Past Workshops
Science and Print Culture

Science and Print Culture

Both coeval with and perhaps essential to the development of modern science, the history of print culture offers a significant humanist perspective on the history of scientific practices and provides an important context for examining the historical relations between C.P. Snow's 'two cultures'. This workshop will pursue related themes in the area of science and print culture from the early to the middle modern era, with an emphasis on exploring practices of producing and reading scientific texts in print, as well as on kinds of scientific publication, especially the scientific periodical and other forms of serialized publication. As a forum for promoting interdisciplinary conversation among graduate students, faculty, and other scholars of literature, history, history of science, history of medicine,communications, and information access, our monthly meetings will include guest lecturers and discussion of pre-circulated readings.

EVENTS

Ulrike Strasser

Associate Professor of History and Affiliate Faculty in Women's Studies and Religious Studies
University of California, Irvine

Text, Image, Knowledge in a German Jesuit Journal or the Case of Joseph Stöcklein's Neuer Welt-Bott

Thursday, May 3, 2012 @ 3:30 pm
984 Memorial Library

The talk explores how Germany’s premier eighteenth-century missionary journal, the Neue Welt-Bott (or New World Messenger) constructed contemporary scientific knowledge and a view of the European colonial order for a broader public. It pays particular attention to the complex multimedia arrangement that founding editor Joseph Stöcklein created in transforming a wealth of handwritten, incommensurable information from German Jesuits abroad into a homogeneous, replicable print product for German readers back home.

Directions: From the 1st floor of Memorial Library, take the elevator marked ‘South Stacks and Special Collections’ (located to the right of the three elevators that serve most of the building) to the 9th floor. Visitors who are not members of the university should inform the front desk that they are attending the Mellon Science & Print Culture Workshop and show a form of ID to receive a day pass.

Cosponsored by the Department of German, UW-Madison.

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A Concert performed by Eliza's Toyes

Kircher's Rome: Music in the 17th-century Collegio Romano

December 1, 2011 @ 4:30 pm
Memorial Library, Special Collections (984)

This program reflects vocal and instrumental music one might have heard in the Society of Jesus' college in seventeenth-century Rome. Professor of mathematics at the Collegio Romano and polymath, Athanasius Kircher mentioned these composers in his Musurgia Universalis (1650), a monumental encyclopedia of musical history, theory, and practice. The concert takes place in the exhibit area of Special Collections on the 9th floor of Memorial Library, where the current exhibit, "Jesuits and the Construction of Knowledge, 1540-1773," highlights (among other topics) Jesuit interest in musical theory and practice and includes a copy of Kircher's Musurgia (1650).

Program:
Ecce sic benedicetur by Christóbal Morales (1500-1553)
Dunque con stile by Giovanni Girolamo Kapsperger (1580-1651)
In lectulo meo per noctes from Kircher's Musurgia Universalis (1650)
Historia di Jephte by Giacomo Carissimi (1605-1674)

Performers:
Katherine Peck, soprano
Chelsie Propst, soprano
Sandy Erickson, alto/recorder
Steve Johnson, tenor
Ben Li, baritone
Jerry Hui, bass/recorder
Doug Towne, theorbo
Theresa Koenig, dulcian/bassoon
Andrea Kleesattel, cello
with faculty guest Paul Rowe, baritone

For more information about Eliza's Toyes, see http://www.toyes.info/.

This program is part of the A.W. Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at UW-Madison with support from the A.W. Mellon Foundation. Cosponsored by the School of Music, UW-Madison.

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J. Michelle Molina

Department of Religious Studies, Northwestern University

Circulations: Jesuit Heart and Science in the Eighteenth-Century Catholic Atlantic World

November 11, 2011 @ 12:00 pm
Room 126 Memorial Library

EXHIBIT

As missionaries, scholars, teachers, authors, and members of learned academies, members of the Society of Jesus exerted great influence on the world of early modern European learning. The current exhibit in Special Collections (976 Memorial Library), "Jesuits and the Construction of Knowledge, 1540-1773," further explores the wide scope of Jesuit contributions to scholarship in fields from astronomy and natural philosophy to history and cartography. The exhibit is open Monday through Friday, 9:00 am-5:00 pm.

