Special Events

Upcoming Events

Jordan Ellenberg

Jordan Ellenberg

Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Thursday, October 16, 2014 @ 5:30pm

William P. Jones

William P. Jones

Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison

I Have a Dream: The Forgotten History of Civil Rights Saturday, November 8, 2014 @ 10:30am

Past Events

Catherine Porter

Catherine Porter

2009 President of the Modern Language Association; Visiting Professor, Society for the Humanities, Cornell University; Professor of French, Emerita, State University of New York, Cortland

Teaching World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Evolving Structures and Curricula Wednesday, May 7, 2014 @ 5:30pm 254 Van Hise Hall, 1220 Linden Drive

This lecture will discuss current pressures to transform governance structures and curriculum design in world language departments in U.S. colleges and universities, with examples of changes in progress at selected institutions. It will address the Preliminary Plan for a School of World Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and will point to some potentially useful resources available from the Modern Language Association, concluding with some suggestions for next steps in the process launched by the World Languages, Literatures, & Cultures Task Force in the fall of 2013.

Catherine Porter, 2009 President of the Modern Language Association, is Visiting Professor, Society for the Humanities, Cornell University and Professor of French Emerita, State University of New York, Cortland, where she served as chair of the Department of International Communications and Culture from 1985-91 and from 1997-2001. She has published more than three dozen book-length translations in the humanities and the social sciences, most recently Luc Boltanski's The Foetal Condition, and Anne Berger's The Queer Turn in Feminism. Recent articles include "Translation as Scholarship" (ADFL Bulletin, 2009), "The MLA Recommendations: Can We Get There from Here?" (ADFL Bulletin 41.1, 2009), "English Is Not Enough," (PMLA, May 2010), and "Translation in the Curriculum (ADE Bulletin, 2011). She received her doctorate in French literature from Yale University in 1972.

Sponsored by the Language Institute and Center for the Humanities, on behalf of the L&S World Languages, Literatures, & Cultures Task Force.

Humanities Hackathon with the Yahara Music Library

Humanities Hackathon with the Yahara Music Library

Presenters Preston Austin, co-founder of Murfie, Inc., Steve Faulkner, lead developer, Murfie, Inc., and Kelly Hiser, Madison Public Library

Lending, Owning, and Describing Digital Media Thursday, May 1, 2014 @ 3:00pm Researchers' Link, Discovery Building, 330 North Orchard Street

The Yahara Music Library (YML) is a soon-to-be-released collection of local music that public library patrons in South Central Wisconsin can download and stream for free. The Madison Public Library and tech startup, Murfie, are working together to create YML by licensing albums from local musicians and building a new content delivery platform. For the library, YML represents an investment in Madison’s creative community and a move away from the ubiquitous digital rights management of public library digital lending. YML’s emergence at a time when public libraries increasingly license (rather than purchase) content raises questions about the value, ownership, and objecthood of digital media. At this hackathon, we’ll explore how YML’s potential to capture a rich data set might shed light on some of those questions by illuminating connections between musical cultures, economies, and technologies. Participants will be introduced to the objectives and the mechanics of the project, and work together to imagine and sketch out ways to use, extend, and connect to this collection and its underlying platform.

Register here to reserve your spot.

Build conversation with the Twitter hashtag #HumanitiesHack

Accessing the Discovery Building for WID events.

Questions? Send WID's events team an email or call (608) 316-4676.

The Humanities Hackathon, an ongoing collaboration between the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery (WID) and the Center for the Humanities, investigates computational techniques for humanistic inquiry, uncovering unexpected connections and intriguing patterns in music, visual art, literature, and historical works. Monthly "hacks" bridge the gap between seemingly unrelated disciplines and enrich discussions about transdisciplinary work. Meetings consist of roughly one hour of presentations and discussion, followed by an hour of lab time, where participants can share projects, trade ideas, run programs, and receive support for software and techniques.

Photo credit: Gayle Laird/Exploratorium via Flickr

Teaching Great World Texts in Wisconsin

Teaching Great World Texts in Wisconsin

A Collaborative Colloquium with Keynote Doris Sommer Monday, April 28, 2014 @ 8:30am Varsity Hall at Union South

An all-day conference for high school, middle school, home school, and college teachers in any discipline; and members of the community to discuss and strategize practices and possibilities in teaching world literature.

Click here for the full schedule. 

Keynote Doris Sommer is founder of Cultural Agents and Pre-Texts at Harvard University, and is the Ira Jewell Williams, Jr., Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and African and African American Studies, also at Harvard University. Professor Sommer is recognized as one of the world's leading developers of the concept of cultural agency.

Other sessions will be led by UW-Madison faculty and staff, and veteran teachers in the Great World Texts program. 

Free and open to the public.  Lunch is available for pre-registered attendees only.  Limited scholarships may be available for teachers not participating in this year's program who plan to apply for our 2014-2015 program, Rousseau's Confessions in Wisconsin.

The Public Good

The Public Good

Chancellor Rebecca Blank, Christopher Newfield, and Doris Sommer

Public Humanities Conference Friday, April 25, 2014 @ 9:00am Varsity Hall at Union South and the Madison Central Public Library

The 7th Annual Public Humanities Conference examines the role of the humanities as a force for public good. Presentations and workshops will address the value, orientation, and possibility of humanities programming on the air, on the web, and out in the community.

