensify and internationalize intellectual life--on campus and in Madison. The support of the Distinguished International Visitors Fund, Mellon Disciplinary Crossing, and the Jay C. and Ruth Halls Visiting Scholar Fund make the Scholars-in-Residence program possible.

Spring 2011: Jacques Rancière

Jacques Rancière is widely regarded as one of Europe’s foremost contemporary intellectuals. His recent work, which has influenced scholars and artists alike, examines the relationships between aesthetics and politics. Interested in the questions of democracy, equality, and emancipation, his work insists that aesthetics is not an autonomous discourse. Ranciere taught at the University of Paris VIII, France, from 1969 to 2000, occupying the Chair of Aesthetics and Politics from 1990 until his retirement.
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Spring 2011: Catherine Malabou

Catherine Malabou returned to UW-Madison to continue the conversation generated by her exciting 2010 Humanities Without Boundaries Lecture, “Is Plasticity a New Name for Freedom?” Working at the intersections of philosophy and neuroscience, Malabou takes up Hegel’s concept of “plasticity” – a term that suggests both openness and resistance – to forge connections between dialectics and deconstruction. Her work transforms continental philosophy as it reconceives the meaning of the political and the religious and rethinks the relationship between the brain and the world.
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Fall 2010: Jacqueline Rose

Jacqueline Rose initially garnered attention for her groundbreaking work on psychoanalysis, feminism, and literature. Writing on Christina Rossetti, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton in On Not Being Able to Sleep, and film theory – among other things - in Sexuality in the Field of Vision, she has shaped the way we think about subjectivity, sexual difference, and fantasy.
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