J. Michelle Molina is the John W. Croghan Assistant Professor in Catholic Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at Northwestern University. Her research interests include the intersection of devotional practices and anatomical concepts, female sanctity and women's spiritual practices, and the impact that the Ignatian Spiritual Exercises - a Jesuit program of radical self-reflexivity - had on the formation of selves in early modern Europe and colonial Mexico.

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Nick Wilding

Department of History, Georgia State University

Angels and cyborgs: Socio-epistemologies of early modern Jesuit astronomy

October 24, 2011 @ 3:30 pm
Memorial Library, Special Collections (984)

Galileo's Sidereus Nuncius (1610) deployed and depicted astronomical telescopy as a solitary practice whose success and future depended more on individual virtue, instrumental quality and innovation rather than social organization, geographical distribution and history.  In this, he rejected rival programs that insisted on site-specific long-term observation and attempted to render their technologies obsolete.  While his attempt to control discovery paid off in the short term, it also left him increasingly isolated from potential allies, especially the Jesuits, who incorporated the telescope into global observation networks.  This paper approaches the history of astronomical observation by analysing the ideals and realities of alternative socio-epistemologies over the first half of the seventeenth century.

This program is part of the A.W. Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at UW-Madison with support from the A.W. Mellon Foundation. Cosponsored by the Department of History of Science.

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Susan E. Lederer

Robert Turell Professor of History of Medicine and Bioethics abd Chair, Medical History and Bioethics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

'Fun in Bed': entertaining the convalescent in early 20th-century America

September 29, 2011 @ 4:30 pm
Memorial Library, Special Collections (984)

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Dayle B. DeLancey

Assistant Professor, Department of Medical History and Bioethics (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Vaccinating Freedom: Smallpox Prevention and Citizenship in African-American Print Culture, 1820-1865

March 23, 2011 @ 4:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Focusing upon Black Philadelphians, who then comprised one of the northern U.S.'s largest and most culturally significant African-American enclaves, this presentation explores the ways in which antebellum and Civil War-era African-American print culture combined the promotion of smallpox vaccination with contemporary ideals of 'fitness for freedom' and full citizenship.

This program is part of the A.W. Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at UW-Madison with support from the A.W. Mellon Foundation and the College of Letters and Science.  Co-sponsored by the Center for the History of Print Culture.

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Kellie Robertson

Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Master Chaucer and Old, Dull Aristotle: Printing Poetry and Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England

March 3, 2011 @ 4:30 pm
Memorial Library, Special Collections (984)

Chaucer's contemporaries regularly recognized him as the heir to Aristotle's natural philosophy, the body of scientific knowledge that today we would equate with "physics." This lecture looks briefly at the confluence of fiction and physics in manuscript culture in order to ask what happens to it in early print culture, where the rise of Chaucer's fortunes as the "father of English poetry," found an inverse correlate in Aristotle's vernacular reputation as a natural philosopher. This illustrated lecture traces the consolidation of Chaucer's literary reputation as a phenomenon worked out against a nascent literary criticism where 'Aristotle' came to name (in English at least) the author of the Politics and Ethics rather than the author of the university science curriculum. Modern disciplinary divisions continue to foster this "de-natured" view of Chaucer, obscuring the extent to which medieval natural philosophy and poetry influenced one another both in manuscript and, later, in print.

This program is part of the A.W. Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at UW-Madison with support from the A.W. Mellon Foundation and the College of Letters and Science.  Co-sponsored by the Center for the History of Print Culture.

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Adam R. Shapiro

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Medical History & Bioethics (UW-Madison)

Science and textbook culture: Looking beyond training and popularization

December 8, 2010 @ 4:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Among historians of science, most discussion of textbooks as objects of study falls into two broad categories: as tools used to recruit and train new scientists or as a subgenre of books engaged in science popularization. Often textbooks are brought into such discussions with presumptions about their authority, objectivity, and consumption. In this talk I use the example of American high school biology textbooks of the early twentieth century to argue that textbooks are more than simply tools-for-training and/or books-for-popularization.

This program is part of the A.W. Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at UW-Madison with support from the A.W. Mellon Foundation and the College of Letters and Science.