The morning session in Varsity Hall at Union South will feature UW-Madison Chancellor Rebecca M. Blank and Christopher Newfield, Professor of English at UC-Santa Barbara. 

The afternoon session will take place at Madison Central Public Library and feature concurrent hands-on workshops with UW graduate students as well as special guests from Wisconsin Public Radio, the Madison Public Library, and the Cultural Agents Program at Harvard University, and a roundtable discussion about public engagement in Madison. All will be followed by a reception catered by Underground Catering.

Detailed agenda here.

Directions, accessibility, and parking for Union South and Madison Central Public Library.

 

Humanities Hackathon with Hoyt Long

Humanities Hackathon with Hoyt Long

Assistant professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

Global Literary Networks: Exploring Modernist Style and Influence at the Macro-Scale Thursday, April 10, 2014 @ 3:00pm Researchers' Link, Discovery Building, 330 N. Orchard St.

Professor Long will discuss recent work from his ongoing collaborative project "Global Literary Networks." With a specific focus on global literary modernism and poetry--and leveraging macroscale techniques such as text mining, machine learning, and network analysis--the project seeks a more comprehensive understanding of the social dimensions of literary production. This presentation focuses on questions related to style and influence. Namely, how do computational techniques help us explore the total literary field as a system of competing styles? And how do they help us understand the mechanisms by which new styles and forms are diffused through this field? In addition to sharing results from recent case studies on stylistic exclusion in US poetry and the global diffusion of the haiku form, Professor Long will speak generally about the tools and techniques employed in his research and about the rewards of collaborative work in the humanities.

Register here to reserve your spot.

Download these resources for the hands-on portion of the hack.

Build conversation with the Twitter hashtag #HumanitiesHack

Accessing the Discovery Building for WID events.

Questions? Send WID's events team an email or call (608) 316-4676.

The Humanities Hackathon, an ongoing collaboration between the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery (WID) and the Center for the Humanities, investigates computational techniques for humanistic inquiry, uncovering unexpected connections and intriguing patterns in music, visual art, literature, and historical works. Monthly "hacks" bridge the gap between seemingly unrelated disciplines and enrich discussions about transdisciplinary work. Meetings consist of roughly one hour of presentations and discussion, followed by an hour of lab time, where participants can share projects, trade ideas, run programs, and receive support for software and techniques.

Hoyt Long is a scholar of modern Japanese literature interested in sociology of culture, media history, and the digital humanities. He is assistant professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. His first book, On Uneven Ground: Miyazawa Kenji and the Making of Place in Modern Japan (2011), examines the ways in which artistic and literary activity intersected with ideas about place and locality in Japan’s prewar period. He is currently working on a project that considers postal technologies of late-19th- and early-20th-century Japan as forms of “new media.” He is focusing on the ways these technologies impacted practices of writing—literary or otherwise—and how they may or may not have altered established patterns and ideas of social association and communication.

 

Kim Stanley Robinson

Kim Stanley Robinson

American Science Fiction Writer; Author of Mars Trilogy

Imagining Possible Worlds Wednesday, April 9, 2014 @ 7:30pm Town Center, Discovery Building, 330 N. Orchard St.

The Center for the Humanities, Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, and To the Best of Our Knowledge present Imagining Possible Worlds, a conversation about literature, science, and the future.

Renowned science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson, WID Director David Krakauer, Literary Scholar Monique Allewaert and TTBOOK producer and WID Distinguished Scholar Steve Paulson will explore how humanists, scientists, and writers bring distinct but overlapping approaches to universal questions about shared global interests, ranging from climate change and geo-engineering to creating more egalitarian and sustainable societies, and how science fiction can help us imagine the future.

At the event, Robinson will announce the winning entries of the Three Minute Futures flash science fiction contest. The winning entries, dramatized for radio, will premiere at the symposium and will air on To The Best Of Our Knowlege the weekend of April 12.

Robinson will be available to sign books after the event. Book sales will be handled by A Room of One's Own Bookstore. The restaurant, Steenbock's on Orchard, located on the first floor of the Discovery Building, will be open for drinks and a late dinner seating after the event as well.

More about the Panelists:

Kim Stanley Robinson

Robinson is a Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author best-known for his Mars Trilogy. His most recent book Shaman explores the political and cultural dynamics of society during the Ice Age, before the invention of writing.

David Krakauer

Krakauer is the director of the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery, co-director for the Center for Complexity and Collective Computation, professor of genetics at UW-Madison, and external professor at the Santa Fe Institute. His research focuses on the evolutionary history of information processing mechanisms in adaptive systems.

Monique Allewaert

Allewaert is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her first book Ariel’s Ecology: Plantations, Personhood, and Colonialism in the American Tropics (Minnesota, 2013) shows how the cultural forms of Afro- and Anglo-Americans in the American tropics presume what we might call an ecological mode of personhood. Allewaert serves on the editorial boards of American Literature and Resilience and has co-edited a Special Issue of American Literature focused on Ecocriticism (2012). Currently she is writing a book that integrates empiricist theories, materialisms, and ecocriticism to offer a new account of figure and figuration in 18th- and 19th-century writing.

