Past Workshops
Accessing the Intersections

Accessing the Intersections: Disability, Race, + Gender

Coordinators: Ellen Samuels (English, Gender & Women's Studies), Jenell Johnson (Communication Arts), Cathy Trueba (McBurney Disability Resource Center), Elisabeth Miller (English), Anna Vitale (English).
Contact: krfox2@wisc.edu

“….How do we make the space to talk honestly and wrenchingly about all the multi-layered systems of injustice that target some of us and privilege others for who we are? The layers are so tangled: gender folds into disability, disability wraps around class, class strains against race, race snarls into sexuality, sexuality hangs onto gender, all of it finally piling into our bodies.”
- Eli Clare, “Digging Deep: Thinking About Privilege”

Accessing the Intersections: disability, race + gender brings together major scholars and artists from the field of disability studies to the UW-Madison campus to present new research and creative works addressing the intersections between dis/ability, race, gender, sexuality and nationhood. Such intersections are increasingly being understood as central to conversations about such broad issues as globalization, human rights, education, reproductive justice, health promotion, economic development, and the environment. Since the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities in 2006, which has now been signed by 147 nations and ratified by nearly 100, disability has emerged as a central concern on the global stage. The UN estimates that there are 650 million persons living with disabilities in the world today, and many studies show that women and girls with disabilities face significantly more difficulties in accessing housing, health, education, vocational training and employment, as well as being more likely to be institutionalized and to experience violence. By bringing together perspectives from many different sides of disability experience, locations in the university, and organizations in the community, Accessing the Intersections will position the University of Wisconsin as a leading voice in a vibrant and expanding conversation about disability rights, representations, and directions for the future.

EVENTS & READINGS

Note: Some readings below are password protected. For the password or other information about the workshop, please contact an organizer.

 

NIRMALA EREVELLES

Professor of Social Foundations of Education at the University of Alabama will be at UW Madison on Thursday, April 18th, and Friday, April 19th.

Friday, April 19th 12:00-1:30 pm

Workshop:

"Accessing the Intersections," a Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop, will meet to discuss "Crippin' Jim Crow: Disability, Dis-Location and the School-to-Prison Pipeline."

This event is wheelchair accessible.
Room 7191, Helen C. White Hall, 600 N. Park St, Madison, WI
Coin-operated metered parking is available in the garage beneath Helen C. White Hall, entrance on Park St.  

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Thursday, April 18th 5:00 pm

Public Lecture:

"Epistemologies of Ignorance" and the Political Anatomy of Disability in Transnational Contexts

This event is wheelchair accessible and features real-time captioning. 
For additional accommodations, please contact krfox2@wisc.edu by April 12th. 
Room 4151 Grainger Hall, 975 University Ave, Madison, WI
Parking is available in the garage underneath Grainger hall, entrance on N. Brooks Street.

In recent years, feminist philosophers have engaged the materiality of (disabled) bodies by deploying analytics such as assemblage, affect, and desire.  In this essay I argue that though these analytics offer some trangressive possibilities for engaging disability, the speculum of ignorance foregrounds a disconnect between the transgressive embodiment and the material conditions within which these bodies become “misfits,” albeit their disruptive potential..  To make my argument,  I  discuss three scenarios that foreground how the politics of race, class, gender, and sexuality constitute a violent political anatomy of the body that enables the fetishization of the flesh and has critical implications for a more nuanced and complex mode of describing “becoming disabled” in the transnational contexts of neo-liberal politics. In each of these contexts, I engage the epistemologies of ignorance that surface when disability is centered as the critical analytic in its intersection with race, and gender, within the violent material conditions that become apparent via the speculum, a tool for “widening all kinds of orifices to improve observation and intervention in the interest of projects that are simultaneously about freedom, justice, and knowledge” (Haraway qtd in Tuana, 2006, p. 16)

Nirmala Erevelles is Professor of Social and Cultural Studies in Education in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies at the University of Alabama. Her research interests are in transnational feminist theory, disability studies, and the sociology of education. Her recent book, Disability and Difference in Global Contexts: Towards a Transformative Body Politic was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2011.

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For additional information or questions, contact Katie Fox at krfox2@wisc.edu

Nirmala Erevelles's visit is made possible by the support of UW Disability Studies Initiative, Gender and Women’s Studies, Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, McBurney Disability Resource Center, Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Humanities, and the Anonymous Fund.

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David Serlin, Professor of Communication,

University of California San Diego

 
Mellon Workshop
Monday, February 25th,12:00-1:30pm,Helen C. White 7191
This event is wheelchair accessible. For additional accommodations, please contact krfox2@wisc.edu by Feb.18th.
Please click here to access the requireed reading, "Pissing without Pity: Disability, Gender, and the Public Toilet" by David Serlin. Please email Katie Fox at krfox2@wisc.edu for the password for the readings.