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Meghan Doherty

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/ACLS Early Career Fellow and Honorary Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Visual Cultures, University of Madison-Wisconsin

Discovering the 'true form:' Hooke's Micrographia and the Visual Vocabulary of Engraved Portraits

November 16, 2010 @ 4:00 pm
Memorial Library, Special Collections (984)

As part of a larger project on the accuracy and the visual culture of the early Royal Society, "Discovering the 'true form'" investigates how a semblance to a recognizable visual idiom produces images that pass for "accurate" by studying the illustrations in Robert Hooke's Micrographia (1665) and shows that the visual culture of microscopy is dependent upon the visual culture of portrait engraving.

This program is part of the A.W. Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at UW-Madison with support from the A.W. Mellon Foundation and the College of Letters and Science.  Co-sponsored by the Department of Art History and the Center for Visual Cultures.

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Ronald Numbers

Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine, UW-Madison

Alternative science & the occult in print culture: From the holdings of Special Collections

October 26, 2010 @ 7:30 pm
984 Memorial Library

This session in Special Collections (984 Memorial Library) affords us the opportunity to examine 19th- and 20th-century titles from the Science and Religion Collection (gift of Prof. Numbers) and the Schadewald Collection on Pseudo-Science, as well as early printed books of secrets and treatises on the philosopher's stone from the Duveen Alchemy and Chemistry Collection. Hilldale Professor of the History of Science and Medicine and a member of the departments of Medical History & Bioethics and History of Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor Ronald Numbers will speak on some highlights in these collections as a way of introducing us to the print cultures of alternative and occult science. For location and directions, see http://specialcollections.library.wisc.edu/location.html.

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Mellon/White Science & Print Culture Workshop

September 21, 2010 @ 3:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Please join the Mellon/White Science & Print Culture Workshop for its introductory meeting on Tuesday, September 21 at 3:00 pm in SLIS Commons (4207 Helen C. White).  We'll be discussing "Pharmaceutical Piracy and the Origins of Medical Patenting," a chapter from Adrian Johns' new book: Piracy: the intellectual property wars from Gutenberg to Gates (Chicago, 2009).  A historian of science and historian of the book, Johns is giving the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture's Annual Lecture the following week on Wednesday, September 29 at 5:30 pm (SLIS Library/4191 Helen C. White Hall).

For a copy of the reading, please email Florence Hsia at <fchsia@wisc.edu>.  For more information on Johns' Print Culture Annual Lecture, "How Readers became Poachers: Modern Media and the Sciences of Reception," click on <http://www.slis.wisc.edu/386.htm>.

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Robin Valenza

Associate Professor, Department of English, UW-Madison

The Division of Labours: Midwifery's Influence on Adam Smith

April 29, 2010 @ 4:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Robin Valenza will discuss her paper, "The Division of Labours: Midwifery's Influence on Adam Smith," in which she argues that eighteenth-century midwifery influenced Adam Smith's famous thesis in The Wealth of Nations.

Robin Valenza is an associate professor in the English Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her first book, Literature, Language, and the Rise of the Intellectual Disciplines in Britain, 1680-1820, was published last year by Cambridge University Press. Her current work utilizes both traditional modes of close reading as well as digital tools to construct a theory of description for the literature of the long eighteenth century.

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Cheryl Knott Malone

Associate Professor, School of Information Resources & Library Science

'Pluck[ing] the Fruits of Science without Harming the Tree of Life': The Use of Scientific Research in Stewart L. Udall's The Quiet Crisis

April 7, 2010 @ 3:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Stewart Lee Udall, Secretary of the Interior under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, in 1963 published The Quiet Crisis, a book that provided a history of the American conservation movement, discussed the degradation of the nation's natural resources, and called for more responsible stewardship in the future. It became a New York Times bestseller widely reviewed in the popular press and in scientific journals. Twenty-five years later Udall updated the first edition with eight additional chapters. In his introduction to the new edition, Udall expressed regret and embarrassment for asserting in the first edition's penultimate chapter his belief in the power of science and technology as positive forces for resource conservation. That chapter, titled "Conservation and the Future," relied on seven reports published in 1962 by the Committee on  Natural Resources of the National Research Council-National Academy of Sciences at President Kennedy's request and on a massive independent study produced by the Resources for the Future think tank.  In an effort to begin to understand the network of print that influenced environmental policy of the 1960s, this paper evaluates the ways in which Udall interpreted and used the information in these publications to write about what he called "the myth of scientific supremacy."