Moderator

Steve Paulson

Paulson is the executive producer and an interviewer with To the Best of Our Knowledge. Paulson has written for Salon, Slate, Huffington Post, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Independent, and other publications. His radio reports have also been broadcast on NPR’s “Morning Edition” and “All Things Considered.” His recent book, Atoms and Eden: Conversations on Religion and Science, was published by Oxford University Press.

Humanities Hackathon with WID’s Games+Learning+Society Group

Humanities Hackathon with WID’s Games+Learning+Society Group

Trails Forward: Designing Games for Learning & Learning from Games Thursday, March 13, 2014 @ 3:00pm Researchers' Link, Discovery Building, 330 N. Orchard St.

Trails Forward is a multiplayer real-time strategy game for the iPad aimed at teaching kids aged 9-12 about human impact on the environment and about complex systems. Players will control one of three careers - Lumber, Steel, or Farming - and attempt to build up their business in multiple different types of environments. Through harvesting natural resources, constructing buildings, and producing products, they will not only affect the environment but also each other. In doing so, they will learn that even the simplest of actions can have a huge impact.

Participants in the Hackathon will have the opportunity to preview and play the game.

Register to reserve your spot.

Build conversation with the Twitter hashtag #HumanitiesHack

Accessing the Discovery Building for WID events.

Questions? Send WID's events team an email or call (608) 316-4676.

The Humanities Hackathon, an ongoing collaboration between the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery (WID) and the Center for the Humanities, investigates computational techniques for humanistic inquiry, uncovering unexpected connections and intriguing patterns in music, visual art, literature, and historical works. Monthly "hacks" bridge the gap between seemingly unrelated disciplines and enrich discussions about transdisciplinary work. Meetings consist of roughly one hour of presentations and discussion, followed by an hour of lab time, where participants can share projects, trade ideas, run programs, and receive support for software and techniques.

WID's Games+Learning+Society is a group of researchers, game developers, and government/industry leaders who investigate how games operate, transform learning, and affect societyThe team has developed several award-winning titles of its own, launched two educational game companies, and in collaboration with UW’s DoIT office, produced the Augmented Reality and Interactive Storytelling (ARIS) engine, a resource used by thousands of educators around the world.

 

Queer and Now: Rethinking Queer Theory in the Humanities

Queer and Now: Rethinking Queer Theory in the Humanities

A Symposium by the The Sexual Politics/Sexual Poetics Collective Friday, March 7, 2014 @ 1:30pm College Library 2252 A-B (Media Labs)

Queer and Now brings members of the Sexual Politics/Sexual Poetics Collective to UW Madison to explore the cutting edge of work in contemporary queer theory alongside members of the UW Faculty working in the fields of LGBT studies, gender and women's studies, and literary and cultural studies.

The symposium will consist of two parts:

Keywords at a Swerve (1:30-3:30), will explore keywords in contemporary queer theory as well as critical responses to those keywords by young scholars whose work takes up, reinvents, or deviates from the central terms of the field.

Temporality: Aida Hussen (keyword)
At a Loss for Time: Erotic Velocities and Queer Desires: Jennifer Row (swerve)

Negativity: Damon Young (keyword)
How to Really Feel Bad: Adding Flesh to Negativity: Amber Musser (swerve)

Aesthetic: Jill Casid (keyword)
Performing Objecthood: Uri McMillan (swerve)

Affect: Jordan Stein (keyword)
Affective Histories Kadji Amin (swerve)

Making a Queer Scene: Conversations in Queer Theory (4:15-5:30) will consist of a series of roundtable discussions co-facilitated by a member of the collective and a UW faculty member. Each discussion will focus on two competing or analogous terms that have animated debates in both queer theory and the humanities more broadly. To participate in one of the following roundtable discussions, please e-mail Ramzi Fawaz (Assistant Professor of English) at fawaz@wisc.edu.

-Race / Performance: Shanté Smalls & Katie Brewer Ball 
-Queer Reading / ”Reading”: Ramzi Fawaz & Roy Pérez
-Disability / The Body: Ellen Samuels & Leslie Bow
-Transgender / Anti-identitarian: A. Finn Enke & Zakiyyah Jackson

Formed in September 2014, the Sexual Politics/Sexual Poetics Collective is a national working group of first-year and early career queer theory professors working to transform, and expand, the scope of sexuality studies in the humanities. Queer and Now is their inaugural event.

Members of the Sexual Politics/Sexual Poetics Collective: Kadji Amin (Stony Brook University), Katie Brewer Ball (Wesleyan University), Ramzi Fawaz (UW Madison), Zakiyyah Jackson (University of Virginia), Uri McMillan (UCLA), Amber J. Musser (University of Washington, St. Louis), Roy Perez (Willamette University), Jennifer Row (Boston University), Shanté Smalls (University of New Mexico), Jordon Stein (Fordham University), Damon Young (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor).

Participating UW Faculty: Leslie Bow (English), Jill Casid (Art History), A. Finn Enke (History and Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies), Aida Hussen (English), Ellen Samuels (Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies and English).  

