Public Humanities Conference

2014 Agenda

7th Annual 
Conference on the Public Humanities

The Public Good

Center for the Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Friday, April 25, 2014

Condensed Schedule          Full Schedule


Condensed Schedule

• Morning Plenaries | 9:00 am - 12:15 pm | Varsity Hall 1 @ Union South

The Value of the Humanities

Chancellor Rebecca M. Blank, University of Wisconsin-Madison
     9:00 - 10:00 am; Varsity Hall 1 @ Union South More information More

What are the Humanities For?

Christopher Newfield, Professor of Literature and American Studies, University of California-Santa Barbara
     10:15 - 11:30 am; Varsity Hall 1 @ Union South More information More

Panel Discussion

With UW Faculty Sara Guyer, Rob Nixon, Lynn Nyhart, Russ Shafer-Landau,
and Doris Sommer, Harvard University
     11:30 am - 12:30 pm; Varsity Hall 1 @ Union South More information More
 

• Hands-On Workshops | 1:45 pm - 3:30 pm (Concurrent Sessions)
Madison Central Public Library, 201 W. Mifflin St.

   Space will be limited; registration for workshops is strongly
    recommended. 
Workshop Registration Form

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Kelly Hiser, Public Humanities Fellow, Madison Public Library
More information More

Humanities on the Radio: Telling Stories in Sound

Stephanie Youngblood, Public Humanities Fellow, To the Best of our Knowledge; Erika Janik, Producer, Wisconsin Life, Wisconsin Public Radio
More information More

Kids as Cultural Agents: Designing Humanities Programming for Young Audiences 

Anna Zeide, Public Humanities Fellow, Madison Children’s Museum; Gabriella Ekman, Public Humanities Fellows, Great World Texts in Wisconsin; Heather DuBois Bourenane, Public Humanities Fellows, Great World Texts in Wisconsin; and Doris Sommer, Ira Jewell Williams Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, Director of Graduate Studies in Spanish, and Director of the Cultural Agency Initiative, Harvard University
More information More

• Roundtable Discussion and Reception | 3:45 - 6:00 pm
Madison Central Public Library, 201 W. Mifflin St.

Engaging Madison: 10 Years of the Public Humanities Exchange

Greg Downey, Evjue-Bascom Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication, UW-Madison; Mytoan Nguyen-Akbar, Sociology, UW-Madison; 2009-10 Public Humanities Exchange Scholar - "Telling Our Stories" with the Madison Metropolitan School District; Janelle Pulczinski, Comparative Literature, UW-Madison; 2011-12 Public Humanities Exchange Scholar - "Literature Beyond Bars: Creative Communities for Newly Released Prisoners" with the Catholic Multicultural Center; Alexandra Rudnick, History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, UW-Madison; 2013-14 Public Humanities Exchange Scholar - "Kidshare Student Documentaries" with the East Madison Community Center
     3:45 - 5:00 pm; Madison Central Public Library More information More

Reception

Food by Underground Catering
     5:00 - 6:00 pm; Madison Central Public Library

 

Full Schedule

• Morning Plenaries | 9:00 am - 12:15 pm | Varsity Hall 1 @ Union South

The Value of the Humanities

Chancellor Rebecca M. Blank, University of Wisconsin-Madison
     9:00 - 10:00 am; Varsity Hall 1 @ Union South 

 

What are the Humanities For?

Christopher Newfield, Professor of Literature and American Studies, University of California-Santa Barbara
     10:15 - 11:30 am; Varsity Hall 1 @ Union South 

Panel Discussion

With UW Faculty Sara Guyer, Rob Nixon, Lynn Nyhart, Russ Shafer-Landau,
and Doris Sommer, Harvard University
     11:30 am - 12:30 pm; Varsity Hall 1 @ Union South 
 

• Hands-On Workshops | 1:45 pm - 3:30 pm (Concurrent Sessions)
Madison Central Public Library, 201 W. Mifflin St.

   Space will be limited; registration for workshops is strongly
    recommended. 
Workshop Registration Form

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

Kelly Hiser, Public Humanities Fellow, Madison Public Library

As the world’s largest encyclopedia that anyone can edit, Wikipedia is a public humanities project of massive proportions. It’s also the most popular source for information on the internet, and, as such, a powerful platform for public engagement. But the information that people find there is only as accurate and extensive as Wikipedia editors make it, and, as many have pointed out, gaps exist in many areas.