Cheryl Knott Malone is an associate professor in the School of Information Resources and Library Science at the University of Arizona. Her most recent research focuses on the print culture of the environmental movement in the U.S. with an emphasis on influential books published during the twentieth century.

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Dayle B. DeLancey

Assistant Professor, Department of Medical History & Bioethics, UW-Madison

Vaccinating Freedom: Smallpox Prevention and Citizenship in African-American Print Culture, 1820-1865

March 11, 2010 @ 4:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Focusing upon Black Philadelphians, who then comprised one of the northern U.S.'s largest and most culturally significant African-American enclaves, this presentation explores the ways in which antebellum and Civil War-era African-American print culture combined the promotion of smallpox vaccination with contemporary ideals of 'fitness for freedom' and full citizenship.

Dayle B. DeLancey, Ph.D. joined the Department of Medical History and Bioethics as an Assistant Professor in October 2009. Previously, she was an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch, having received her Ph.D. and M.Sc. from CHSTM at the University of Manchester (UK) in Autumn 2007 and Autumn 2003, respectively, and her M.A. in English and American Literature from Harvard University in 1994. Her current research explores how African Americans viewed and experienced smallpox vaccination in the 19th and early-20th centuries and smallpox inoculation ('variolation') in the 18th century. This work encapsulates her broader research and teaching interests in the 19th- and 20th-c. history and ethics of African-American health experiences, U.S. public health, medical technologies, the public understanding of medicine, and race and gender in medicine. Explorations of discourse and print culture inform much of her work, a reflection of her earlier research and publication activities in American literature.

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Walt Schalick

Assistant Professor of Medical History, Rehabilitation Medicine, History of Science and Pediatrics

The Three R's in Action: Textual Medicine and Market Control in the Middle Ages

February 10, 2010 @ 4:30 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Knowledge is power.  Prior to the printing press, control of textual knowledge meant control of manuscripts.  Those who could interpret, manipulate and deploy that knowledge had power over others.  From the twelfth to the fourteenth centuries, physicians created a variety of textual technologies for that purpose in the medical marketplaces of western Europe.

Walt Schalick is both a historian of medieval medicine and a practicing pediatrician and rehabilitation physician. He took his M.D. and Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University, completed his residency at Children's Hospital and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, was a Clinical Fellow in Pediatrics and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School, and was assistant professor in the departments of History and Pediatrics at Washington University in St. Louis before arriving at UW-Madison. He has won numerous awards and written extensively in both his academic and clinical areas of interest.

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Daniel Selcer (Duquesne) and Theresa Smith (Harvard)

Facsimile, Indiscernibility, and Images of the Copernican World

November 12, 2009 @ 3:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

A manuscript facsimile necessarily differs from the original it reproduces.  It is nevertheless a literary object in its own right, with the peculiar property of rendering accessible to scholarly scrutiny the often inaccessible ground for the production of a print edition.  What are we to make of a case where multiple facsimiles of the same manuscript differ among themselves?  Between 1944 and 1974 no less than nine facsimiles of the autograph of Copernicus' De revolutionibus were published, a profusion related to the manuscript's current inaccessibility to researchers.  In the early 1970s, Charles Eames took a series of stunning photographs of the manuscript.  The facsimiles and Eames' photos, however, reveal an apparent contradiction: there both is and is not a hole in the manuscript page at the center of Copernicus' emblematic diagram of the heliocentric universe. The stakes of the seemingly trivial empirical question of whether such a hole exists, we argue, involve an interrogation of the material nature of textual production, the staged physicality of scientific inquiry, and the limits of the constitution of literary objects.