Public Lecture
Learning at Your Fingertips: Disability, Pedagogy, and Tactile Modernity in the Early Twentieth Century
Tuesday, February 26th, 5:30pm, Helen C. White 6191
This event is wheelchair accessible and features real-time captioning.  
For additional accommodations, please contact krfox2@wisc.edu by Feb.18th.

 

KIM NIELSEN, professor of Disability Studies at the University of Toledo and author of the recently published A Disability History of the United States, will be at UW Madison Tuesday, Nov. 27.

Mark your calendars for these events with Kim:

Tuesday, Nov. 27, 12:30-2:30 p.m.
Workshop:
"Accessing the Intersections," a Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop,
will meet to discuss selections from her book A Disability History of the U.S. with Kim.  All are welcome. Lunch included.
Please RSVP to Katie Fox at krfox2@wisc.edu by Tuesday, Nov. 20 if you would like to attend.

Location: Audubon Room, The University Club
803 State Street, Madison, WI

Required Readings (please email Katie Fox at the address below for the password. Depending on your browser, you may have to save or download the file to open it):
From Kim Nielsen's A Disability History of the United States:


Tuesday, Nov. 27, 5:00-7:00 p.m.:
Public Lecture:
"A Disability History of the U.S.; or, what I Learned from Reading My Own Book" 

Featuring Real Time Captioning. 
Location: Helen C. White 7191, 7th Floor
600 N. Park St., Madison, WI

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All events are wheelchair accessible.  The lecture on Nov. 27 features real-time captioning.  If you need a disability- accommodation to attend an event please contact Katie Fox at krfox2@wisc.edu.  Requests for additional accommodations should made by Nov 20.
Kim Nielsen's visit is made possible by the support of the Disability Studies Cluster, the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, the Department of History, the McBurney Disability Resource Center, the Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Humanities, and the Anonymous Fund.


 

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PAST EVENTS

ELI CLARE, acclaimed activist and writer, author of the award-winning Exile and Pride: Disability, Queerness, and Liberation, will be here at UW as a Brittingham Visiting Scholar for the week of Oct. 8-12. 

Mark your calendars for these exciting events with Eli:

  • Monday, Oct. 8, 5:00-6:30 p.m. 
    Workshop: 
    "Moving Beyond Pity and Inspiration: Doing Disability Ally Work."
    Location: Media Room, UW Office of Admission and Recruitment, 1st Floor,  702 W. Johnson St (corner of Lake and W. Johnson)
     
  • Wednesday, Oct. 10, 7:00 p.m.
    Brittingham Visiting Scholar Lecture: "Listening to the Freaks: A History of Circus Tents and Everyday Gawking." 

    Featuring Real Time Captioning.  Reception to follow.
    Location: Grainger 5120, Capitol Conference Room, 5th Floor, 975 University Ave
  • Friday, Oct. 12, 12:00-2:00 p.m.
    Discussion:
    "Accessing the Intersections," a Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop
    The workshop will meet to read and discuss Eli's work with him.  Reading is available here (please email Katie Fox at the address below for the password. Depending on your browser, you may have to save or download the file to open it).  All are welcome. Location:  Helen C. White 7191, 7th Floor, 600 N. Park St.

All events are wheelchair accessible.  The lecture on Oct. 10 features real-time captioning.  If you need a disability- accommodation to attend an event please contact Katie Fox at krfox2@wisc.edu.  Requests for additional captioning, ASL interpretation, or other accommodations should be made by Oct. 3, 2012.  Parking questions should also be directed to Katie Fox at the above email address.
Eli Clare's visit is made possible by the generous support of the Brittingham Visiting Scholars Program, with additional support from LGBT Studies, the LGBT Campus Center, the McBurney Disability Resource Center, UW Disability Studies, the George L. Mosse Program in History, and the Center for Research on Gender and Women.  Additional support for Accessing the Intersections is provided by the Anonymous Fund, the Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Humanities, the Provost for Equity and Diversity, and the Office of Student Life.

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Carrie Sandahl and Riva Lehrer

Story Problems: The Terror of Speaking for Our People

April 27, 2012 @ 12:00 pm

7191 Helen C. White

This event is wheelchair accessible and features real-time captioning. Requests for ASL interpretation or print materials in an alternative format should be made no less than one week in advance of the event. Please contact Ariel Eisenberg at eisenberg2@wisc.edu with any access questions.

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Alison Kafer

Practicing Feminist/Queer/Crip

April 17, 2012 @ 5:00 pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery Town Center

This event is wheelchair accessible and features real-time captioning. Requests for ASL interpretation or print materials in an alternative format should be made no less than one week in advance of the event. Please contact Ariel Eisenberg at eisenberg2@wisc.edu with any access questions.

