Research
Scholars in Residence

Scholars in Residence

The Scholars-in-Residence program brings to UW-Madison’s campus renowned thinkers whose cross-disciplinary work is in the vanguard of the humanities. During their time on campus, Scholars-in-Residence give public lectures, meet with faculty and students, participate in colloquia, and teach graduate seminars. These visits promise to intensify and internationalize intellectual life—on campus and in Madison. The support of the Distinguished International Visitors Fund, the A. W. Mellon Foundation, and the Jay C. and Ruth Halls Visiting Scholar Fund make the Scholars-in-Residence program possible.

Fall 2016: Shamus Kahn

Shamus Khan is Associate Professor of Sociology at Columbia University, where he is the director of the graduate program. He writes on culture, inequality, and elites. He is the author of Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul’s School (Princeton), The Practice of Research (Oxford, with Dana Fisher), the forthcoming Exceptional: The Astors, the New York Elite, and the story of American Inequality (Princeton) and Approaches to Ethnography: Modes of Representation and Analysis in Participant Observation (Oxford). He directs the working group on the political influence of economic elites at the Russell Sage Foundation, is the series editor of “The Middle Range” at Columbia University Press, and the editor of the journal Public Culture.
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Fall 2016: Ciraj Rassool

Ciraj Rassool, Ph.D is professor of history and director of the African Programme in Museum and Heritage Studies at the University of the Western Cape. He was the chairperson of the District Six Museum and council chairperson of Iziko Museums of South Africa, and was also on the councils of the National Heritage Council and the South African Heritage Resources Agency. He is a board member of the South African History Archive, and is also a member of the Human Remains Advisory Committee of the Minister of Arts and Culture, South Africa.
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Spring 2016: Christophe Bonneuil

Christophe Bonneuil is a senior researcher in History of Science, Science Studies, and Environmental History at the Centre Alexandre Koyré (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) and teaches at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. His research explores the co-evolution of ways of knowing and ways of governing nature and the Earth. He has recently published a global environmental history of the Anthropocene (The Shock of the Anthropocene: The Earth, History and Us, Verso, 2016 [2013 in french], with J-B. Fressoz) and edited The Anthropocene and the Global Environmental Crisis: Rethinking Modernity in a New Epoch, (Routledge, 2015, with C. Hamilton and F. Gemenne).
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Fall 2015: Jeannie Suk

Jeannie Suk is Professor of Law at Harvard Law School where she has taught criminal law and procedure, family law, and the law of art, fashion, and the performing arts. Before joining the faculty in 2006, she served as a law clerk to Justice David Souter on the United States Supreme Court, and to Judge Harry Edwards on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. She was educated at Yale (B.A. 1995) and at Oxford (D.Phil 1999) where she was a Marshall Scholar, and is a graduate of Harvard Law School (J.D. 2002).
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Spring 2015: Frédéric Neyrat

Frédéric Neyrat is a French philosopher who works on the philosophy of politics, the theory of images, and psychoanalysis.
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Spring 2015: Debjani Ganguly

Debjani Ganguly is director of the Humanities Research Centre and associate professor of literature at the Australian National University. Her areas of research include the contemporary Anglophone novel, literary forms in the new media age, postcolonial approaches to caste and dalit studies, Indian literatures in Hindi, Marathi and Bengali, language worlds in colonial/postcolonial South Asia, and Indian Ocean literary worlds from 1750-1950.
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Spring 2015: Julia Lupton

Julia Reinhard Lupton is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine with a joint appointment in Education, and also serves as Associate Dean of Research for the School of Humanities. She is director of UCI’s Humanities Commons and also director of Illuminations: The Chancellor’s Arts and Culture Initiative.
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Spring 2011: Jacques Rancière

Jacques Rancière is widely regarded as one of Europe’s foremost contemporary intellectuals. His recent work, which has influenced scholars and artists alike, examines the relationships between aesthetics and politics. Interested in the questions of democracy, equality, and emancipation, his work insists that aesthetics is not an autonomous discourse. Ranciere taught at the University of Paris VIII, France, from 1969 to 2000, occupying the Chair of Aesthetics and Politics from 1990 until his retirement.
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Spring 2011: Catherine Malabou

Catherine Malabou returned to UW-Madison to continue the conversation generated by her exciting 2010 Humanities Without Boundaries Lecture, “Is Plasticity a New Name for Freedom?” Working at the intersections of philosophy and neuroscience, Malabou takes up Hegel’s concept of “plasticity” – a term that suggests both openness and resistance – to forge connections between dialectics and deconstruction. Her work transforms continental philosophy as it reconceives the meaning of the political and the religious and rethinks the relationship between the brain and the world.
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Fall 2010: Jacqueline Rose

Jacqueline Rose initially garnered attention for her groundbreaking work on psychoanalysis, feminism, and literature. Writing on Christina Rossetti, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton in On Not Being Able to Sleep, and film theory – among other things - in Sexuality in the Field of Vision, she has shaped the way we think about subjectivity, sexual difference, and fantasy.
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