Daniel Selcer is an associate professor of philosophy at Duquesne University, where he teaches the history of early modern thought. He has published in Representations, Continental Philosophy Review, and other journals. His Philosophy and the Book: Early Modern Figures of Material Inscription will appear this winter from Continuum Books. Theresa Smith is a paper conservator for Special Collections in the Harvard University Library and has worked at the Fogg Art Museum and the Kupferstichkabinett-Berlin. She is a member of the editorial board of Restaurator and has published in Technè: La science au service de l'histoire de l'art et des civilisations and the American Institute for Conservation's Book and Paper Group Annual.

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Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

Uppsala University

Performative Properties: Wild Animals, Intellectual Property, and the Museum

October 29, 2009 @ 3:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Please join us to hear Eva Hemmungs Wirtén talk about the Victorian fascination with classification and scientific control and its
relationship to the display of wild animals in the natural history museum. By considering wild animals as boundary objects of private and
public ownership and control, Professor Wirtén connects the element of performativity in the new public space of the museum with an emerging culture of intellectual property, which increasingly depends on staging its properties, sometimes through lies, trickery, and fraud. Based on her work in/ Terms of Use: Negotiating the Jungle of the Intellectual Commons/ (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2008), Professor Wirtén will connect the past with the present by discussing what impact the digitization of museum collections has on the intersection of private and public.

Professor Wirtén will also be giving a History of Science brown bag at noon on October 30 (204 Bradley Memorial Building) on "Branding Science: The Intellectual Properties of Marie Curie."

Eva Hemmungs Wirtén is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Library and Information Science in the department of Archival Science, Library and Information Science, Museology, and Associate Professor in Comparative Literature at Uppsala University, Sweden. She is the author of/ No Trespassing: Authorship, Intellectual Property Rights, and the Boundaries of Globalization/ (2004) and/ Terms of Use: Negotiating the Jungle of the Intellectual Commons/ (2008), both University of Toronto Press. During 2009-10 she leads the Swedish part of the EU7th Framework project COUNTER (www.counter2010.org), which considers questions of filesharing, user-generated content, and copyright and also works on a project on translation and copyright. For more on Professor Wirtén's work, see (www.abm.uu.se/evahw).

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Tom Broman

Associate Professor, History of Science and Medical History & Bioethics; Chair, History of Science, UW-Madison

Criticism and the Circulation of News: The Scholarly Press in the Late Seventeenth Century

September 24, 2009 @ 3:00 pm
4246 Helen C. White

Please join the Mellon/White Workshop on Science and Print Culture for a discussion of Professor Tom Broman's paper, "Criticism and the Circulation of News: The Scholarly Press in the Late Seventeenth Century."

Professor Broman is Professor of History of Science and Medical History and Bioethics at UW-Madison and Chair of the History of Science Department. He is interested in the history of early modern science and medicine and has devoted much of his recent research to the origins and early history of the periodical press. His publications include Science and Civil Society, co-edited with Lynn K. Nyhart (Chicago, 2002); "On the Epistemology of Criticism. Science, Criticism and the German Public Sphere, 1760-1800," in Jörg Schönert (ed), Literaturwissenschaft und Wissenschaftsforschung (Tübingen, 2000), 6-26; "The Habermasian Public Sphere and Science in the Enlightenment," History of Science 36 (1998): 123-49; and The Transformation of German Academic Medicine, 1750-1820 (Cambridge, 1996).

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Neil Safier

Assistant professor of History at the University of British Columbia

The Material Map: A Journey through the Worlds of the Carta de la Provincia de Quito (1750)

April 6, 2009 @ 4:00 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Please join us for a discussion with Neil Safier of an eighteenth-century map of the Spanish American province of Quito, from its observational origins in the Andes and the compilatory practices of the Spanish American Creole Pedro Vicente Maldonado, to its cartographic transformations in the Parisian atelier of Jean-Baptiste Bourguignon d'Anville, and its later fortunes in France, Spain, England, and ultimately, Quito itself.

Neil Safier is assistant professor of history at the University of British Columbia. He has published several articles on the cartographic, botanic, narrative, and other dimensions of the cultural encounter between Enlightenment Europe and colonial Brazil and Amazonia, and is the author of Measuring the New World: Enlightenment Science and South America (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008)

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Teaching Forum on Science and Print Culture

March 2, 2009 @ 5:00 pm
6191 Helen C. White

Please join us for a roundtable discussion of pedagogical techniques and classroom experiences in teaching on the intersection of science andprint culture from the early to the middle modern era. Participants include Susan Bernstein, Tom Broman, Florence Hsia, Lynn Nyhart, Robin Rider, and Peter Susalla. Need help finding it? Read about the location and directions.