More information at http://queerandnow.tumblr.com/symposium or contact Ramzi Fawaz: fawaz@wisc.edu

Brenda Bufalino

Brenda Bufalino

Tap Dance: Made in America Tuesday, March 4, 2014 @ 7:00pm Great Hall, Memorial Union

A lecture demonstration about the styles, periods, performance, presentation and creation of American jazz tap dance with Madison's own jazz pianist, Dave Stoler.

One of the first and still very few white women to be welcomed into the mostly Black and male world of expert rhythm tappers, Brenda Bufalino made a name for herself by working in interracial dance companies in the 1950s when she was still a teen-ager. She grew up to create tap sequences that dazzled, and to teach more than three generations of tap artists. Gregory Hines has called her "one of the greatest female dancers that ever lived." The founder of the American Tap Dance Foundation, Bufalino has been one of engines that stoked the revival of tap dance and the mainstreaming of 'rhythm tap.' She has performed at Carnegie Hall and the Palladium, she danced with the legendary Charles 'Honi' Coles, and in this rare appearance, she will present a master class and lecture demonstration on the history of tap in motion. 

This project is supported in part, by TAPIT/new works Ensemble Theater, the Wisconsin Union Directorate Performing Arts Committee, the University of Wisconsin Center for Humanities, Edgewood College Educational Programming Board, and the University of Stevens Point COFAC Great Artists, Great Speakers Series. 

3 Minute Futures

3 Minute Futures

with Kim Stanley Robinson

A Flash Science Fiction Contest Saturday, March 1, 2014 @ 11:59pm Wisconsin Public Radio

The Center for the Humanities, Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and Wisconsin Public Radio’s To the Best of Our Knowledge invite submissions for a national flash fiction contest. Submissions should be based on “real science and set in the near future.” Legendary science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson, of Mars Trilogy fame, will judge the contest. Three winning entries will be turned into radio plays, produced by To the Best of Our Knowledge and dramatized by the Ensemble Studio Theatre-Los Angeles under the direction of Gates McFadden, best known as Dr. Beverly Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation. The contest begins February 1 and the deadline for submissions is March 1, 2014.

The three partner institutions will review entries for writing quality, plausibility based on grounding in 'hard' science, and their ability to be translated for dramatization on the radio. Kim Stanley Robinson will make the final selections.

Winning entries will be broadcast nationally on nearly 200 public radio stations during To the Best of Our Knowledge.  One grand prize winner will also receive an autographed copy of Robinson’s new novel Shaman and will be showcased at a symposium on Imagining Future Worlds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 9, 2014. 

Guidelines for Entry:

·         Your story must be set in the near future and draw on the tradition of “hard” science fiction - science fiction that is scientifically plausible.
·         Possible story themes include: communication, energy, computing, robotics, biomedicine, drones, spaceflight, nanotechnology, ecological concerns, food production, reproduction, end-of-life, surveillance, but other themes are welcome.
·         500-600 words - short enough to be read aloud in three minutes and suitable for national broadcast on public radio.
·         Only one entry per person – find complete official rules online at:http://www.ttbook.org/3-minute-futures
·         Submit stories at http://www.ttbook.org/book/3mf-submission-form no later than 11:59 p.m. CT, March 1, 2014.

On Music, Philosophy, and Media

On Music, Philosophy, and Media

A Roundtable with Philosopher and Musicologist Peter Szendy and UW Faculty Friday, February 28, 2014 @ 10:30am Room 313 University Club Building (432 E. Campus Mall)

How do even the most groan-inducing "earworms" shape our everyday experience? Join philosopher and musicologist Peter Szendy and a panel of UW-Madison faculty for an informal roundtable on the theory, production, dissemination, and global dominance of the hit song.

Featuring Lee Blasius, UW professor of music theory, currently at work on a study of music and the notions of "truth" and "authenticity"; Jeremy Morris, UW faculty in the department of Communication Arts, who studies technologies of music production and consumption, including the digitization of music and its cultural significance; and Ron Radano, UW music faculty and award-winning ethnomusicologist, who writes on music, the ideological formation of race, cultural theory, and history.

Hillary Chute

Hillary Chute

Neubauer Family Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Chicago

Words, Images, and War: Joe Sacco and the Work of Comics Journalism Thursday, February 20, 2014 @ 7:00pm Howard Auditorium, Fluno Center, 601 University Ave.

This lecture focuses on Joe Sacco's work to examine how graphic narrative is a prominent form for reporting on violence, investigating two related questions. First, what work does the visual articulation of violence do in texts about war? Second, why has drawing re-emerged as a form for reporting on war - after the age of the camera and of film - and what does this tell us about the exigencies and ethics of representation and contemporary literary and journalistic practice.

Presented by the English Graduate Student Association as part of the MadLit 2014 Conference on Texts and Violence. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities; Department of English; A.W. Mellon Workshop on Comics; Center for Culture, History, and the Environment; Center for Print and Digital Culture; Contemporary Literature Colloquium; Americanist Lecture Series; and Middle Modernity Group. Funding courtesy of the Anonymous Fund. Image by Joe Sacco.

