Past Workshops

Terra Incognita Art Series 2016-17

Contact: terra.incognita.art@gmail.com

Coordinators: Alexandra Lakind (Nelson Institute & School of Education), Rob Lundberg (Nelson Institute & Law School), Helen J. Bullard (Art Department), Sarah Stankey (Art Department), Sarah FitzSimons (Art Department), Katarzyna Olga Beilin (Spanish & Portuguese).

This artist-led workshop and event series showcases a range of expressions that explore the relationships between humans and the world they inhabit. Our mission is twofold: 1) through the arts and humanities, to investigate environmental issues honoring the experiences, aesthetics, and struggles embedded in these topics, and 2) bring people together with diverse, but interconnected, interests and identities. As we face a new epoch of environmental complexity, we need to encourage multidisciplinarity, a broader approach to environmental studies and the arts, and supportive learning communities.

2017-18 Fall Series

(More detail about individual events can be found below)
 

October 7–Christa Donner & Andrew Yang: Ecological Storytelling: Imaginative Experiments for All Ages. Bubbler @ Madison Public Library–1:00-3:00pm

November 3–Nestle: Bird Songs. Fredric March Play Circle Memorial Union–7:00pm

November 30–Nina Elder: An Artistic Approach to Non-Linear Research. 8411 Sewell Social Science–12:30-2:00pm

December/January – Installation by Nick Lally in the Leopold Hall Greenhouse

Terra Incognita Art Series workshops, meetings, and events can be found in the Borghesi-Mellon Workshops Calendar.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Arts Institute; Center for Culture, History and Environment; Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; The Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office; Leopold Hall GreenHouse Learning Community.

To join our mailing list, send a message to terra.incognita.art@gmail.com

Ecological Storytelling: Imaginative Experiments for All Ages

Christa Donner & Andrew Yang  

Saturday, October 7, 2017 @ 1:00-3:00pm Bubbler @ Madison Public Library, 201 W Mifflin St

Ecological Storytelling: Imaginative Experiments for All Ages is a special workshop by artists Christa Donner and Andrew Yang. Join us (and bring your family and friends) to this hands-on experience exploring unexpected connections between the things in your everyday life and our world - natural, artificial, cultural, and imaginable. Participants of all ages will work together to explore the ecological webs that connect through our lives. Through open-ended prompts, participants will collaboratively devise stories from a blend of drawing, collage, and game playing to spark inter-generational conversation and ecological thinking. In this time of environmental complexity, we need new ways of telling stories that connect us to each other and to our futures, pasts, and present environment. This playful approach to ecological narratives involves the complex, non-linear, and indeterminate. Let’s make art together to invent new relations and new ways of learning!

Christa Donner and Andrew Yang: Christa Donner and Andrew Yang are transdisciplinary artists who work both separately and together. Yang has a PhD from Duke University and has publications in LeonardoCurrent Biology; Interdisciplinary Science Reviews; Evolution & Development; Biological Theory; International Studies in the Philosophy of Science; Insectes Sociaux; Liberal Education; Gastronomica. Yang works across the interweaving of the naturalcultural. Donner’s studio practice moves between material & social exchange linking the human/animal body to the world we inhabit. Donner is also the founder of Cultural ReProducers: a creative platform, web resource, and community-based project made up of an evolving group of active cultural workers (professional artists, designers, curators, musicians, performers, writers, etc) who are also parents. Donner and Yang have created projects for BankArt NYK in Yokohama, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Gallery 400 in Chicago, SPACES in Cleveland, and Tue Greenfort's The Worldly House at dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, Germany. Both teach at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

To register for this event, check out madisonbubbler.org or click here for the Madison Public Library calendar and registration for events.   

This event is free and open to the public. 

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

To join our mailing list, send a message to terra.incognita.art@gmail.com

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Bubbler @ Madison Public Library; Arts Institute; Center for Culture, History and Environment; Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies.

Bird Songs

Nestle 
Musical Ensemble

Friday, November 3, 2017 @ 7:00pm doors Fredric March Play Circle Memorial, 800 Langdon St.

Bird Songs is a new piece commissioned by the Greater Madison Jazz Consortium and presented as part of their inDIGenous Jazz concert series. Nestle will be sharing the evening with Lovely Socialite, who will also perform new commissioned music. Bird Songs draws on recordings from Cornell University Ornithology Labs archive to create new compositions and improvisational structures inspired by and in conversation with these field recordings.

Nestle:

The Nestle trio exists in performance.
The Nestle trio is listening.
The Nestle trio is a realization of visions.
The Nestle trio is an expression of being through doing.

The Nestle trio of Robert Lundberg, Ryan Packard, and Cyrus Pireh respectively assemble an instrumentation of double bass and electronics; percussion, accordion, and electronics; and 9-string electric future lute to execute this performance.

To live and thrive in the current situation invokes a certain music: A music that is the result of doing. A music that is the result of people. A music that exists as proof of existence.

This event is free and open to the public, seating is first come first serve. For more information check out Greater Madison Jazz Consortium at http://www.jazzinmadison.org/.

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

To join our mailing list, send a message to terra.incognita.art@gmail.com

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Greater Madison Jazz Consortium; Arts Institute; Center for Culture, History and Environment; Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies.

An Artistic Approach to Non-Linear Research

Nina Elder

Thursday, November 30, 2017 @ 12:30-2:00pm 8411 Sewell Social Science, 1180 Observatory Drive.

An Artistic Approach to Non-Linear Research will be presented as part of the Holtz Center for Science & Technology Studies brownbag series. Artist Nina Elder will present on her travels to some of the most environmentally impacted, geographically distant, and economically important places on the globe where she researches how the natural environment is changing through human-centered activities. Through these journeys that have been focused on Alaska and Western Canada she gathers stories, images, ideas, and correlations to form an evolving narrative presentation. This presentation is equal parts travel log, artist talk, poetic narrative, and a scrutiny of assumptions about the North. It weaves together unlikely associations between piles of rocks, Nina’s father’s untold military history, climate change, Native cultures, obsolete communication technology, and the need for curiosity. This work has been supported by the Anchorage Museum, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Alaska Humanities Forum, the Klondike Institute for Arts and Culture, and the Pollock Krasner Foundation.

Nina Elder: is an artist, adventurer, and arts administrator. She examines historic land use and its cycles of production, consumption, and waste.  Her meticulous drawings explore the aesthetics of industrial, scientific, and military sites. Through research, workshops, exhibitions, and curated excursions, Nina illuminates that the contemporary landscape is the physical manifestation of modern needs, economies, policies, and powers. Rooted in years of facilitating interdisciplinary creative projects, Nina’s work promotes curiosity, exploration, and collective sense of stewardship. Nina is an advocate for collaborations between artists, scientists, and communities, and has produced projects with organizations around the country including Grinnell College, the Tamarind Institute, the Harvard Forest, and the Anchorage Museum. With an MFA in Painting from the San Francisco Art Institute, Nina’s work has been exhibited and collected nationally, and has been included in publications such as Art in America, VICE Magazine, and New American Paintings. Her work has been recognized with the Rauschenberg Award for Arts and Activism as well as a Pollock Krasner Foundation grant.

This event is free and open to the public.

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

To join our mailing list, send a message to terra.incognita.art@gmail.com.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; Arts Institute; Center for Culture, History and Environment; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office.