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Bernard Lightman

Professor of History, York University

Print Culture and the Popularization of Evolution

February 17, 2009 @ 12:30 pm
6191 Helen C. White

Bernard Lightman is Professor of Humanities at York University and editor of Isis, the journal of the History of Science Society. He has published extensively on a wide range of topics concerning science in Victorian Britain, including scientific imagery, gender and science, scientific periodicals, and the relationship between science and religion. His most recent monograph is Victorian popularizers of science: Designing nature for new audiences (University of Chicago Press, 2007). He has also co-edited Figuring it out: Science, gender, and visual culture (Dartmouth College Press, 2006) with Ann Shteir, and Science in the marketplace: Nineteenth-century sites and experiences (University of Chicago Press, 2007) with Aileen Fyfe. Currently he is working on a biography of John Tyndall, and, with the support of the Mellon Foundation and the help of an international team of scholars, he is engaged in obtaining, digitalizing, transcribing, and publishing the collected correspondence of this important Victorian physicist.

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Planning Meeting

December 10, 2008 @ 2:30 pm
4207 Helen C. White

Please join us in planning a teaching forum and other workshop events for the spring semester.

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A Tour of Silver Buckle Press

with Tracy Honn, Director

November 19, 2008 @ 2:30 pm
236 Memorial Library

Please join the Mellon Workshop on Science and Print Culture for a tour of Silver Buckle Press, a working museum of letterpress printing. The Silver Buckle Press collection of books, wood and metal type, presses, and printing equipment is part of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries. The director of Silver Buckle Press, Tracy Honn, will speak briefly about printing history and give demonstrations of typesetting and letterpress printing. Participation is limited, so please email Florence Hsia if you plan on attending.

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Discussion with Greg Downey

October 20, 2008 @ 2:30 pm
4246 Helen C. White

Greg Downey is Associate Professor of Journalism & Mass Communication and Library & Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; he also holds a joint appointment in Geography and is affiliated with History of Science. His most recent book is/ Closed captioning: Subtitling, stenography, and the digital convergence of text with television/ (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008). Professor Greg Downey will lead a discussion of his article, "The librarian and the Univac: Automation and labor at the 1962 Seattle World's Fair," in C. McKercher and V. Mosco, eds.,/ Knowledge workers in the information society/ (Lexington Books, 2007). The reading is available for download on this page. Paper copies are available at the Center for the Humanities, 218 Memorial Library. Abstract: The Univac on the Puget Sound gave 84 librarians throughout a diverse geographical and functional division of labor - in academic libraries, public libraries, school libraries, and corporate libraries - their first concrete example of information automation. How the designers of LIBRARY-21 understood the labor of these librarians, and how these librarians in turn came to understand their place within LIBRARY-21, illustrates that the 'library of future' which evolved over the next 40 years was less of an inevitable and 'scientific' application of technology in the name of efficiency, and more a complicated negotiation between systems designers, information machines, and knowledge professionals.

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First Meeting of the Science and Print Culture Workshop

September 17, 2008 @ 2:30 pm
4246 Helen C. White

The first meeting of the Science and Print Culture workshop is Wednesday, September 17, 2008, at 2:30 PM in 4246 Helen C. White. For our first meeting, we will be discussing chapters 1 and 4 from James Secord's Victorian sensation: the extraordinary publication, reception, and secret authorship of Vestiges of the natural history of creation (Chicago, 2000). The reading is available for download on this page. Paper copies are available at the Center for the Humanities, 218 Memorial Library. James Secord will be giving a public lecture on "The laboratory of print" on Friday, September 12, at 6:00 pm (Memorial Union, Tripp Commons, 2nd floor) as part of the conference, The Culture of Print in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Medicine (STEM), sponsored by the Center for the History of Print Culture. For more information on the conference, go to: http://slisweb.lis.wisc.edu/~printcul/STEMConferencePage.html.