Humanities Hackathon with Paul Hansen

Humanities Hackathon with Paul Hansen

Campus Debate: Building a Social Media Platform for Student Debates Thursday, February 13, 2014 @ 3:00pm Researchers' Link, Discovery Building, 330 North Orchard Street

When was the last time you saw a college student engaged in a thoughtful, critical dialogue on television? Campus Debate, a start-up company founded by a UW-Madison graduate student, is building a participatory, web-based platform to host a series of competitive student debates between different universities. Imagine watching streaming video of two students from UW-Madison sitting across a table from two NYU students, debating an issue of social importance, like gun control or marriage equality. Imagine that you could participate in the debate as it unfolds, using a smartphone or tablet, while also seeing the results of other people participating. As much of Campus Debate as possible will be student-led, from the choice of debate topics and selection of participants to the challenge of launching a start-up company. That open, inclusive approach to launching a tech start-up begins with the Humanities Hackathon.

Register to reserve your spot.

Build conversation with the Twitter hashtag #HumanitiesHack

Accessing the Discovery Building for WID events.

Questions? Send WID's events team an email or call (608) 316-4676.

The Humanities Hackathon, an ongoing collaboration between the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery (WID) and the Center for the Humanities, investigates computational techniques from the sciences with humanities scholars to uncover unexpected connections and intriguing patterns in music, visual art, literature, and historical works. Monthly "hacks" bridge the gap between seemingly unrelated disciplines and enrich discussions about transdiciplinary work. Meetings consist of roughly one hour of presentations and discussion, followed by an hour of lab time, where participants can share projects, trade ideas, run programs, and receive support for softward and techniques.

Paul Hansen is a PhD candidate (ABD) in English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His doctoral research is centered on contemporary American literature and film, with a specific focus on how cultural production is changing in relation to recent technological and sociocultural developments. He started Campus Debate in 2013 in order to take ideas developed in the classroom into a bigger, more public space.

 

KidShare Screening: Digital Storytelling from Truax

KidShare Screening: Digital Storytelling from Truax

Alexandra Rudnick and the Madison Children's Museum

Tuesday, December 17, 2013 @ 4:00pm Madison Children's Museum, 100 N. Hamilton St.

Join us for the debut of student filmmakers from the East Madison and Meadowood Community Centers. These four films - conceived, written, produced, and edited by middle and high schoolers - represent what matters most to the students, from the Center itself, friends, and sports, to simply having a safe and welcoming place to call their own. Join them at the Madison Children's Museum (MCM) to celebrate the films' debut, meet the filmmakers, and learn more about the MCM's new KidShare initiative.

Project Director: Alexandra Rudnick, 2013-14 Public Humanities Exchange Scholar. This project is a program of the Madison Children's Museum's KidShare Learning Lab.

Free and open to the public. Please email Jeff Kollath to register.

Self-Publishing Basics: A Wisconsin Book Festival/Public Humanities Event

Self-Publishing Basics: A Wisconsin Book Festival/Public Humanities Event

Kelly Hiser & Madison Public Library

Saturday, December 14, 2013 @ 1:00pm Room 302, Madison Central Library, 201 W. Mifflin St.

Join a team of librarians and published authors for a workshop that will introduce you to the basics of self publishing online. Learn about free tools that you can use to turn your work into an eBook. Hear about the issues and challenges that face authors who publish on their own. Get practical advice about marketing and building an audience for your work. Learn about library resources that can help at every stage of the process, from writing to cover design.

Project Director: Kelly Hiser, 2013-14 Public Humanities Fellow, Madison Public Library.

This program is part the Wisconsin Book Festival's year-long programming.

Free and open to the public. Please register here.

Zine Workshop

Zine Workshop

Elizabeth Barr (Communication Arts) and Malcolm Shabazz Alternative High School

Saturday, December 7, 2013 @ 9:30am Bubbler Room, Madison Central Library, 201 W. Mifflin St.

Malcolm Shabazz High School students who have been participating in a semester-long zine workshop will facilitate a workshop at the Madison Public Library. They will talk briefly about the basics of zine making and help workshop participants make their own zines on the theme of winter in Madison. At 1:30 pm, they will share their own work from this semester-long Public Humanities Exchange (HEX) project.  Don't know what a zine is?  Read more here.

Project Director: Elizabeth Barr, 2013-14 Public Humanities Exchange Scholar.

This program is part of the Meet Your Makers series at the Madison Public Library.

Humanities Hackathon with Eddie Lee and Jim Brown

Humanities Hackathon with Eddie Lee and Jim Brown

Sound Arguments with Sonic Eloquence Thursday, December 5, 2013 @ 3:00pm 3rd Floor Teaching Lab, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, 330 North Orchard Street

What are the sonic dimensions of persuasion, and how can we use computational machines to understand how sound operates rhetorically? In a project called "Sonic Eloquence," we are examining the human voice in an attempt to understand how sound is deployed by orators and how musicality is inherent to the spoken word. We are using computation to both analyze and generate sound as we track how sonic eloquence operates within and alongside human attempts to persuade.
 
Register to reserve your spot.

Build conversation with the Twitter hashtag #HumanitiesHack

Accessing the Discovery Building for WID events.

Questions? Send WID's events team an email or call (608) 316-4676.

The Humanities Hackathon, an ongoing collaboration between the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and the Center for the Humanities, investigates computational techniques from the sciences with humanities scholars to uncover unexpected connections and intriguing patterns in music, visual art, literature, and historical works.

