Research
Faculty Development Seminars

Faculty Development Seminars

Designed to enhance the quality of humanities research at UW-Madison and to promote sustained collaboration and dialogue across disciplinary lines, the Center for the Humanities and Institute for Research in the Humanities (with major support from the Office of the Dean of the College of Letters & Science) inaugurated Faculty Development Seminars in the Humanities in the spring of 2007.

The Faculty Development Seminars in the Humanities enable an individual tenured faculty member or a team of two tenured faculty members to lead a seminar on a topic of broad interest across the humanities. The seminar leaders receive a course release for directing a seminar of other faculty members who meet ten times during a semester in two-hour sessions. Their department will receive funds for a replacement lecturer. The Faculty Development Seminar program provides research funds of $500 for ten faculty members to participate in the seminar. Seminar leaders and participants will be chosen by a selection committee. The Center for the Humanities and the Institute for Research in the Humanities sponsor and administer the Faculty Development Seminar.

Spring 2017: Disability Studies in the Humanities


More information More

Call for Participation (Faculty Members)

Call for faculty participation in the upcoming Faculty Development Seminar. Deadlines apply to full consideration for a stipend, but additional inquiries may be submitted up to the beginning of each semester.
More information More

Call for Proposals: Lead Faculty for 2017-2018 Seminars

The Faculty Development Seminars in the Humanities enable an individual tenured faculty member or a team of two tenured faculty members to lead a seminar on a topic of broad interest across the humanities. The seminar leaders receive a one-course release for directing a seminar of other faculty members.
More information More

Past Faculty Development Seminars

Beginning in 2007, Faculty Development Seminars in the Humanities have ranged in topics, from policies for international governance to theories of visuality, from prolonged study of Ovid to the proper aims of higher education.
More information More