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Susan Burch

Dislocated Pasts: Removals, Asylums, and Community in American History

April 16, 2012 @ 5:00 pm

Curti Lounge, Mosse Humanities Building (5th floor)

This event is wheelchair accessible and features real-time captioning. Requests for ASL interpretation or print materials in an alternative format should be made no less than one week in advance of the event. Please contact Ariel Eisenberg at eisenberg2@wisc.edu with any access questions.

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Benjamin Reiss

Emory University

Brownbag workshop on The Cambridge History of the American Novel

March 16, 2012 @ 4:00 pm

7191 Helen C. White

Accessing the Intersections is sponsored by Disability Studies and the Center for Research on Gender and women, with additional sponsorship provided by the Department of English, the Anonymous Fund, Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Humanities, Provost's Office for Equity and Diversity, Waisman Center, McBurney Center, and the Office of Student Life.

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Benjamin Reiss

Sleeping At Walden Pond: Thoreau, Abnormal Temporality, and the Modern Body

March 15, 2012 @ 4:00 pm

7191 HC White

This talk explores how sleep came to be a problem in need of micro-management, medical attention, and pervasive worry. It braids together literary, medical, religious, and social  history from the Enlightenment to the present. Benjamin Reiss (Ph.D. UC Berkeley, 1997) specializes in 19th-century American literature and culture, with strong interests in the history of medicine, race, disability, popular culture, and environmental issues. He is an editor of The Cambridge History of the American Novel, a collection of seventy new essays by leading scholars in the  field of American literary studies, including UW-Madison’s own Russ Castronovo, Sean Teuton and David Zimmerman.

Reiss is the author of The Showman and the Slave: Race, Death, and Memory in Barnum's America (Harvard UP, 2001) and Theaters of Madness: Insane Asylums and Nineteenth-Century American Culture (University of Chicago Press, 2008), as well as essays in journals including American Literary History, Social Text, ELH, American Quarterly, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and Slate. In addition, he has appeared on numerous radio NPR and PRI radio programs discussing his work.

This event is wheelchair accessible and features real-time captioning. Requests for ASL interpretation or print materials in an alternative format should be made no less than one week in advance of the event. Please contact Ariel Eisenberg at eisenberg2@wisc.edu with any access questions.

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David Serlin

Learning At Your Fingertips: Architecture, Disability, and Tactile Modernity in the Early Twentieth Century

February 20, 2012 @ 5:00 pm
Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery Town Center

This event is wheelchair accessible and features real-time captioning. Requests for ASL interpretation or print materials in an alternative format should be made no less than one week in advance of the event. Please contact Ariel Eisenberg at eisenberg2@wisc.edu with any access questions.

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Jim Ferris

Poet and Professor of Disability Studies, University of Toledo

December 5, 2011 @ 5:00 pm

Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery Town Center

Prof. Ferris will read from his latest collection of poems, Slouching Toward Guantanamo, and from the new anthology in which his work is featured, Beauty Is A Verb: The New Poetry of Disability.

This talk is part of the 2011-2012 series Accessing the Intersections, sponsored by UW Disability Studies and the Center for Research on Gender and Women, with generous sponsorship and support from the Anonymous Fund, Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, McBurney Center, Waisman Center, Provost for Equity and Diversity, and Office of Student Life.

This event is wheelchair accessible and real-time captioned. Requests for sign language interpreters or print materials in an alternative format should be made no less than one week in advance of the event, although all efforts will be made to accommodate requests received later.  Please contact Ariel Eisenberg at eisenberg2@wisc.edu to make a request or with any other access question.

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Leslie Swartz

November 16, 2011 @ 5:00 pm

3401 Sterling Hall

Prof. Leslie Swartz, editor-in-chief of African Journal of Disability will speak on his work on access to health care for people from vulnerable groups in four African countries, as well as on language access to mental health care, and building research capacity at Disabled People’s Organizations in southern Africa.

This talk is part of the 2011-2012 series Accessing the Intersections, sponsored by UW Disability Studies and the Center for Research on Gender and Women, with generous sponsorship and support from the Anonymous Fund, Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, McBurney Center, Waisman Center, Provost for Equity and Diversity, and Office of Student Life.

This event is wheelchair accessible. Real-time captioning will be provided for this event. Requests for sign language interpreters or print materials in an alternative format should be made no less than one week in advance of the event, although all efforts will be made to accommodate requests received later.  Please contact Ariel Eisenberg at eisenberg2@wisc.edu to make a request or with any other access question.

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Cynthia Wu

Department of American Studies at SUNY-Buffalo

New Directions in Asian-American Studies: 
Chang and Eng Bunker's Descendants and the Invention of Kinship


October 4, 2011 @ 5:00 pm

206 Ingraham