Monthly "hacks" bridge the gap between seemingly unrelated disciplines and enrich discussions about transdiciplinary work. Meetings consist of roughly one hour of presentations and discussion, followed by an hour of lab time, where participants can share projects, trade ideas, run programs, and receive support for softward and techniques.

 
James J. Brown, Jr. is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he also teaches in the Digital Studies program. His teaching and research focus on rhetoric, writing, new media, and software studies. You can find more information about his research and teaching at his homepage or on his blog.
 
 
Eddie Lee is a researcher at the intersection of physics and society--using lessons from physical models, ideas, intuitions to look for general principles in human behavior. Currently, he is a Research Associate at the Center for Complexity and Collective Computation in the Institute for Discovery at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. You can find out more about him at his website.

 

Snow in Wisconsin Student Conference

Snow in Wisconsin Student Conference

Nobel Prize-Winning Author of Snow

Great World Text Student Conference with Orhan Pamuk Monday, December 2, 2013 @ 8:30am Union South

During the 2013-2014 academic year, high school and college classes from across the state will participate in reading Orhan Pamuk's novel, Snow. Educators will attend two colloquia, on September 9 and 10, 2013 and on March 31, 2014 where they will receive an Educator's Guide to Teaching Snow, hear talks from UW-Madison experts on the text and its contexts, and collaborate to plan their curricula.

A student conference will take place on December 2, 2013, where students will present their work, participate in workshop activities, and engage in conversation with students from around the state.  They will also have opportunity to engage directly with the author, Orhan Pamuk, who will present a keynote at 11:00 A.M.

Publishing in the Humanities: Projects, Proposals, Pragmatics

Publishing in the Humanities: Projects, Proposals, Pragmatics

Panel Discussion Thursday, November 14, 2013 @ 4:00pm Banquet Room, University Club

Working on your first book? Second book? Submitting essays to referred journals? Have questions about the publishing process and/or the state of academic publishing?

Join editors from Fordham University Press and the University of Wisconsin Press along with members of UW-Madison faculty to discuss publishing issues. The workshop will begin with brief presentations by Helen Tartar (Editorial Director, Fordham UP), Gwen Walker (Editorial Director, UW Press), Steve Stern (Alberto Flores Galindo and Hilldale Professor of History, Vice Provost for Faculty and Staff; co-editor of the book series "Critical Human Rights" through UW Press) and Preeti Chopra (Associate Professor, Art History and Director of the Center for Visual Cultures, UW-Madison). Moderated by Susan Stanford Friedman (Director, Institute for Research in the Humanities; founding co-editor of Contemporary Women's Writing, an Oxford UP journal). 

Issues for Discussion:
Book Publication: From dissertation to book; press selection and review process; book prospectus; contracts; exclusive versus multiple submissions; timing of submission; review process; manuscript and press board readers; implications for job market and promotion; prepublication of chapters as articles; impact of digital revolution on publication.
Journal and Book Chapter Publication: Journal versus book chapter decisions; hard-copy versus on-line journals; journal selection; review process; revise and resubmit responses; relationship to job/promotion; relation to book projects.

Sponsored by the Institute for Research in the Humanities and the Center for the Humanities; co-sponsored by the University of Wisconsin Press.

Humanities Hackathon with David Mimno

Humanities Hackathon with David Mimno

Text Mining with the MALLET Toolkit Thursday, November 7, 2013 @ 3:00pm 3rd Floor Teaching Lab, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, 330 North Orchard Street

The Humanities Hackathon, an ongoing collaboration between the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and the Center for the Humanities, investigates computational techniques from the sciences with humanities scholars to uncover unexpected connections and intriguing patterns in music, visual art, literature, and historical works.

Monthly "hacks" bridge the gap between seemingly unrelated disciplines and enrich discussions about transdiciplinary work. Meetings consist of roughly one hour of presentations and discussion, followed by an hour of lab time, where participants can share projects, trade ideas, run programs, and receive support for softward and techniques.

Register to reserve your spot

Build conversation with the Twitter hashtag #HumanitiesHack

Accessing the Discovery Building for WID events

Questions? Send WID's events team an email or call (608) 316-4676.

Please bring a laptop with R (Windows, Mac) or RStudio and the "mallet" R package already installed.

If you have any questions or concerns, please send the WID events team an email or call (608) 316-4676.

Scholarly Methodologies and Large-Scale Topic Analysis

In the last ten years we have seen the creation of massive digital text collections, from Twitter feeds to million-book libraries. At the same time, researchers have developed text mining methods that go beyond simple word frequency analysis to uncover thematic patterns. This workshop will include both an explanation of how to use text as data, as well as a practical hands-on session using the Mallet text mining toolkit. But models are not enough. When we combine big data with powerful algorithms, we can enhance qualitative perspectives with quantitative measurements. But these methods are only useful if we distinguish consistent patterns from random variations. In this talk I will describe my work building reliable topic-mining methodologies for humanists, with examples from a corpus of 4000 19th century novels.

David Mimno is an assistant professor in the Information Science department at Cornell University. His research is on developing machine learning models and algorithms, with a particular focus on applications in Humanities and Social Science. He received his BA in Classics and Computer Science from Swarthmore College and PhD in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He was a CRA Computing Innovation fellow at Princeton University. Before graduate school, he served as Head Programmer at the Perseus Project, a digital library for cultural heritage materials, at Tufts University. Mimno is currently chief architect for the MALLET machine learning toolkit.