At this Edit-a-thon, we invite community and university members to strengthen Wikipedia’s coverage of the humanities and to discuss how the encyclopedia can act as a meeting point between campus and community. We welcome first-time and experienced contributors alike to improve Wikipedia’s coverage in any area of the humanities, including language, literature, the performing arts, communication, and history, just to name a few. During the Edit-a-thon we will gather together to discuss Wikipedia’s impact and potential. Participants can then work on their own or with experienced editors who will help them sign up for an account and learn the basics of editing.

If you plan on registering for this workshop, please create a Wikipedia account before April 25.
Here's a link to a basic tutorial to help get you started.

Humanities on the Radio: Telling Stories in Sound

Stephanie Youngblood, Public Humanities Fellow, To the Best of our Knowledge; Erika Janik, Producer, Wisconsin Life, Wisconsin Public Radio

How do you explain the world in five minutes - or less? Big ideas can seem impossible to convey in a short time slot. But people feel so grateful when you clearly explain something complicated or introduce them to people they might never encounter in their daily lives. These stories provide an entry point to learn more. Discover tips and tricks for taking big ideas to the public through audio storytelling. Stephanie Youngblood and Erika Janik will share how they find and organize stories and audio segments, and how to write for the ear rather than the eye through examples and in class activities.

Kids as Cultural Agents: Designing Humanities Programming for Young Audiences 

Anna Zeide, Public Humanities Fellow, Madison Children’s Museum; Gabriella Ekman, Public Humanities Fellows, Great World Texts in Wisconsin; Heather DuBois Bourenane, Public Humanities Fellows, Great World Texts in Wisconsin; and Doris Sommer, Ira Jewell Williams Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, Director of Graduate Studies in Spanish, and Director of the Cultural Agency Initiative, Harvard University

How do kids learn through and about the humanities? How does thinking about – and engaging with - culture and history help them shape their worlds? Can a sense of belonging and empowerment emerge from storytelling and mastering the craft of narrative? In this program, UW-Madison Center for the Humanities Public Humanities Fellows Anna Zeide, Gabriella Ekman and Heather DuBois Bourenane will share their experiences working with Wisconsin youth through the Madison Children’s Museum and the Center's Great World Texts program. Doris Sommer, of Harvard University, will discuss her work with the Cultural Agents initiative. Humanities professionals, public programmers at local non-profits and community centers, educators, and graduate students are encourage to attend and share their thoughts on their own projects and the impact of humanities-based programming.

• Roundtable Discussion and Reception | 3:45 - 6:00 pm
Madison Central Public Library, 201 W. Mifflin St.

Engaging Madison: 10 Years of the Public Humanities Exchange

Greg Downey, Evjue-Bascom Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication, UW-Madison; Mytoan Nguyen-Akbar, Sociology, UW-Madison; 2009-10 Public Humanities Exchange Scholar - "Telling Our Stories" with the Madison Metropolitan School District; Janelle Pulczinski, Comparative Literature, UW-Madison; 2011-12 Public Humanities Exchange Scholar - "Literature Beyond Bars: Creative Communities for Newly Released Prisoners" with the Catholic Multicultural Center; Alexandra Rudnick, History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, UW-Madison; 2013-14 Public Humanities Exchange Scholar - "Kidshare Student Documentaries" with the East Madison Community Center
     3:45 - 5:00 pm; Madison Central Public Library 

Launched in 2005, The Center for the Humanities' Public Humanities Exchange (HEX) provides opportunities for UW-Madison graduate students to develop humanities-based programs in the community. Working closely with partners such as area Libraries, Community Centers, cultural organizations, and correctional institutions, HEX students and their partner organizations create mutually beneficial programs; enabling students to develop innovative new contexts for humanities scholarship, while encouraging community partners to find a role for the humanities in their own programs.

How have these projects positively impacted Madison? What have graduate students and community organizations learned from these partnerships? What role can humanities-based programming play in improving life and increasing learning opportunities in Madison? Join us to learn more about the program, meet the people behind several exciting projects, and discover how both community organizations and graduate can become involved.

Reception

Food by Underground Catering
     5:00 - 6:00 pm; Madison Central Public Library