David Mimno's visit is sponsored by the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery in partnership with the Humanities Research Bridge of the UW-Madison Libraries. 

John Hawks

John Hawks

Professor of Anthropology, UW-Madison

Are We the Last Neanderthals? Saturday, November 2, 2013 @ 2:00pm Chicago History Museum

Neanderthals fascinate us: so much like us, yet not quite us. We have long known that they overlapped with modern humans in prehistoric Europe, but recent genetic evidence suggests widespread interbreeding of the two groups. Biological anthropologist John Hawks is at the forefront of this species-shaking research. He presents the latest findings from the lab and field and discusses what may or may not make us uniquely human.

John Hawks is an expert on human evolution and genetics, best known for his work demonstrating the recent rapid evolution of humans within the past 10,000 years; and for exploring the contribution of ancient Neandertals to the ancestry of people living today. He has done fieldwork in Africa, Asia and Europe, combining skeletal evidence from fossils with new information from genetics to uncover how humans evolved. His weblog is one of the top international resources on human evolution and genetics.

This program is presented by the Center for the Humanities in partnership with the Institute for Research in the Humanities and the 2013 Chicago Humanities Festival. This is a ticketed event.

About the Chicago History Museum.

Ruth Ozeki

Ruth Ozeki

Novelist, Filmmaker, and Zen Buddhist Priest

A Tale for the Time Being Monday, October 28, 2013 @ 7:00pm Varsity Hall at Union South

This year's Go Big Read selection, A Tale for the Time Being is a powerful story about the ways in which reading and writing connect two people who will never meet. Spanning the planet from Tokyo’s Electric Town to Desolation Sound, British Columbia, and connected by the great Pacific gyres, A Tale for the Time Being tells the story of a diary, washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox, and the profound effect it has on the woman who discovers it.

More information at http://www.gobigread.wisc.edu/

Public History/Public Criticism

Public History/Public Criticism

A Conversation with Jill Lepore and Robert Storr Friday, October 25, 2013 @ 10:00am 4th Floor Multipurpose Room, UW Hillel Foundation Building

Join New Yorker essayist Jill Lepore and curator and critic Robert Storr for an informal conversation about writing beyond academia.
 
Free and open to the public.  Directions, parking, and accessibility information for the UW Hillel Foundation building here.
  
 
Jill Lepore (David Woods Kemper '41 Professor of American History, Harvard University) is an award-winning scholar of early American History, staff writer at The New Yorker, and the author of numerous books and essays.
 
Robert Storr is an artist, critic, and curator who has shaped our perceptions of contemporary art for more than two decades. He has written definitive essays on Gerhard Richter, Chuck Close, Louise Bourgeois, and many others. From 1990-2002 he was curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, NY and in 2007 was the first American to direct the Venice Biennale.
Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen & Steven Nadler

Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen & Steven Nadler

Philosophical Portraits: Descartes and Nietzsche Thursday, October 17, 2013 @ 5:30pm Central Branch, Madison Public Library (201 West Mifflin Street)

A historian and philosopher reflect on the lives and afterlives of two thinkers who mark the beginning and end of modern philosophy.

Presented in partnership with the 2013 Wisconsin Book Festival. Moderated by Steve Paulson of Wisconsin Public Radio.

 

Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen is Merle Curti Associate Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and author of American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas (University of Chicago Press, 2012). Her research examines US intellectual and cultural history, with a focus on the transatlantic flow of ideas and cultural movements. She publishes widely, with a number of essays and reviews for The Wilson Quarterly, Daedalus, The American Prospect, and the Guardian blog. She is currently working on a book on the search for wisdom and wonder in 20th-century American life.

Steven Nadler is William H. Hay II Professor of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and author of The Philosopher, the Priest, and the Painter: A Portrait of Descartes (Princeton University Press, 2013). Nadler received his PhD in philosophy from Columbia University in 1986 and has been teaching at UW-Madison since 1988. His other books include Spinoza: A Life (Cambridge, 1999, winner of the Koret Jewish Book Award); Rembrandt's Jews (Chicago, 2003, named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize); The Best of All Possible Worlds: A Story of Philosophers, God, and Evil (Princeton, 2010); A Book Forged in Hell: Spinoza's Scandalous Treatise and the Birth of the Secular Age (Princeton, 2011). He is also the editor of the Journal of the History of Philosophy. 

More about Nadler's talk: Sometime in 1649, Frans Hals, the great seventeenth-century Dutch artist, painted a small, rough portrait of René Descartes, the great seventeenth-century French philosopher who spent most of his adult life in the Netherlands -- or so it seems. But where is the picture that Hals allegedly painted? And what were the circumstances that may have brought these two giants of the Dutch Golden Age together?

UW Faculty

UW Faculty

English and Asian-American Studies

A Tale for the Time Being: A Panel Discussion Tuesday, October 15, 2013 @ 2:42pm Room 460 Memorial Library (Note: a photo ID is required for entry to the library.)

UW-Madison faculty share perspectives on Ruth Ozeki's A Tale for the Time Being, this year's Go Big Read selection.

Speakers include: Timothy Yu, Associate Professor of English and Asian American Studies and Director, Asian American Studies Program; Leslie Bow, Professor of English and Asian American Studies; Morris Young, Professor of English; and Jan Miyasaki, Lecturer in Asian American Studies. Join us for refreshments after the event.

The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided after the panel. Please note that a photo id is required to enter Memorial Library.

Contact: gobigread@library.wisc.edu, 608-262-4308

This event is sponsored by the Asian American Studies Program, the English Department, the Center for the Humanities, Go Big Read, and Memorial Library.

John Hawks

John Hawks

Professor of Anthropology, UW-Madison

Booting Up Humanity Saturday, September 28, 2013 @ 3:30pm Marquee Theater, Union South

The origin of our species was surprisingly complex. We have within us the genes of ancient Africans, Neandertals, and a mysterious population known as the Denisovans. Only a relative handful of genetic changes mark humans today as different from these ancient people. So how did the characteristics of modern humans, including complex social systems, symbolic thought, and language, evolve? New discoveries point in a surprising direction: Modern humans used a diversity of genes in a common social environment to bootstrap themselves to humanity. WIth the origin of modern human behavior, cultural evolution began to direct our genetic evolution, with rapid and unprecedented results. 
 
John Hawks is an expert on human evolution and genetics, best known for his work demonstrating the recent rapid evolution of humans within the past 10,000 years; and for exploring the contribution of ancient Neandertals to the ancestry of people living today. He has done fieldwork in Africa, Asia and Europe, combining skeletal evidence from fossils with new information from genetics to uncover how humans evolved. His weblog is one of the top international resources on human evolution and genetics.
 
This talk is presented by the Center as part of the 2013 Wisconsin Science Festival.
 
Directions, accessibility, and parking for Union South.
Humanities Hackathon with Martin Foys

Humanities Hackathon with Martin Foys

Senior Lecturer, Kings College, London & Associate Professor of English, Drew University; Co-Director of the Digital Mappaemundi Project

Small Data in a Big Way: Customizing Linked Data in Medieval Maps and Manuscripts Monday, September 23, 2013 @ 3:30pm 3rd Floor Teaching Lab, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, 330 North Orchard Street

This workshop will explore the functionality of the DM Project (dm.drew.edu), a developing on-line environment to allow scholars to collect and annotate digital images and texts collaboratively. In particular, DM emphasizes the continuing need within digital humanities resources for scholars to be able to generate bespoke scholarship - custom and targeted linked data of moments within images and texts - across large collections.  Through the Virtual Mappa Project (VMP) - a partnership between the DM Project and the British Library focussed on medieval maps of the world -  we will look at the DM Project's new multi-up working environment, with innovative methods for managing the display, selection and annotation of several manuscript images and transcribed texts simultaneously.  We'll also review newly completed work for exporting the linked data created by users in Open Annotation Collaboration (OAC) compliant XML and RDF-triple formats, and touch on a few other medieval manuscript projects using DM, ranging from the institutional to the individual in scale. Finally, we'll discuss the next phase of work already in development - establishing customizable collections of such annotated data, drawn from manuscript manifests hosted across multiple institutional repositories. During the presentation and discussion, a sandbox of the Virtual Mappa Project will be publicly available for hands-on experience of DM features.

This event is part of the Humanites Hackathon Series. Investigating computational techniques from the sciences with humanities scholars, the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and the Center for the Humanities seek to uncover unexpected connections and intriguing patterns in music, visual art, literature and historical works. The Humanities Hackathon bridges the gap between seemingly unrelated disciplines and enriches discussions about transdisciplinary work.

Meetings consist of roughly one hour of presentations and discussion, followed by an hour of lab time, where participants can share projects, trade ideas, run programs, and receive support for software and techniques.

Registration requested, but not required. Register here. More information about location and accessing the WID labs here.

Martin K. Foys is a Senior Lecturer in Pre-1300 English at King's College, London and an Associate Professor of English at Drew University.

Major publications include the Bayeux Tapestry Digital Edition (2003),  Virtually Anglo-Saxon: Old Media, New Media, and Early Medieval Studies in the Late Age of Print (2007), and Bayeux Tapestry: New Interpretations (2009). Martin is a founding board member of the Digital Medievalist resource, and has served as a member of the consultative group for the Parker Library on the Web project and a member of the Medieval Academy of America's Committee on Electronic Resources. He also co-directs the DM project (http://dm.drew.edu), a digital resource for the open annotation of medieval images and texts funded by the NEH and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Outside the digital humanities, the core of Martin's research concerns pre- and post-Conquest England, with special attention to the intersection of literature and other visual, material and media modes of cultural expression – e.g. maps, tapestries and sculpture, and, most recently, more ephemeral and abstracted aspects of Anglo-Saxon expressive production – auditory culture, technological alteration of bodies, transliteracies and ecologies of media forms, and the process of temporal decay or obsolescence. Recent work includes an essay on "Media" for the Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Studies (2012), and co-editing a volume of articles on "Becoming Media" for the journal postmedieval (2012),  for which submissions were also vetted through an experimental on-line crowd review. He is currently at work on a book on the nature of Anglo-Saxon media, as well as editing a set of early medieval maps for the Virtual Mappa Project, in partnership with the British Library. Martin is also the Executive Director of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists.