Research Seminars & Workshops
Borghesi-Mellon Workshops

Borghesi-Mellon Workshops

Please note that not all of these events are open to the public, and some may require an RSVP. More information about workshop topics and leadership can be found here. Borghesi-Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities events are supported by Nancy and David Borghesi and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Upcoming Events

Alicia Rios & Antoni Miralda Food Studies Network

Week-long residency

Alicia Rios & Antoni Miralda
Artists

Wednesday, April 26 through Saturday, April 29 Varies

ALICIA RIOS + ANTONI MIRALDA

LECTURE AND DISCUSSION

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26 @ 4:30PM

ELVEHJEM L160

 

WORKSHOP AND PERFORMANCE

THURSDAY, APRIL 27 – SATURDAY, APRIL 29

WORKSHOP APPLICATION

The Center for Visual Cultures and the Food Studies Network present a week-long series of events with two internationally acclaimed artists from Spain who work with food:

Alicia Rios creates multi-sensory works that require the public’s participation, where reality is reinterpreted through food and devoured collectively. Her collective Ali&Cia has produced edible greenhouses, libraries and entire cities and islands, staged for up to four thousand people. Rios is also one of the leading Spanish experts on tasting olive oil, has written several cookbooks, and publishes regularly on culinary themes. Information about her work can be found at: http://www.alicia-rios.com/

Antoni Miralda explores the foods of many different cultures in projects that are edible anthropologies and conceptual propositions. He has made shrines in food markets and ritualistic ceremonial banquets. His FoodCultura Museum is a collection of devices and strategies that question common museum protocols to examine and foster participation in culinary cultures from around the world. Miralda currently has a permanent stall at La Boqueria, the largest permanent food market in Spain.  His work was recently featured in the Spanish Pavilion of the Milan Expo and will be part of the upcoming Venice Biennale. Information about his work can be found at: http://www.foodcultura.org/en/about/.

On Wednesday 26 April, Rios and Miralda will each lecture their individual oeuvres. Following a short break, there will be a moderated dialogue between the two about similarities and difference in their approaches and a discussion of their planning for the upcoming project. This symposium will take place in L160 Elvehjem Building (800 University Avenue) starting at 4:30 PM.

On Saturday 29 April, Rios and Miralda will produce their first collaborative project, a procession and mobile exhibition on the theme of food waste. 

Assistants and volunteers are needed to work with the artists throughout the week. On Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, Rios and Miralda will host public workshops in which participants will collect materials, devise props and costumes, and eventually help to construct a mobile museum and procession. To participate, please complete the form at this link.

 

For more information about these events, contact foodstudiesnetwork@gmail.com.

These events are funded by the Anonymous Fund of the College of Letters & Science, Jay and Ruth Halls Visiting Scholar Fund, Borghesi-Mellon Workshops, and Spatula&Barcode. Co-sponsoring units include the Center for Humanities, Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies, Design Studies, Art History, Spanish and Portuguese, and the University Lectures Committee.

Past Events

Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Public Symposium

Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Friday, April 28, 2017
1:00pm - 6:30pm
Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Room L150

Presented by The Medieval Studies Symposium in conjunction with Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages. 

Historical and Theological Perspectives on Medieval Science

1:00-1:30: William Courtenay (Professor Emeritus, History) "Science among University Theologians."

1:30-2:00:  Mike Shank, (Professor Emeritus, History of Science) “From Necessities to Possibilities: The Place of the Later Latin Middle Ages in the History of Science

Measuring Science and Morality

2:00-2:30: Lisa H. Cooper (Associate Professor, English), “From ‘Oure Orizonte’ to ‘All the World’: The Forms of Chaucer’s Treatise on the Astrolabe

2:30-3:00: Nicholas Jacobson (Ph.D. Candidate, History of Science), "'Masters of Discipline': Market Censorship and the Mathematics of Morality in Twelfth-Century Andalusia."

3:00-3:15 BREAK

Medieval Arts of Medicine

3:15-3:45: Walton Schalick (Physician Supervisor at Central Wisconsin Center, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine), “‘Wondrous Waters’: Marvelous Medicine in the Middle Ages.”

3:45-4:15:  Peter Bovenmyer (Ph.D. Candidate, Art History; Editor, History of Cartography Project), “The Body Inscribed: Monastic Anatomy and the Epistemic Image in the Twelfth Century.”

4:15-4:45:  Leah Pope (Ph.D. Candidate, English), “Blindne on þis dimme hol: Metaphors of Disability in the Old English Boethius

KEYNOTE

5:00-6:30: Robert Morrison (Religion/History of Science, Bowdoin College)  “An Economy of Scholarly Exchange.”

Christine Ehrick Sound Studies

Embodying Voices, Gendering Sound

Christine Ehrick
Associate Professor of History, University of Louisville

Friday, April 28, 2017
10:00am - 11:30am
University Club 212

In this discussion session, Ehrick will draw on her research on women’s voices in radio to spark a larger conversation on voice/sound and gender. How does sound complicate the way we think about gender, and how does gender inform our understanding of sound? While Ehrick’s research focuses on radio in South America, the discussion will consider voice and gender more broadly, thinking about the ways voices shake up the soundscape and calling our attention to the sonic dimensions of gender and the gendered dimensions of sound.

Christine Ehrick is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Louisville. Her second book, Radio and the Gendered Soundscape: Women and Broadcasting in Argentina and Uruguay, 1930-1950, was published in 2015 by Cambridge University Press.  She continues to research women’s voices and vocal gender, along with the history of “border radio” in the Río de la Plata. She is also currently the Communications Director for the Library of Congress’s Radio Preservation Task Force.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Cindi Katz Applied Comics Kitchen!

"Feel"ed Work

Cindi Katz
Professor of Geography in Environmental Psychology and Women’s Studies, CUNY Grad Center

Thursday, April 27, 2017
4:00pm - 6:00pm
6131 Humanities Building. Note: Registration is required.

This generative workshop zooms in on the excesses of research, the parts of research that are often considered not academic enough or excluded from scholarly conversations. Participants will be guided through a series of activities involving making comic strips from their own research experience.

This free workshop is open to the public.

Cindi's visit is co-sponsored by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Geography.

Cindi Katz is Professor of Geography in Environmental Psychology and Women’s Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Her work concerns social reproduction and the production of space, place and nature; children and the environment, and the consequences of global economic restructuring for everyday life. She has published widely on these themes as well as on social theory and the politics of knowledge in edited collections and in journals such as Society and Space, Social Text, Signs, Feminist Studies, Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Social Justice, and Antipode. She is the editor (with Janice Monk) of Full Circles: Geographies of Gender over the Life Course (Routledge 1993) and of Life’s Work: Geographies of Social Reproduction (with Sallie Marston and Katharyne Mitchell) (Blackwell 2004). She completed Growing up Global: Economic Restructuring and Children’s Everyday Lives with University of Minnesota Press in 2004. In 2013, she published "Playing with fieldwork", a journal article about and including making comics as part of research.

Registration is required.

Christine Ehrick Sound Studies

Vocal(izing) Gender: Women’s Golden Age Radio Voices in Argentina and Uruguay

Christine Ehrick
Associate Professor of History, University of Louisville

Thursday, April 27, 2017
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Vilas 3155

By the early 1930s, the South American cities of Buenos Aires, Argentina and Montevideo, Uruguay were home to important, vibrant, and overlapping commercial radio markets. Here as elsewhere, female radio voices were both prominent and controversial.  Most have heard of Argentine First Lady Eva “Evita” Perón, and many know that she got her start on radio. But “Evita” did not emerge in a vacuum: hers was one of many ways female voices populating the “ether” in the region during this era.  Following a brief overview of women’s vocal presence on airwaves of the region – including a discussion of the hemisphere’s first “all-woman” commercial radio station, Radio Femenina – this presentation will then focus on how this history informs our understanding of vocal gender and the female voice as a category of historical analysis.  Attentions to the voice as a sonic performance of gender underscores the ways gender and sound are mutually constitutive, with important implications for our understanding larger concepts such as modernity, citizenship, and the public sphere. 

Christine Ehrick is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Louisville. Her second book, Radio and the Gendered Soundscape: Women and Broadcasting in Argentina and Uruguay, 1930-1950, was published in 2015 by Cambridge University Press.  She continues to research women’s voices and vocal gender, along with the history of “border radio” in the Río de la Plata. She is also currently the Communications Director for the Library of Congress’s Radio Preservation Task Force.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Alicia Rios & Antoni Miralda Food Studies Network

Week-long residency

Alicia Rios & Antoni Miralda
Artists

Wednesday, April 26 through Saturday, April 29 Varies

ALICIA RIOS + ANTONI MIRALDA

LECTURE AND DISCUSSION

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26 @ 4:30PM

ELVEHJEM L160

 

WORKSHOP AND PERFORMANCE

THURSDAY, APRIL 27 – SATURDAY, APRIL 29

WORKSHOP APPLICATION

The Center for Visual Cultures and the Food Studies Network present a week-long series of events with two internationally acclaimed artists from Spain who work with food:

Alicia Rios creates multi-sensory works that require the public’s participation, where reality is reinterpreted through food and devoured collectively. Her collective Ali&Cia has produced edible greenhouses, libraries and entire cities and islands, staged for up to four thousand people. Rios is also one of the leading Spanish experts on tasting olive oil, has written several cookbooks, and publishes regularly on culinary themes. Information about her work can be found at: http://www.alicia-rios.com/

Antoni Miralda explores the foods of many different cultures in projects that are edible anthropologies and conceptual propositions. He has made shrines in food markets and ritualistic ceremonial banquets. His FoodCultura Museum is a collection of devices and strategies that question common museum protocols to examine and foster participation in culinary cultures from around the world. Miralda currently has a permanent stall at La Boqueria, the largest permanent food market in Spain.  His work was recently featured in the Spanish Pavilion of the Milan Expo and will be part of the upcoming Venice Biennale. Information about his work can be found at: http://www.foodcultura.org/en/about/.

On Wednesday 26 April, Rios and Miralda will each lecture their individual oeuvres. Following a short break, there will be a moderated dialogue between the two about similarities and difference in their approaches and a discussion of their planning for the upcoming project. This symposium will take place in L160 Elvehjem Building (800 University Avenue) starting at 4:30 PM.

On Saturday 29 April, Rios and Miralda will produce their first collaborative project, a procession and mobile exhibition on the theme of food waste. 

Assistants and volunteers are needed to work with the artists throughout the week. On Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, Rios and Miralda will host public workshops in which participants will collect materials, devise props and costumes, and eventually help to construct a mobile museum and procession. To participate, please complete the form at this link.

 

For more information about these events, contact foodstudiesnetwork@gmail.com.

These events are funded by the Anonymous Fund of the College of Letters & Science, Jay and Ruth Halls Visiting Scholar Fund, Borghesi-Mellon Workshops, and Spatula&Barcode. Co-sponsoring units include the Center for Humanities, Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies, Design Studies, Art History, Spanish and Portuguese, and the University Lectures Committee.

Various Food Studies Network

Faculty Research Forum

Various

Friday, April 14, 2017
9:00am - 1:00pm
126 Memorial Library, 728 State Street

An interdisciplinary program showcasing artists, humanists, scientists, and social scientists who study food across campus. Followed by an optional lunch.

PRESENTERS:

Eve Emshwiller BOTANY; Greg Lawless UW COOPERATIVE EXTENSION; Julie Dawson HORTICULTURE; Irwin Goldman HORTICULTURE; Laurie Beth Clark ART; Michael Peterson ART; Michael Bell SOCIOLOGY; Monica White COMMUNITY & ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY; additional presenters to be announced.

DISCUSSANTS include:

Grazia Menechella FRENCH & ITALIAN and Meg Mitchell ART

Adam Sachs Sound Studies

Reformatting an Industry: The Rise Podcasting as a Cultural Form and a Business Opportunity

Adam Sachs
Entrepreneur In Residence at The Chernin Group

Thursday, April 13, 2017
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Elvehjem L140

Ever since the term “podcasting” was selected as the word of the year in 2005 by the New Oxford American Dictionary, podcasting has been full of promise, as both a cultural form and a new media industry. But it took until Serial’s break out in 2014 as the fastest-downloaded podcast ever and the emergence of a ‘‘thriving mini-industry’’ made up of advertisers, venture capitalists, and tech start-ups to spark renewed attention to this not-so-new media form. While it has come a long way since its humble beginnings as a largely amateur and hobbyist activity, podcasting still sits uneasily at the intersection of professionalized industry and critical and accessible public outlet for new voices. In this talk, Adam Sachs, former CEO of Midroll Media and founder/host of the Wolf Den podcast, will discuss his experiences in this burgeoning industry, and the implications it has for free-enterprise in the United States. Sachs will address questions such as: “How has increasing industrialization affected podcasting over the last decade?”, “How has podcasting’s professionalization affected its cultural impact and potential?” and “What does the future of podcasting look like?”

Adam Sachs is currently the Entrepreneur in Residence at The Chernin Group and the former CEO of Midroll Media, a leading podcast network that produces and monetizes some of the world’s most popular podcasts, including "WTF with Marc Maron" and "Comedy Bang! Bang!” Midroll is the parent company of Earwolf, home to top-ranked comedy podcasts, the recently launched "Katie Couric", and the country’s top parenting show, “The Longest Shortest Time.” Sachs led the business through bootstrapped growth and innovation, including the launch of the podcast industry’s first premium subscription service, howl.fm, and he hosted his own podcast, “The Wolf Den,” about the future of podcasting and digital media. He was named one of Inc. Magazine’s top “30 Entrepreneurs Under 30” in 2011.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Adam Sachs Sound Studies

Saving New Sounds: Preserving Podcasts

Adam Sachs
Entrepreneur In Residence at The Chernin Group

Thursday, April 13, 2017
1:00pm - 2:15pm
Vilas Hall 4070

We are, as commentators have noted, in the midst of a “Golden Age of Podcasts”; a moment where the choice for quality digital audio abounds, and where new voices and listeners connect daily through earbuds, car stereos, home speakers or office computers. Podcasting is just over 10 years old, but it has ushered in an explosion of amateur and professional cultural production. However, this new format is shockingly vulnerable; podcast feeds end abruptly, cease to be maintained, or become housed in proprietary databases, like iTunes, which are difficult to search with any rigor. As the industry grows in popularity, professionalization and commercialization also threaten to streamline production and limit podcasting’s democratic diversity and accessibility. In this talk, Adam Sachs, former CEO of Midroll Media and founder/host of the Wolf Den podcast will join a panel featuring Dr. Jeremy Morris (UW-Madison) and Dana Gerber-Margie (Editor of the Bello Collective and A/V Archivist) to discuss the importance of preserving podcasting’s history and the challenges faced when archiving digital objects.

Adam Sachs is currently the Entrepreneur in Residence at The Chernin Group and the former CEO of Midroll Media, a leading podcast network that produces and monetizes some of the world’s most popular podcasts, including "WTF with Marc Maron" and "Comedy Bang! Bang!” Midroll is the parent company of Earwolf, home to top-ranked comedy podcasts, the recently launched "Katie Couric", and the country’s top parenting show, “The Longest Shortest Time.” Sachs led the business through bootstrapped growth and innovation, including the launch of the podcast industry’s first premium subscription service, howl.fm, and he hosted his own podcast, “The Wolf Den,” about the future of podcasting and digital media. He was named one of Inc. Magazine’s top “30 Entrepreneurs Under 30” in 2011.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

John Jennings Applied Comics Kitchen!

[Canceled] Black Comix, Social Justice, and Visual Ideologies

John Jennings
Professor of Media and Cultural Studies, University of California-Riverside

Thursday, April 6, 2017
1:00pm - 3:30pm
6131 Humanities Building. Note: Registration is required.

Please note that this event is canceled.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Applied Comics Kitchen!

William deBuys Terra Incognita Art Series

Not Shutting Down: Staying Engaged in an Era of Environmental Loss (a Center for Culture, History and Environment Colloquium)

William deBuys
Author and Historian

Wednesday, April 5, 2017
12:00pm - 1:00pm
Helen C. White 7191

More information about the Center for Culture, History, and Environment Colloquium here: https://nelson.wisc.edu/che/events/colloquium/index.php

In addition to the colloquium, deBuys will be leading a workshop, "Writing Environmental Stories: Strategies for Keeping it New," Saturday April 8th as part of a daylong writing retreat. Limited spots available, please email if you would like to register: terra.incognita.art@gmail.com 

To celebrate the making of The Colorado, we are bringing Director, Murat Eyuboglu, and collaborators William Brittelle and William deBuys. Check out corresponding events April 2, April 4, April 5, April 8.

William deBuys’s eight books include The Last Unicorn: A Search for One of Earth’s Rarest Creatures (listed by the Christian Science Monitor as one of the ten best non-fiction books of 2015), A Great Aridness: Climate Change and the Future of the American West (2011), The Walk (2008), Seeing Things Whole: The Essential John Wesley Powell (2001), Salt Dreams (1999), and River of Traps (a 1991 Pulitzer finalist). His first book, Enchantment and Exploitation (1985), was recently reissued in a revised and expanded 30th -anniversary edition. He was a 2008-2009 Guggenheim Fellow. His conservation work over many years has included land acquisition, river protection, and grass banking. From 2001 to 2005, he chaired the Valles Caldera Trust, which then administered the 89,000-acre Valles Caldera National Preserve in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. He serves on the advisory board of the Liz Claiborne Art Ortenberg Foundation and lives and writes on a small farm in northern New Mexico that he has tended since the 1970s.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Center for Culture, History and Environment; Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; Arts + Literature Laboratory; Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Mead Witter School of Music; Wisconsin Film Festival.

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

William Brittelle Terra Incognita Art Series

Post-Genre Music Composition

William Brittelle
Composer and Musician

Monday, April 3, 2017 @ 7:00pm Humanities Building 2541

Please join us for William Brittelle’s artist talk, co-sponsored by the Mead Witter School of Music. To celebrate the making of The Coloradowe are bringing Director, Murat Eyuboglu, and collaborators William Brittelle and William deBuys. Check out corresponding events April 2, April 4, April 5, April 8.

Brittelle is a composer, formerly on the faculty of Mannes Conservatory. His work has been acclaimed by All Things Considered, New York Times, Time Out NY, Los Angeles Times, and The Believer and commissioned by Seattle Symphony and Indianapolis Symphony, to name a few. He co-directs New Amsterdam Presents, a record label and presenting organization.

There will be a corresponding showing in the Wisconsin Film Festival of The Colorado, a film based on William deBuys's book Salt Dreams (1999). Brittelle contributed compositions to the soundtrack, which his label, New Amsterdam, released. He will be at the film to co-lead a post-film Q&A.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Center for Culture, History and Environment; Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; Arts + Literature Laboratory; Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Mead Witter School of Music; Wisconsin Film Festival. 

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Nestle, Brittelle, Joel Shanahan Terra Incognita Art Series

Performance

Nestle, Brittelle, Joel Shanahan

Sunday, April 2, 2017 @ 8:00pm Arts + Literature Laboratory, 2021 Winnebago St.

*This is a ticketed Arts + Literature Laboratory event. $7 at the door. Doors open at 7:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m.*

Madison trio Nestle, Brooklyn-based electro-acoustic composer William Brittelle, and producer/synth wizard Joel Shanahan (goldendonna.bandcamp.com). 

More information at: http://artlitlab.org/events/nestle-william-brittelle-joel-shanahan

To celebrate the making of The Colorado, we are bringing Director, Murat Eyuboglu, and collaborators William Brittelle and William deBuys. Please check out corresponding events April 2, April 4, April 5, April 8.

William Brittelle is a North Carolina-born, Brooklyn-based composer of post-genre electro-acoustic music. His work is increasingly multi-disciplinary and often focuses on the intersection of music, technology, environmentalism, and secular spirituality. Current projects include elements of film, performance art, poetry, and ritualism, and often center on the exploration of altered states of being. His compositional style is characterized by a refusal to acknowledge traditional genre boundaries, a trait perhaps most evident in his most recent commercial releases: the digital single Dream Has No Sacrifice (featuring Jenn Wasner on vocals) and the full album Loving the Chambered Nautilus. Written specifically for the players of ACME (the American Contemporary Music Ensemble), Nautilus is a series of electro-acoustic chamber music pieces melding classic synthesizer sounds and drum programming with virtuosic and textured acoustic strings. The album has been hailed as a hallmark of the next wave of classical composition. Following an All Things Considered feature, Nautilus hit #1 on Amazon’s Classical Music Chart. The New York Times labeled the work “bright and joyous”, and MUSO dubbed it “a fast, fun, freedom-fuelled flurry of a record”. Perhaps most powerfully, Classical TV stated: “William Brittelle is creating a body of work that has no precedent, and marks him as a one of the most promising heirs of the vital American maverick tradition.” Amid the Minotaurs, a piece commissioned and premiered by Roomful of Teeth, was featured on the group's Grammy-winning debut album. More information about Brittelle here: http://artlitlab.org/events/nestle-william-brittelle-joel-shanahan

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Center for Culture, History and Environment; Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; Arts + Literature Laboratory; Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Mead Witter School of Music; Wisconsin Film Festival. 

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Murat Eyuboglu Terra Incognita Art Series

The Colorado screening and post-film Q&A

Murat Eyuboglu
Director, The Colorado

Sunday, April 2, 2017 @ 4:00pm Marquee Theater, Union South.

*This event is ticketed. Tickets on sale @ http://wifilmfest.org/2017/guide.htm#Event=16984*

The Colorado is a film about the NORTH AMERICAN WEST. A musical tribute to LAND and WATER. A cautionary tale about the ENVIRONMENT. The Colorado is a feature documentary that is both narrated and sung, a live performance, and a comprehensive educational resource. It explores the Colorado River Basin from a holistic perspective and places the ecological predicaments of the region in a rich social and historical context. We believe that effective stewardship of land and water begins with love and knowledge and continues with dedicated activism. The Colorado is designed to inspire the love, instill the knowledge, and encourage the activism.

Narrated by the Oscar-nominee Mark Rylance, composed by five critically-acclaimed composers and sung by the Grammy-laureate vocal ensemble Roomful of Teeth, The Colorado explores topics ranging from the prehistoric settlements of the region to the current plight of the river’s delta region. Other sections cover crucial facets of the river’s history, such as the period of European exploration, the dam-building era and its legacy, industrial agriculture and immigration, as well as the impact of climate change on the region.

For this event, we are bringing Director, Murat Eyuboglu, and collaborators William Brittelle and William deBuys. Please check out corresponding events April 2, April 4, April 5, April 8.

Murat Eyuboglu is a professional photographer and videographer out of New York City, and the director The Colorado. He started photography as an apprentice to Josephine Powell in Istanbul. After attending the Academy of Fine Arts, School of Photography (Istanbul), he transferred to Bennington College, Vermont. He lived in Paris and returned to New York to pursue studies in music history. His dissertation was on the utopian aspects of Gustav Mahler’s works. Since 2000 he has focused mainly on portraiture and collaborative projects. In 2007, he also started working in film. He participated in the documentary Claude Lévi-Strauss: Return to the Amazon as assistant director. His photographs have been published by the French edition of National Geographic Magazine and his music videos have been released by Asthmatic Kitty Records and New Amsterdam Records. He lives in New York City.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Center for Culture, History and Environment; Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; Arts + Literature Laboratory; Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Mead Witter School of Music; Wisconsin Film Festival. 

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Oliver Baez Bendorf Applied Comics Kitchen!

Poetry Comics

Oliver Baez Bendorf
Poet, Cartoonist, Librarian, Teacher, Artist, Activist

Tuesday, March 28, 2017
1:00pm - 3:30am
6131 Humanities Building. Note: Registration is required.

Join ACK! for our spring 2017 kickoff generative workshop series!

Participants will learn how to make poetry comics and 'zines. Each person will produce a handmade comic with original drawings and poetry. This workshop is open to all students.

This workshop is co-sponsored by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's LGBT campus center.

Registration is required.

Registration Deadline is March 28th, 2017 @ 11am

Facilitator Bio: Oliver Baez Bendorf is a poet born and raised in the Midwest. His first poetry collection, The Spectral Wilderness, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wick Poetry Prize and published by Kent State University Press in 2015. Bendorf’s work has also appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Blackbird, The Feminist Wire, Indiana Review, The Rumpus, and Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics. He has received poetry fellowships from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Lambda Literary Foundation, and Vermont Studio Center.

Oliver is also a cartoonist, librarian, teaching artist, and activist. His teaching work with marginalized communities has been supported with funding from Poets & Writers, and his activist work on #PulseOrlandoSyllabus and Orlando Flyers was covered by news outlets such as Chronicle of Higher Ed, Ploughshares, Slate, and WLRN Miami. He is an alum of the University of Iowa and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he earned an MFA in Poetry and an MA in Library and Information Studies.

 

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Applied Comics Kitchen!

Melissa Clark Food Studies Network

Potluck with Melissa Clark

Melissa Clark
Food Writer

Friday, March 17, 2017
12:00pm - 2:00pm
Location TBA. NB: If interested in joining, contact foodstudiesnetwork@gmail.com

Following the Writing about Food roundtable, there is a lunch with Melissa Clark to celebrate her new book Dinner: Changing the Game (available 7 March)To participate, you must prepare a dish from the book for the group to share. If interested in joining, contact foodstudiesnetwork@gmail.com.

Author of more than 30 cookbooks, Melissa Clark writes a weekly food column for the New York Times called A Good Appetite. She has also written for Bon AppetitFood & WineEvery Day with Rachel Ray, and Martha Stewart, and has an MFA in writing from Columbia University.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Melissa Clark, Raphael Kadushin, and Michelle Wildgen Food Studies Network

Writing about Food

Melissa Clark, Raphael Kadushin, and Michelle Wildgen
moderated by Lindsay Christians

Friday, March 17, 2017
9:00am - 11:00am
Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, L140

Please join us for Writing about Food: A Roundtable with Melissa Clark, Raphael Kadushin, and Michelle Wildgen, moderated by Lindsay Christians

Following the roundtable, there is a lunch with Melissa Clark to celebrate her new book Dinner: Changing the Game. To participate, you must prepare a dish from the book for the group to share. If interested in joining, contact foodstudiesnetwork@gmail.com.

And don’t miss Melissa Clark’s public lecture on Thursday, 16 March at 7:30 PM at the Madison Public Library Central Branch (201 W. Mifflin).

Author of more than 30 cookbooks, Melissa Clark writes a weekly food column for The New York Times called “A Good Appetite.” She has also written for Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, Every Day with Rachel Ray, and Martha Stewart, and has an MFA in writing from Columbia University.

Raphael Kadushin is Executive Editor at the University of Wisconsin Press, where he oversees the fiction, film, dance, food, travel, classics, history and lgbt lists. He also works as a food and travel writer. He has served as a Contributing Editor at both Bon Appetit and National Geographic Traveler magazines and as a regular contributor to other outlets as well, including Conde Nast Traveler, Epicurious, Wall Street Journal, Out, Travel & Leisure, etc. His work has appeared multiple times in the Best Food Writing anthology and his fiction and travel/food journalism has been published in a range of anthologies; his own edited anthologies include Wonderlands: Good Gay Travel Writing and Big Trips.

Michelle Wildgen is the author of three novels, most recently Bread & Butter, and editor of the anthology Food & Booze: A Tin House Literary Feast. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times Book Review and Modern Love column, O, the Oprah Magazine, Best Food Writing, and other publications. In 2013, she cofounded the Madison Writer's Studio with novelist Susanna Daniel.

Since 2008, Lindsay Christians has been writing about fine arts and food for The Capital Times. She loves sitting at the bar, going to the theater, fine wine and good stories. She lives on the eastside with her husband, two cats and too many cookbooks.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Shawn Decker Sound Studies

The History of Sound as an Art – A 100 years’ Perspective

Shawn Decker
Composer, Artist, and Professor, Departments of Art and Technology and Sound, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Wednesday, March 15, 2017
3:30pm - 4:45pm
Lathrop Hall (1050 University Ave.) Room 138 (first floor)

In this lecture, Shawn Decker will present an overview of the development of the emerging genre known as “Sound Art” from its precedents in music and art in the early 20th century, through various strands of artistic sound practices today. Taken from the point of view of a practicing artist, this talk will feature examples of work from numerous influential artists that are widely seen as key contributors to this growing area of creative work.

Shawn Decker is a composer, artist, and Professor in the Art and Technology and Sound departments at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He creates sound and electronic media installations and writes music for live performance, film, and video. His work is positioned at the intersection of music composition, the visual arts, and performance, using physical and electronic media to investigate, simulate and praise the natural (and unnatural) worlds. His work spans multiple disciplines, making use of technology and technological processes on the one hand and incorporating traditional elements such as Irish and American folk fiddle-traditions on the other. He also explores the merging of physical elements and techniques from sculpture with environmental sound and music performance and views art and art-making within a very broad context. As a senior faculty member at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, education is another element within his broad-based practice, with teaching supporting artistic production, and vice-versa.

 

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Shawn Decker Sound Studies

Current Sound Art Installations of Shawn Decker

Shawn Decker
Composer, Artist, and Professor, Departments of Art and Technology and Sound, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Wednesday, March 15, 2017
11:00am - 12:00pm
313 University Club

In this seminar, Shawn Decker will present an overview of his sculptural and public-art sound installation work. His recent work approaches sound as a “material” and features kinetic and physical immersive sound environments, often in very large scales, as well as public-art collaborations and architectural sound installations.

Shawn Decker is a composer, artist, and Professor in the Art and Technology and Sound departments at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He creates sound and electronic media installations and writes music for live performance, film, and video. His work is positioned at the intersection of music composition, the visual arts, and performance, using physical and electronic media to investigate, simulate and praise the natural (and unnatural) worlds. His work spans multiple disciplines, making use of technology and technological processes on the one hand and incorporating traditional elements such as Irish and American folk fiddle-traditions on the other. He also explores the merging of physical elements and techniques from sculpture with environmental sound and music performance and views art and art-making within a very broad context. As a senior faculty member at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, education is another element within his broad-based practice, with teaching supporting artistic production, and vice-versa.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Jamey Stillings Terra Incognita Art Series

Evolution of Ivanpah Solar

Jamey Stillings
Photographer

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 @ 7:00pm Madison Public Library, 201 Mifflin St. (3rd floor)

In this new monograph, Evolution of Ivanpah Solar, Jamey Stillings synthesizes environmental interests with his longstanding fascination with the intersections of nature and human activity. Jamey Stillings Photographs are accompanied by a foreword by Robert Redford, introduction by Anne Tucker, and text by Bruce Barcott. In October 2010, Stillings began a three-and- a-half- year aerial exploration over what has become the world’s largest concentrated solar power plant, the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in the Mojave Desert of California. From the simple and stark terrain of the preconstruction landscape to the angular forms of the completed solar plant producing 392 megawatts of electricity on 14 square kilometers of public land, Stillings explores dynamic interactions between raw organic forms of nature and those defined by the projects precise geometric lines. Shot from a helicopter during first and last light, Stillings; black-and- white images intrigue with tight abstractions, oblique views of geologic and geometric forms, and broad open views of the dramatic desert basin.

Please join us for a book talk which will include images from the project.

Jamey Stillings (born 1955, USA) grew up in Oregon and lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Stilling’s career spans documentary, fine art and commercial assignments. He earned a BA in Art from Willamette University (1978) and an MFA in Photography from Rochester Institute of Technology (1982). A passionate interest in and curiosity about people, world cultures, ideas, technology and the environment are guiding forces in Jamey’s photography and life. In both assignment and personal project work, he draws on a diverse range of photographic skills and thirty years of experience, nationally and internationally, from shooting documentary work to creating highly produced conceptual imagery. His work is in the collections of the United States Library of Congress; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Nevada Museum of Art; UNLV Libraries, Special Collections; and private collections. Stillings' first monograph, The Bridge at Hoover Dam, was published in 2011 by Nazraeli Press.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Center for Culture, History and Environment, Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; The Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Arts and Literature Laboratory; Madison Public Library; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office.

This workshop is free and open to the public.

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Kenneth Bailey Food Studies Network

Workshop: Practicing Prefigurative Politics

Kenneth Bailey
Founder, Sector Organizing and Strategy Lead, DS4SI

Tuesday, March 7, 2017 @ 5:30pm Registration Required. Contact mykelly@wisc.edu

Registration Required. Contact mykelly@wisc.edu.

This interactive workshop will offer an opportunity for participants to see how DS4SI imagines its projects. Our hope is that participants leave with ideas that they intend to prototype.

Kenneth Bailey is an internationally recognized activist and independent scholar based in Boston, USA. He is the founder of The Design Studio for Social Intervention (DS4SI), an artistic research and development outfit for the improvement of civil society and everyday life situated at the intersections of design thinking and practice, social justice and activism, public art and social practice and civic / popular engagement.

These events are sponsored by the Art Department, the University Lectures Committee, and the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop. Co-sponsors include The Studio, Design Studies, Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies, the Center for Visual Cultures, and the Food Sovereignty Symposium and Festival.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Kenneth Bailey Food Studies Network

Brown Bag: Public Kitchen

Kenneth Bailey
Founder, Sector Organizing and Strategy Lead, DS4SI

Tuesday, March 7, 2017 @ 12:00pm Art Lofts Lounge, 111 N. Francis Street

If kitchens were public like schools or libraries, how would it change social life? Public Kitchen is one of DS4SI’s best known and loved interventions. We will explore its beginnings, discuss how it has been received both nationally and internationally, and consider its future.

Kenneth Bailey is an internationally recognized activist and independent scholar based in Boston, USA. He is the founder of The Design Studio for Social Intervention (DS4SI), an artistic research and development outfit for the improvement of civil society and everyday life situated at the intersections of design thinking and practice, social justice and activism, public art and social practice and civic / popular engagement.

These events are sponsored by the Art Department, the University Lectures Committee, and the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop. Co-sponsors include The Studio, Design Studies, Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies, the Center for Visual Cultures, and the Food Sovereignty Symposium and Festival.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Kenneth Bailey Food Studies Network

Public Lecture: DS4SI Survey

Kenneth Bailey
Founder, Sector Organizing and Strategy Lead, DS4SI

Monday, March 6, 2017 @ 5:00pm Elvehjem 140, 800 University Avenue

Prefigurative politics is the work of imagining and testing new social arrangements that point to new horizons for the political and the convivial. Kenneth Bailey shows how Design Studio for Social Intervention (DS4SI) engages in prefigurative politics and speaks to why this way of engaging in the political is needed now more than ever.

Kenneth Bailey is an internationally recognized activist and independent scholar based in Boston, USA. He is the founder of The Design Studio for Social Intervention (DS4SI), an artistic research and development outfit for the improvement of civil society and everyday life situated at the intersections of design thinking and practice, social justice and activism, public art and social practice and civic / popular engagement.

These events are sponsored by the Art Department, the University Lectures Committee, and the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop. Co-sponsors include The Studio, Design Studies, Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies, the Center for Visual Cultures, and the Food Sovereignty Symposium and Festival.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Food Studies Tours Food Studies Network

Food Studies Collections on Campus: Menus and Cookbooks

Food Studies Tours

Friday, March 3, 2017
9:00am - 12:00pm
Wisconsin Historical Society and Steenbock Library

Tour begins at 9 AM at the Wisconsin Historical Society (816 State Street) and continues at 10:30 AM at Steenbock Library (550 Babcock Drive). We’ll take the free # 80 campus bus together between tours.

Special Occasions and Everyday Fare: Menus and More in the Wisconsin Historical Society

Menus reflect social history, as well as dietary trends and design sensibilities from the mid-1800s to the present day. Come see examples of menus in the collection, learn about archival collections in the Organic and Sustainable Agriculture Collection, and find out about other food-related materials at the WHS.

From Soup to Nuts: Exploring the Steenbock Library Cookbook Collection

Cookbooks show our our changing household management practices, our ingredients, our tools, and our customs for entertaining, presenting and serving a meal. Tour Steenbock’s remarkable holdings in cookbooks related to culinary history, world and US regional cuisines, food fads and trends, and appliance and product cookbooks.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Leslie Lockett Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

The Culture of Cheese in Medieval England

Leslie Lockett
Department of English, Ohio State University

Friday, February 24, 2017 @ 4:00pm Department of Art History, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Room L150

In the early Middle Ages, cheesemaking was a household chore, and virtually everyone knew how to do it, but cheesemakers worked without knowledge of the chemical processes that separate milk into cheese curds and whey, and they had far less ability to manage the microscopic organisms that inhabit all cheeses and determine whether a cheese will turn out delicious, spoiled, or somewhere in between. Professor Lockett will explore the knowledge and practice of cheesemaking in early medieval England, considering how the invisible and inexplicable parts of the curdling process shaped cultural perceptions of cheese. She will also discuss how environmental changes may have impeded the ability of Anglo-Saxon cheesemakers to produce hard cheeses that were as delicious as they were durable. Prof. Lockett is author of Anglo-Saxon Psychologies in the Vernacular and Latin Traditions (Toronto, 2011), which was awarded the Sir Israel Gollancz Prize by the British Academy in 2013 and the John Nicholas Brown Prize for Best First Book by the Medieval Academy of America in 2015. She is producing a new edition, translation, and comprehensive study of the Old English Soliloquies. 

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Leslie Lockett Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Workshop

Leslie Lockett
Department of English, Ohio State University

Friday, February 24, 2017
12:00pm - 1:15pm
Department of Art History, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Hagen Room, Room 150

Workshop with Prof. Leslie Lockett (Department of English, Ohio State University) on "Anglo-Saxon Psychologies through the Lens of the Old English Soliloquies" based on her book, Anglo-Saxon Psychologies in the Vernacular and Latin Traditions (Toronto and London: University of Toronto Press, 2011).

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Ayako Kato Terra Incognita Art Series

What is Movement? Workshop

Ayako Kato
Dancer and Choreographer

Friday, February 17, 2017
12:00pm - 1:30pm
Village Community Cohousing

To register for this workshop email: terra.incognita.art@gmail.com

Ayako Kato’s What is Movement? is a dance-based inquiry into movement and stillness. As a movement artist who is influenced by an Eastern and Japanese view of nature and the philosophy of Tao, Kato’s ongoing practice is to perceive humans as a part of nature and to represent human movement as the embodiment of ‘The Way’ of nature. What is Movement? proposes a perpetual question and exhibits the states of unity and eternity residing in our ephemeral being. Tuning into principles inside and outside the body, Kato’s focus is not to create new steps or movement sequences, but to realize and represent the principles of nature and the body. Her work advocates for the human sensibilities of ‘stillness’ and ‘silence’, fostering perception of that which emerges between the body and the environment through the interplay of dynamics.

This movement-based workshop inspired by Kato’s practice and the ideas of What is Movement? will begin with anatomical/somatic warm up exercises and deep breathing, followed by observing natural and various types of objects, and analyzing those objects as well as relationships between/among them. Open to all people, including those with no experience of dance ranging to those who have professional level expertise. This workshop is for anyone interested in movement and our relationship to nature/environment. 

To register for this workshop email: terra.incognita.art@gmail.com

Please join to watch the performance of Ayako’s blue fish on February 16th.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Center for Culture, History and Environment, Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; The Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Arts and Literature Laboratory; Madison Public Library; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office.

This workshop is free and open to the public.

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Ayako Kato Terra Incognita Art Series

blue fish

Ayako Kato
Dancer and Choreographer

Thursday, February 16, 2017 @ 7:30pm Arts & Literature Laboratory, 2021 Winnebago St.

blue fish explores Ayako’s relationship to the production of, and destruction from, nuclear energy in both Japan and the U.S. This dance performance will be followed by a brief panel discussing movement as a means of transformation and eastern views of nature. Ayako’s goal is to enhance the contemporary audience’s sensibility of “the beauty of being as it is,” inspired by the traditional Japanese aesthetic of “furyu (風流),” literally wind flow. She is a dance artist influenced by a Japanese view of nature and the philosophy of Tao. Her ongoing practice is to rediscover humans as a part of nature and to represent human movement as the embodiment of “The Way” of nature. Nature encompasses the common elements of nature, including plants, flowers, animals, insects, birds, fish, ocean, rivers, mountains, water etc. But in Japanese, nature also means “being as it is.” For humans, this doesn’t mean doing as we please. To “be as it is,” we are constantly responsible for our own transformative state of being, in search of who we are, evolving together with others, following principles of nature in its cyclical thoroughness. There, the human mind is a seed source to create powerful phenomena. Any tiny movement can yield a moment of enormous impact. Our small actions can spark small social change—that can eventually lead to major and impactful social change. Ayako’s dance elevates the audience’s sensitivity in order to recognize the glowing, ephemeral beauty of being and gravity in themselves and others. It encourages perception of the intangible, or furyu. It affirms and nurtures the dignity of life.

Following the performance, there will be a brief panel featuring professors Jan Miyasaki, Peggy Choy, and Sulfikar Amir on eastern views of nature, nuclear energy, and movement as a means of transformation.

Ayako Kato is an award winning Chicago-based dancer, choreographer, improviser, teacher, and curator, originally from Yokohama, Japan. Since 1998, she has been an artistic director of Ayako Kato/Art Union Humanscape (AUH) and has presented and performed her works extensively in the United States, Japan, and Europe. She has been studying dance anatomy under Irene Dowd since 2007. In addition to classical ballet and modern dance, she also studied Tai Chi, Noh Theater, and Butoh with master Kazuo Ohno, one of the founders. She holds MFA in Dance from the University of Michigan and a certificate from the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance of Wesleyan University.

Ayako will also be leading a movement-based workshop February 17th.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Center for Culture, History and Environment, Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; The Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Arts and Literature Laboratory; Madison Public Library; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office.

This event is open to the public. 

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Devon Powers Sound Studies

Seminar with SoundStudies@UW

Devon Powers
Associate Professor of Advertising, Temple University

Friday, February 10, 2017
10:00am - 11:30am
University Club 212

Powers will host a seminar focusing on her work on popular music critics, and the process of sound and music criticism more generally. She will also speak to the ways in which the line between academic and popular criticism blurs, and a recent special issue of Popular Music she co-edited called "The Critical Imperative” which called for writing about popular music that placed primacy on sounds as made and heard, and which was styled in a way that foregrounds not just academic rigor, but also imaginative description, creative interpretation and daring evaluation. While criticism is increasingly marginalized in the mainstream media, many writers and readers have constructed new spaces for musical reflection online and this discourse, as sophisticated as it is public, represents a challenge to academic work on pop ensconced behind university paywalls. 

Devon Powers is Associate Professor of Advertising, Temple University. She is the author of Writing the Record: The Village Voice and the Birth of Rock Criticism (University of Massachusetts Press, 2013), and co-editor of Blowing Up the Brand: Critical Perspectives on Promotional Culture (Peter Lang, 2010). Her research explores historical and contemporary consumer culture, including popular music, sound and advertising, and music criticism. Recent work has appeared in Journal of Consumer Culture, New Media & Society, and Popular Communication; she is currently at work on a book about trends.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Devon Powers Sound Studies

Trends, Inc. (Public Lecture)

Devon Powers
Associate Professor of Advertising, Temple University

Thursday, February 9, 2017
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Vilas 3155 (enter Vilas from the Park and University ramp and walk past the elevators into the Instructional Media Center)

Powers will be giving a talk on some of her newer research on trends and the way they mediate cultural change so that it may be anticipated, managed, and manufactured. By critically examining the history and current practice of trend forecasting—a hidden but influential industry that trades in cultural prediction and that affects music, fashion, and a number of other cultural industries, she will explore how trends evolved into powerful force in global consumer culture and a currency via which the future of culture is bought and sold.

Devon Powers is Associate Professor of Advertising, Temple University. She is the author of Writing the Record: The Village Voice and the Birth of Rock Criticism (University of Massachusetts Press, 2013), and co-editor of Blowing Up the Brand: Critical Perspectives on Promotional Culture (Peter Lang, 2010). Her research explores historical and contemporary consumer culture, including popular music, sound and advertising, and music criticism. Recent work has appeared in Journal of Consumer Culture, New Media & Society, and Popular Communication; she is currently at work on a book about trends.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Neil Verma Sound Studies

Seminar with SoundStudies@UW

Neil Verma
Assistant Professor of Sound Studies, Northwestern University

Friday, January 27, 2017
10:00am - 11:30am
University Club 212

Neil will discuss the new sound studies program at Northwestern, how it came to be and how Northwestern has thought about “institutionalizing” Sound Studies. He’ll also be discussing the new network he his helping to build - GLASS (Great Lakes Association for Sound Studies).

Neil Verma is assistant professor of sound studies in Radio/Television/Film at Northwestern University. Verma is author of Theater of the Mind: Imagination, Aesthetics, and American Radio Drama (Chicago, 2012), which won the 2013 Best First Book Award from the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. Verma has published articles and chapters on topics ranging from film history and television sound design to experimental listening and podcasting. Verma is working on two books, tentatively titled “How Sounds Think: Making Strange Radio in the Podcasting Age” and “Hiding in Plain Sound: The Radio Drama of Orson Welles.” He is Network Director for the Radio Preservation Task Force at the Library of Congress and co-founder of the Great Lakes Association for Sound Studies (GLASS). 

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Neil Verma Sound Studies

Radio Wrong Side Out: Anatomy and Geology of the Scream

Neil Verma
Assistant Professor of Sound Studies, Northwestern University

Thursday, January 26, 2017
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Vilas 4070

Taking as its starting point the work of sound artist Gregory Whitehead in his landmark Pressures of the Unspeakable (1991), this paper offers two new approaches to the problem of the mediated scream, long viewed as an entity “at the edge” of things – modernity, language, theory. Drawing on virtuosic radio screams ranging from the work of Antonin Artaud to Arch Oboler and Wyllis Cooper, Verma argues that the radio scream represents a voice possessed by its own materiality, becoming not merely a limit case in the expressive arts, but also what Whitehead calls a "way in" to “anatomical” theories of the voice and “geological” theories of media history. 

Neil Verma is assistant professor of sound studies in Radio/Television/Film at Northwestern University. Verma is author of Theater of the Mind: Imagination, Aesthetics, and American Radio Drama (Chicago, 2012), which won the 2013 Best First Book Award from the Society for Cinema and Media Studies. Verma has published articles and chapters on topics ranging from film history and television sound design to experimental listening and podcasting. Verma is working on two books, tentatively titled “How Sounds Think: Making Strange Radio in the Podcasting Age” and “Hiding in Plain Sound: The Radio Drama of Orson Welles.” He is Network Director for the Radio Preservation Task Force at the Library of Congress and co-founder of the Great Lakes Association for Sound Studies (GLASS). 

Veronica Berns Applied Comics Kitchen!

A Distillation of Method in Picture Form

Veronica Berns
Postdoctoral Fellow, Northwestern University

Thursday, November 17, 2016
4:00pm - 6:30pm
6131 Humanities Building

Dr. Berns is an expert in materials chemistry. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where she researched solid-state chemistry under Professor Danny Fredrickson. She worked in industry for two years and is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University. Dr. Berns makes comics to connect non-scientists to her research and current topics in chemistry. She created a comic book version of her dissertation called,Atomic Size Matters. Last year, Dr. Berns created a kickstart campaign, which garnered over $14,000, to publish her comic book.

In her generative workshop, participants will translate research into a graphic narrative by producing a script and then converting that script into a comic.

This workshop is open to researchers in all academic fields. Registration is required.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Applied Comics Kitchen!

Stella Brown Terra Incognita Art Series

Make Your Own Rock Shop of Wonders

Stella Brown
Artist and Curator

Saturday, November 12, 2016
10:00am - 12:00pm
Madison Central Public Library, 201 Mifflin St. (Bubbler Room)

Workshop for rock enthusiasts of all ages. Come explore the world of Anthropocene rocks and learn to make your own collection to treasure or display! Visiting artist and curator Stella Brown will be leading people to create their own displays and learn more about humans and the environment.

Stella Brown is a Chicago-based artist. Brown’s museum-style collection methodologies represent events, ideas, or places, often drawn from artistic, anthropological, historic, and scientific objects. Stella Brown holds a BA in Collection and Display of the Cultural Object from NYU’s Gallatin.

Also join us for the unveiling of Stella’s installation in Science Hall on November 11th.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Center for Culture, History and Environment, Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; The Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Arts and Literature Laboratory; Madison Public Library; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office.

This event is free and open to the public. 

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Stella Brown Terra Incognita Art Series

Rock Shop of the Anthropocene

Stella Brown
Artist and Curator

Friday, November 11, 2016 @ 5:00pm Science Hall, 550 N Park St. (front entry)

Rock Shop of the Anthropocene is a recommissioned exhibition displayed previously at The Comfort Station in Chicago. This piece will be shown in Science Hall from November 11th- December 20th. This exhibit explores the geologic detritus of the Anthropocene; a space to explore collection, commodification, and the contemporary geologic condition.

Please join us for the unveiling of this work, a brief artist talk, and snacks and refreshments.

Stella Brown holds a BA in Collection and Display of the Cultural Object from NYU’s Gallatin. Research is a main component of her practice. Brown’s museum-style collection methodologies represent events, ideas, or places, often drawn from artistic, anthropological, historic, and scientific objects.

Stella will also be leading a workshop Saturday November 12th at Madison Public Library.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Center for Culture, History and Environment, Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; The Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Arts and Literature Laboratory; Madison Public Library; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office.

This event is free and open to the public. 

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Various Food Studies Network

Faculty Research Forum

Various

Friday, November 11, 2016
9:00am - 12:00pm
Orchard View Room, Discovery Building, 330 N Orchard St.

An interdisciplinary program showcasing artists, humanists, scientists, and social scientists who study food across the UW-Madison campus.

PRESENTERS:

Alfonso Morales (Urban and Regional Planning), Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney (Anthropology), Grazia Menechella (French and Italian), Janet Gilmore (Landscape Architecture), Jennifer Gaddis (Human Ecology), Jordan D. Rosenblum (Religious Studies), Lydia Zepeda (Consumer Science), Meg Mitchell (Art), Stephen Ventura (Soil Science)

DISCUSSANTS:

Jane Collins (Community and Environmental Sociology), Linda Hogle (Medical History and Bioethics), Michael Peterson (Art)

MODERATOR:

Laurie Beth Clark (Art)

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Jerome Camal Sound Studies

Sound Studies 2016-17 Kick Off

Jerome Camal
Anthropology, UW-Madison

Tuesday, November 8, 2016
3:30pm - 4:30pm
313 University Club Building

The SoundStudies@UW workshop will host its kick-off event with a research presentation by Jerome Camal. An Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dr. Camal will be sharing some of his most recent research on “sonic tourism” in the Caribbean. An ethnomusicologist and jazz musician, Camal is also part of developing global music studies initiatives on campus. After the talk and a question/discussion period, we will head to a nearby location for socializing/beverages/networking, so please be sure to join us!

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Persis Berlekamp Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Medieval Islamic Art between Cosmic Frame and Human Agency

Persis Berlekamp
Associate Professor of Art History, University of Chicago

Friday, November 4, 2016 @ 4:00pm Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, L150

Public Lecture.

Persis Berlekamp (Ph.D. Harvard University) works on Islamic art and architecture, with research specialization in Arabic and Persian manuscripts of the late Abbasid and Mongol periods (thirteenth to fifteenth centuries). Belekamp's current research interests include Neoplatonic cosmography and the imaging of natural history, alchemy, and astrology; the application of medieval Islamic traditions of medical illustration to Chinese medicine; and how theoretical understandings of talismans relate to their visual forms.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Persis Berlekamp Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Workshop

Persis Berlekamp
Associate Professor of Art History, University of Chicago

Friday, November 4, 2016 @ 12:00pm The Hagen Room, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building

A workshop on medieval Islamic cosomological imagery with Persis Berlekamp (Associate Professor of Art History, University of Chicago), related to her book, Wonder, Image, and Cosmos in Medieval Islam (London and New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011).

The Hagen Room is the Art History Conference Room, to left of north entrance, U Club side.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Paul Ortiz Sound Studies

A New Origin Narrative: African American and Latina/o Histories in an Age of Neoliberal Crisis

Paul Ortiz
Oral Historian, University of Florida

Tuesday, November 1, 2016 @ 3:11pm Varies

From Nov. 15-17, SoundStudies@UW is pleased to co-sponsor with The Havens Center for Social Justice the visit of oral historian Paul Ortiz. Ortiz is Associate Professor of History and the Director of the award-winning Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida. His publications include Emancipation Betrayed, a history of the Black Freedom struggle in Florida, and the co-edited volume, Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Tell About Life in the Jim Crow South, which recently went into its 4th printing. His forthcoming monograph is titled: Our Separate Struggles Are Really One: African American and Latino Histories. He is also co-author (with William H. Chafe) of the forthcoming book, Behind the Veil: African Americans in the Age of Segregation, 1895-1965.

Here are the details for the 3 events he will be putting on during his visit:

Lecture: "The Mexican War of Independence and US History: Tearing Down American Exceptionalism and Moving Forward in the 21st Century"
Tuesday, November 15, 4pm, 3401 Sterling Hall

Lecture: “'Killed Helping Workers to Organize': African American and Latina/o Narratives in the Century of Jim Crow/Juan Crow"
Wednesday, November 16, 4pm, 3401 Sterling Hall

Seminar: Open Seminar for Students, Faculty and Public
Thursday, November 17, 12:20pm, 8108 Social Science

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Helen J. Bullard Terra Incognita Art Series

Borrowing Limulus: the multi-kingdom ingredient

Helen J. Bullard
Research-based Storyteller

Friday, October 28, 2016 @ 5:00pm 110 Science Hall

Borrowing Limulus is a storytelling event featuring Helen Bullard's work with the horseshoe crab. Q&A to follow with Professor Laurie Beth Clark. Often taking a poetry/prose hybrid form, Helen’s storytelling also includes performance, video work, sculpture, and photography. Her current research is focused around the horseshoe crab; their evolution and natural history, ecology, conservation, and use in medicine.

Borrowing, using, watching. These are just three of the portholes I could have beckoned you through. Into the water, into deep time, through laboratory doors. Into the verve of the horseshoe crab (Limulus), the “living fossils,” the “blue-bloods,” and into my world. For the Terra Incognita Art Series, I will offer a cluster of multi-kingdom limulid-story inroads.

Helen J. Bullard's work and research covers a wide range of animal subjects, cultures and (un)natural histories. Her most current and ongoing interests are towards aquatic creatures: whales, eels, jellyfish, and most especially the horseshoe crab. Her fascination with the horseshoe crab (and most specifically their relationship with humans through biomedical use, arachnid aversion, environmental concerns and value systems) is also part of doctoral research at University Wisconsin-Madison, towards a Special Committee Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Arts and Science, anchored through the 4D Arts Department.

Laurie Beth Clark is a Professor of Non-Static Forms in the Art Department of the University of Wisconsin where, since 1985, she has taught studio classes in Video, Performance, and Installations, as well as Special Topics like Collaboration and Relational Aesthetics and more than twenty different academic seminars in Visual Culture Studies.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Center for Culture, History and Environment, Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; The Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Arts and Literature Laboratory; Madison Public Library; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office.

This event is free and open to the public. 

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Nick Sousanis Applied Comics Kitchen!

Unflattening

Nick Sousanis
Assistant Professor of Humanities and Liberal Studies, San Francisco State University

Thursday, October 20, 2016
4:00pm - 6:30pm
6131 Humanities Building

Dr. Sousanis is a cartoonist and education scholar. He is an assistant professor at San Francisco State University in the departments of Humanities and Liberal Studies. In 2015, Harvard Univeristy Press published his graphic dissertation titled, Unflattening, as a comic book. Unflattening is the winner of the 2016 American Publishers Awards for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (PROSE Award) in Humanities and the Lynd Ward Prize for best Graphic Novel of 2015. Unflattening was also nominated for a 2016 Eisner Award for Best Scholarly/Academic work.

Dr. Sousanis has given invited public talks about comics making in teaching and research at Stanford University, UCLA, and Microsoft Research.His recent comics include “Against the Flow” and “Upwards” in The Boston Globe, and “The Fragile Framework,” co-authored with Rich Monastersky for Nature. 

Nick Sousanis will facilitate a generative workshop about thinking through drawing and cartooning. Participants will do drawing and cartooning activities that can be adapted in their scholarship and teaching practices. This workshop is open to faculty, students, and researchers in all academic fields.

Registration is required.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Applied Comics Kitchen!

Jonathan Guyer Applied Comics Kitchen!

Graphic Journalism

Jonathan Guyer
Fellow, Institute of Current World Affairs; Contributing Editor of the Cairo Review of Global Affairs

Thursday, October 13, 2016
4:00pm - 6:30pm
6131 Humanities Building

Jonathan Guyer is a journalist and critical scholar based in Cairo, Egypt. He is an expert in Middle Eastern cartoons and political comics. He has written for magazines and news outlets such as Harpers, New York Magazine, Salon, The New Yorker, and the Paris Review.

He will facilitate a generative workshop about taboos and censorship in graphic journalism. Participants will do drawing and cartooning activities that can be adapted in their work and teaching practices. This workshop is open to faculty and students in all academic fields.

Registration is required.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Applied Comics Kitchen!

Antonio José Ponte Food Studies Network

Jama y carcomilla: gastronomía y revolución en Cuba

Antonio José Ponte
Poet and Essayist

Monday, October 10, 2016
5:00pm - 7:00pm
313 University Club Building

The Borghesi-Mellon Food Studies Workshop is co-sponsoring this talk about gastronomy and the revolution in Cuba by poet and essayist Antonio José Ponte. This talk will be in Spanish.

Un repaso a varias décadas de racionamiento estatal de alimentos y de imaginación popular para combatir el racionamiento. Una mirada a libros de recetas, programas televisivos, literatura y cine: el comer como obsesión de una época que no termina aún.

Antonio José Ponte (Cuba, 1964) Poeta, ensayista y narrador. Ha publicado, entre otros títulos, Las comidas profundas (Deleatur, Angers, 1997), Asiento en las ruinas (Renacimiento, Sevilla, 2005), In the cold of the Malecón & other stories (City Lights Books, San Francisco, 2000), Cuentos de todas partes del Imperio (Deleatur, Angers, 2000), Un seguidor de Montaigne mira La Habana/Las comidas profundas (Verbum, Madrid, 2001),El libro perdido de los origenistas (Renacimiento, Sevilla, 2004), Un arte de hacer ruinas y otros cuentos (Fondo de Cultura Económica, México D.F., 2005), La fiesta vigilada (Anagrama, Barcelona, 2007) y Villa Marista en plata. Artes, política, nuevas tecnologías (Colibrí, Madrid, 2010). Reside en Madrid, donde vicedirige el diario digital Diario de Cuba.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Rob Lundberg Terra Incognita Art Series

Bearings

Rob Lundberg
Visual Artist/Musician

Friday, October 7, 2016
7:00pm - 11:00pm
Madison Central Public Library, 2nd Floor, 201 W. Mifflin St.

Bearings is a conceptual documentary photography project exploring connection, comfort, and sense of place in wild places. These photographs explore the interactions between the built roadway and natural surroundings. The series will be displayed on the 2nd floor of Madison Public Library October and November 2016. Please join us for the opening reception, as part of Gallery Night, which will also feature a string sextet playing original music composed by Lundberg.

Rob makes music, takes photos, builds things, thinks about and drinks water. He has performed a wide range of music throughout the US, Canada, and Europe. His photography is currently focused on the interaction of “wild” and human-built spaces. He earned his BFA from The New School in Jazz Performance and is pursuing a JD and MS from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Law and Environmental Studies. Additionally, he is a graduate associate of the Center for Culture, History, and Environment.

Additional funding, co-sponsorship, and support from: Wisconsin Union Directorate Society & Politics; Center for Culture, History and Environment, Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies; The Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies; Arts and Literature Laboratory; Madison Public Library; Wisconsin State Cartographers Office.

This event is free and open to the public.

About the Terra Incognita Art Series Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Sarah Khan Food Studies Network

Peddlers, Police, & Power 1906 vs 2016: Queens Migrant Kitchen Series

Sarah Khan
Artist and Journalist

Friday, September 30, 2016 @ 10:00am 313 University Club Building

Come watch a series of short films that are part of The Queens Migrant Kitchen Series developed by Sarah K. Khan and Culinary Backstreets. You will take the Number 7 overground train across the largest borough, learn about the theatre director turned arepa street vendor, watch street vendors fight for their rights, past and present, and see how African-Americans survived travel in the Jim Crow era. You’ll also learn about the next multimedia projects Khan is developing for the most diverse city in the world, where over 135 languages are spoken.

As a multimedia journalist/artist, Sarah K. Khan focuses on the migration of people (mainly women) and food. She makes visible, often, their invisible lives via photography, cartography, film, and writing. She partners with like-minded organizations and individuals to utilize food to provoke thought about food sovereignty. Women tend to be the carriers of vital cultural knowledge, such as foodways and healing. Food, as a metaphor for culture, is not only about shared connections to family and community, but also about universal multisensory experiences of cultural survival. She left academia to devote herself to a trans-media art practice, to produce work across disciplines, and to reach larger audiences.

The Queens Migrant Kitchen Project merges Sarah’s artistic training and life’s work in public health (MPH), nutrition (MS), traditional food, and healing systems (PhD). While on a Fulbright in India last year, she created a multimedia series on Old Delhi Foodways for Culinary Backstreets. She recently completed the first film on Indian women farmers using documentary techniques, song, graphics, animation, and data-driven maps. The first film in the series, Bowing To No One, about an indigenous Indian woman farmer, was officially selected for the New York Film Week 2016. The Queens Migrant Kitchen Project combines food journalism and documentary filmmaking to amplify the voices of migrants’ contributions to New York culture and beyond.

Khan recently received an Asian Women’s Giving Circle Grant to expand the Queens Migrant Kitchen Series, and has been shortlisted for an Asian American Writers Workshop Fellowship to expand the Queens Stories.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Susan Squier Applied Comics Kitchen!

Picture This: A Graphic Medicine Workshop

Susan Squier

Tuesday, September 27, 2016
11:00am - 1:30pm
6131 Humanities Building

This ACK! September workshop for med and nursing students with Susan Squier and Lynda Barry is currently full.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Applied Comics Kitchen!

Elly Truitt Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Fantastic Inventions: Mechanical Marvels in Medieval Histories of Troy

Elly Truitt
Associate Professor of History, Bryn Mawr College

Friday, September 23, 2016 @ 3:00pm L150 Conrad A. Elvehjem Building

Elly Truitt teaches medieval history, including courses on medieval medicine, the history of magic, intellectual history, the crusades, global networks in the Middle Ages, and courtly culture at Bryn Mawr College. Her research interests are in the history of science, medicine, and technology. She has published articles on the history of astronomy, pharmacobotany, timekeeping technologies, and the history of automata. She is the author of Medieval Robots: Mechanism, Magic, Nature, and Art (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015). She is currently working on several projects, including an article on translation in Chaucer's Treatise on the Astrolabe, a new translation of a work by Roger Bacon, and a book about Roger Bacon's speculative technology.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Elly Truitt Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages

Workshop & Discussion

Elly Truitt
Associate Professor of History, Bryn Mawr College

Friday, September 23, 2016
12:00pm - 1:15pm
The Hagen Room, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building

A workshop discussion with Prof. Truitt on her recent book, Medieval Robots: Mechanism, Magic, Nature , and Art (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2015). Open to advanced undergraduates, graduates students and faculty. Interested participants should register for the event through Medieval Studies (tedale@wisc.edu).

Directions to the Hagen Room, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building: enter at left from the north door, U Club Side.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Science, Nature, and Wonder in the Middle Ages.

Food Studies Network Food Studies Network

Organizational Meeting

Food Studies Network

Friday, September 9, 2016
11:00am - 12:00pm
212 University Club Building

The Food Studies Network will bring together faculty, staff and graduate students whose research and teaching involves food. We’ll look at food gastronomically and phenomenologically. We’ll consider “the ways that individuals, communities, and societies relate to and represent food.” Emphasizing the culture in agriculture, we’ll look at the sourcing of food and its delivery, particularly on the local level, by looking at farming and cooking. We’ll think about aesthetics and ethics, marketing and technology, hunger and excess, anorexia and obesity, cooking and eating, justice and regulation, nutrition and safety. Over the course of the year, our activities will include sharing research, discussion of readings, guest speakers, and meals. We will host thematically organized presentations of faculty and graduate student research, meet with local chefs and with local food producers, and maybe host a popular food writer.  

Following the organizational meeting, at 12 PM, we will host a lunch time discussion (yes there will be food) with the visiting artists Ariadna Rodriguez and Inaki Alvarez of the Barcelona-based collective Nyamnyam.

Please contact Laurie Beth Clark (lbclark@wisc.edu) if you would like to join for the organizational meeting and/or the lunch. These are not linked events. You can come to one, the other, or both.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Ariadna Rodriguez and Iñaki Alvarez Food Studies Network

Nyamnyam Residency 2016

Ariadna Rodriguez and Iñaki Alvarez

Monday, August 29 through Friday, September 23 Varies

The Barcelona-based arts collective Nyamnyam (Ariadna Rodriguez and Iñaki Alvarez) will be in residence in Madison from 29 August to 23 September.

Nyamnyam aims to promote creativity, knowledge exchange and culture by creating and sharing strategies to generate dialogue. We use artistic tools to design collective actions that create horizontal relationships that place everybody on the same level of action. We create a link between diverse forms of art, using food as a vehicle to create situations that invigorate relations and social contact between people. We aim to learn new ways to create synergies that can reactivate or rethink our ways of living, creating and eating.

Scheduled public events:

  • Thursday, 8 September, 2 PM – 6 PM, Open Studio at the Bubbler, Madison Public Library, 201 W. Mifflin
  • Friday, 9 September, 12 PM, Lunch with Food Studies Network, 212 University Club Building, 432 East Campus Mall. **To sign up contact lbclark@wisc.edu.
  • Thursday, 15 September, 2 PM – 6 PM, Open Studio at the Bubbler, Madison Public Library, 201 W. Mifflin
  • Saturday, 17 September, 1 PM, Public Presentation at the Bubbler, Madison Public Library, 201 W. Mifflin
  • Wednesday, 21 September, 4:30 PM, Art Department Visiting Artist Series Public Lecture, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Room L160

The artists are available to for studio visits with graduate students by appointment throughout this period and are also interested to meet local artists as time allows. Please contact espai@nyamnyam.net to schedule a meeting. Nyamnyam’s website is mostly in Catalan, but rich with images: http://www.nyamnyam.net/. More about Nyamnyam's work and projects-in-process can be found (in English) here.

This residency is supported with funds from Art Department, Center for Humanities Mellon Borghesi Workshop, Spatula&Barcode, and University Lectures. Co-sponsors: Art + Scholarship in Theory & Practice, Art History, Center for Visual Cultures, Design Studies, Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies, Spanish & Portuguese. Projects being developed in collaboration with Madison Public Library and MMoCA.

About the Food Studies Network Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

DHRN Digital Humanities Research Network

DHRN Year-End Party

DHRN

Tuesday, May 10, 2016
4:30pm - 6:00pm
Smitty's Study Pub, Fluno Center, 601 University Avenue

The Digital Humanities Research Network invites everyone who has been a part of our group in any capacity this year to join us for a year-end celebration! We will meet in the Fluno Center's Study Pub on Tuesday, May 10 at 4:30 p.m. for a fun, informal gathering. Bring your memories of our past two years as a Borghesi-Mellon Workshop through the Center for the Humanities, and your ideas for our future as a project of the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture. 

DHRN is a part of the Borghesi-Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with support from Nancy and David Borghesi and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

A Symposium Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

IN MEDIAS RES: THE LOCAL AND THE GLOBAL IN THE MIDDLE AGES

A Symposium

Friday, May 6, 2016 @ 11:00am 6191 Helen C. White Hall

The Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages invites you to our LAST EVENT, an all-day symposium, free and open to the public, on our theme over the last two years. The roster includes faculty and graduate student speakers and an exciting keynote by a visiting scholar, who will also hold a workshop the day before the symposium. Check out the schedule below for details and please contact Lisa Cooper (lhcooper@wisc.edu) with any questions.

11:00am – 12:15pm        Session 1

Thomas Dale, Art History, UW-Madison

"Covered in Cloth of Gold”: Richard II, The Three Kings, and Textiles from the Orient in the Wilton Diptych

Andrew Thomas, English, UW-Madison

Performing Pilgrims and the Usefulness of the Holy Land in the Age of Verbal Reproduction

Samuel England, African Languages and Literature, UW-Madison

From Fustat to Flint: Spectacle and Public Agony in Classical Arabic Performance

12:15p – 1:45p Lunch Break

 

1:45pm – 3:00pm         Session 2

Michael Shank, History of Science, UW-Madison

Rethinking Early Medieval Science Locally and Globally

Mari Lewis, English, UW-Madison

Constructing Worldviews and Imagined Religious Collectives: Immersive Reading & Virtual Realities in Fulcher of Chartres’s A History of the Expedition to Jerusalem

Leonora Neville, History, UW-Madison

Breaking All the Rules: A Byzantine Princess Writes History

3:00pm – 4:00pm Break

 

4:00pm        Plenary Lecture
The First Lost Cause: Biblical Commentary, Monastic Engagement with the World, and the Local Read Globally in 10th- & 11th- c. Europe

Matthew Gabriele, Religion and Culture, Virginia Tech

This talk will consider five monastic authors from the century surrounding the turn of the first millennium. All five all wrote while living in the shadow of the Franks' former glory, seeing around them the decline of the new kingdom of Israel, a period of political instability caused by moral decline and a turning away from God. The tenth-century authors looked to the past for guidance, while those in the eleventh century saw their contemporary moments as contingent, pregnant with possibility. If we are conscious of the tenth and eleventh century's "horizons of expectation," we become aware of how those horizons shaped the meaning that people of the time attached to events in the world around them. All of these authors read their local politics and society into a global frame, into the arc of sacred history. The Bible, the history of the Chosen People, read through the filter of ninth-century commentaries that survived primarily in tenth- and eleventh-century manuscripts, began to make authors consider their own role in God’s plan. With the Frankish empire gone, the new Israel suffering another captivity, the historical moment became contingent, unstable. Events repeated, the cycle of sacred history continued, but it was now possible that those events' ultimate significance could change, that the monastic author's contemporary moment actually occupied another place on the timeline. It was up to them to change things and move the timeline forward. This time, maybe this time, things would be different.

Professor Gabriele will also hold a workshop on Thursday, May 5th at 3:30 on the 3rd floor of the Humanities Building in the History Department Conference Room. The reading for the workshop is Professor Gabriele’s recent article in the Journal of Medieval History, "From Prophecy to Apocalypse: The Verb Tenses of Jerusalem in Robert the Monk's Historia of the First Crusade." Please contact Lisa Cooper at lhcooper@wisc.edu or Karl Shoemaker at kbshoemaker@wisc.edu for the passoword to the reading.

Ben Aslinger Sound Studies

Workshop: Located Sounds: The Place of Sound in Research

Ben Aslinger
Assistant Professor of Media and Culture, Bentley University

Friday, April 29, 2016
10:00am - 12:00pm
University Club 313

In this workshop, Dr. Aslinger will discuss a few of his current research projects, with a special emphasis on sound and place, and sound and subjectivity. Looking at some of his research on the popular music industries, and on video game and television sound, the workshop will deal with the question: "How do sounds get fixed to place and identities, and how do we deal with sonic travels and sonic particularities?" The workshop is also meant for participants to share some of their own current research projects, and to reflect on the role of sound both as a research object and as a methodological tool. 

Ben Aslinger is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Media Studies at Bentley University. He is the coeditor (with Nina Huntemann) ofGaming Globally: Production, Play, and Place (Palgrave 2013) and coeditor (with Germaine R. Halegoua) of Locating Emerging Media (Routledge 2016). His work has appeared in journals such as Cinema JournalMedia, Culture & SocietyThe Velvet Light Trap, and Popular Communication, and anthologies such as theRoutledge Companion to Media and Gender,  A Companion to New Media DynamicsLGBT Identity and Online New MediaHow to Watch Television, and Queer Love in Film and Television

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Deborah Bräutigam Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Will Africa Feed China?

Deborah Bräutigam
Director of International Development Program and China-Africa Research Initiative, School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University

Thursday, April 28, 2016
6:00pm - 7:30pm
The Law School, Room 5246

Is China building a new empire in rural Africa? Few development topics are as controversial and emotionally charged as the belief that the Chinese government is aggressively buying up huge tracts of prime African land to grow food to ship back to China. Prof. Deborah Bräutigam, one of the world’s leading experts on China and Africa, probes the myths and realities behind the media headlines. Chinese farming investments are in fact surprisingly limited, and land acquisitions modest. Defying expectations, China actually exports more food to Africa than it imports. Why is the reality of Chinese investment so different from the headlines? Is this picture likely to change? What role will China play as rural Africa moves from subsistence to commercial agriculture, and China builds a portfolio of tools to allow its agribusiness firms to “go global”? In this talk, she will answer these questions as it sheds new light on China’s evolving global quest for food security and Africa’s possibilities for structural transformation.

Deborah Bräutigam is the Bernard L. Schwartz Professor of Political Economy, Director of the International Development Program, and Director of the China-Africa Research Initiative at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Her most recent books are The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa (2010) and Will Africa Feed China? (2015). Before joining SAIS in 2012, she taught at Columbia University and American University. Bräutigam’s teaching and research focus on international development strategies, governance, and foreign aid.

Presented in partnership with the Land Tenure Center, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, and Alexandra Hamilton Society.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Ben Aslinger Sound Studies

Not Simply Sweet Nothings: Sound Technologies, Queerness, and Intimacy

Ben Aslinger
Assistant Professor of Media and Culture, Bentley University

Thursday, April 28, 2016
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Vilas 4028

The paper investigates connections between queer talk, audio and communication technologies, and intimacy in queer representations. It draws on research in sound studies and the affective turn as well as ongoing conversations about publicness and privateness in sound and digital media in order to analyze how the use of audio technologies in queer film indicates the attempt by directors to develop new ways of representing queer intimacy. 

Ben Aslinger is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Media Studies at Bentley University. He is the coeditor (with Nina Huntemann) of Gaming Globally: Production, Play, and Place (Palgrave 2013) and coeditor (with Germaine R. Halegoua) of Locating Emerging Media (Routledge 2016). His work has appeared in journals such as Cinema Journal, Media, Culture & Society, The Velvet Light Trap, and Popular Communication, and anthologies such as the Routledge Companion to Media and Gender,  A Companion to New Media Dynamics, LGBT Identity and Online New Media, How to Watch Television, and Queer Love in Film and Television

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

DHRN Digital Humanities Research Network

DHRN

Tuesday, April 26, 2016
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

This meeting will be a discussion reflecting on Laura Mandell's 4/15 lecture on "Gender and Big Data," putting it into conversation with some of her published work. We hope this discussion will offer a way to open up onto larger questions about the state of digital humanities work today and to wrap up some of the conversations we've been having all year about digitization, archives, and sustainability. All are welcome, whether or not you attended Mandell's lecture; we'll spend a little time at the beginning refreshing all of our memories about the key points from the talk.

If you have a few minutes to prepare in advance, we invite you to take a look at the following excerpts from these readings (email Mattie Burkert for copies: burkert@wisc.edu):

  • Laura Mandell, "What Is the Matter? Or, What Literary Theory Neither Hears nor Sees," New Literary History 38.4 (Autumn, 2007) -- we will focus on the big claims she lays out in the introductory section, which runs from page 755 to the top of page 759.
  • Laura Mandell, introductory chapter to Breaking the Book: Print Humanities in the Digital Age (Wiley-Blackwell, 2015) -- we will again focus on the framing, big-picture parts of the chapter, which you can find on pages 3-9 and page 62.

DHRN is a part of the Borghesi-Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshops in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with support from Nancy and David Borghesi and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Julie Passanante Elman Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Sexual Liberation in a Bubble: Disability, Sexuality, and Teen TV

Julie Passanante Elman
Assistant Professor of Women's and Gender Studies, University of Missouri

Tuesday, April 26, 2016 @ 4:00pm 6191 Helen C. White Hall

This talk analyzes the cultural significance of the "bubble boy" by surveying representations of "real" bubble boys (David Vetter III and Ted DeVita) alongside an early example of the "disease-of-the-week" made-for-TV movie, The Boy in the Plastic Bubble (1976), starring a young John Travolta as Tod, a teenager with a compromised immune system who falls in love with the girl next door. Fusing narratives of science fiction, romance, nationalism, and coming-of-age, Professor Elman argues that the bubble boy became a key disabled cultural figure through which society negotiated ambivalence about scientific technology, masculinity, disability, and sexuality in a new sexually-liberated world. By considering how a medical interst story became reimagined as a teen romantic drama, Professor Elman discusses how rehabilitative edutainment offered an ethical critique of tenchology through its representation of sexual liberation.

Julie Passanante Elman is Assistant Professor of Women's and Gender Studies  at the University of Missouri. She is the author of Chronic Youth: Disability, Sexuality, and US Media Cultures of Rehabilitation (NYU 2014). Her lecture analyzes the cultural significance of the “bubble boy” by surveying representations of “real” bubble boys (David Vetter III and Ted DeVita) alongside an early example of a “disease-of-the-week” made-for-TV movie, The Boy in the Plastic Bubble (1976), starring a young John Travolta as Tod, a teenager with a compromised immune system who falls in love with the girl next door. Fusing narratives of science-fiction, romance, nationalism, and coming-of-age, Prof. Elman argues that the bubble boy became a key disabled cultural figure through which society negotiated ambivalence about scientific technology, masculinity, disability, and sexuality in a new sexually-liberated world. By considering how a medical interest story became reimagined as a teen romantic drama, Prof. Elman discusses how rehabilitative edutainment offered an ethical critique of technology through its representation of sexual liberation.

ACCESSIBILITY: ASL and CART services will be provided for Dr. Elman's lecture and by request for the brownbag. Please contact Jessica Cooley at jacooley2@wisc.edu with accessibility requests or concerns. Please avoid wearing any scented body products or fragrant clothing.

Co-sponsored by the Americanist Lecture Series, the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop for Disability Studies and Disability Activism, the Contemporary Literature Colloquium, the English Department Gender and Sexuality Caucus, and the Disability Studies Initiative.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism

There will also be a brownbag discussion with Elman on Tuesday, April 26th at 1:00pm in University Club 313. The group will discuss the introduction of Chronic Youth (email jdauer@wisc.edu for a copy).

Jakob Hohwy Perception & Cognition

Prediction Error Minimization for Perception and Beyond

Jakob Hohwy
Cognition & Philosophy Lab, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Thursday, April 21, 2016 @ 6:00pm 5181 Helen C. White

This talk first introduces the notion of prediction error minimization and explains how it relates to Bayesian inference. This leads to the idea that the brain uses prediction error minimization to represent – model – the causes of its sensory input. Perception then arises as this internal model’s hypotheses are tested against sensory input. This inferential approach to perception allows quantification of top-down modulation of perception and, in a hierarchical setting, helps identify a reasonable notion of cognitive penetrability. Prediction error cannot be minimized without  learning of the precisions of priors and likelihoods, which fits well with the functional role for attention and explains well its relation to perception. Action, in turn, can easily be understood in prediction error minimization terms, giving rise to a notion of active inference. The prediction error minimization framework then transpires as a very ambitious unified explanation of perception, attention, and action. Though ambitious it is philosophically attractive and scientifically tractable.

Soren Wheeler Sound Studies

Making Radiolab: An Audio Storytelling Workshop with Soren Wheeler

Soren Wheeler
Senior Editor, Producer, and Journalist for Radiolab

Wednesday, April 20, 2016
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Student Activity Center, Caucus Room (4204)

Radiolab is among the most sonically innovative radio shows of the past two decades, as well as a leader in the burgeoning fields of storytelling podcasts and longform narrative journalism. Are you a student pursuing a career in podcasting or just a Radiolab super-fan? Then come join us for a special behind-the-scenes conversation with the show’s Senior Editor, Soren Wheeler. In this workshop-style event, Soren will discuss the writing and research strategies, audio techniques, and other creative decisions that he and his fellow Radiolab producers make during the production of one of the world’s most popular radio programs – distributed to more than 500 U.S. public radio stations and consistently ranking in the Top 10 podcasts on iTunes. This will be an interactive session based primarily around audience questions, making it a truly unique opportunity to dig deep into Radiolab’s production process and to learn how audio storytelling works from one of the masters of the craft.
 
RSVP REQUIRED
This event is free and open to the public. Space is limited, however, and an RSVP is required. Please RSVP to rsvp (dot) uwradiolab AT gmail (dot) com with your name and, if you wish, the name of one guest. Attendees will be selected on a first come, first served basis.

Soren Wheeler is the Senior Editor at the two-time Peabody Award-winning public radio series and podcast Radiolab, where he he plays a variety of roles, including producer, editor, and reporter. He also manages the editorial work of the show, and oversees the development of show content. Soren has won awards for radio pieces about statistics and randomness, the periodic table, and the story of a woman waking up from a coma.

Before coming to Radiolab, Soren was at the Association for the Advancement of Science, where he co-authored the book Atlas of Science Literacy. He spent 6 years as a freelance science education consultant working with science teachers and writing about how students learn science. In 2007, he received a masters degree in science writing from Johns Hopkins University. Since joining Radiolab, Soren has been a visiting lecturer at numerous universities and delivered a wide range of workshops to scientists, journalists, and science communicators.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Elisha Renne Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Chinese and Nigerian Textile Manufacture and Trade

Elisha Renne
Department of Anthropology and Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan

Wednesday, April 20, 2016
12:00pm - 1:00pm
206 Ingraham Hall

The United Nigerian Textiles Limited (UNTL) mill—the largest in northern Nigeria— was established in Kaduna in 1964. UNTL, which represented a partnership between the Hong Kong-based CHA Group and the Nigerian Northern Regional Development Corporation, provided printed cotton textiles to Nigerian and other West African markets until the mill closed in 2007. Nonetheless, the CHA Group continues its involvement in textile manufacturing in Lagos and marketing through its brand of Da Viva® high-quality cotton textiles sold at authorized dealerships throughout Nigeria.

Elisha P. Renne is a professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan. Her book, Cloth That Does Not Die: The Meaning of Cloth in Bunu Social Life, was a 1996 Herskovits Award finalist. Renne’s research in Nigeria focuses on her continuing interest in issues relating to medical anthropology, gender relations, religion, and textiles. During the summer 2005, she received a Fulbright Fellowship to study textile production and gender roles in Zaria, Nigeria, while in 2005-2006, as a fellow in the Michigan Institute of the Humanities, she examined spiritual connections maintained by US members of Nigerian-based churches. Renne’s recent work includes a study of the polio eradication initiative in Northern Nigeria, focusing on the sociocultural and political context of this campaign as well as a study of the connections between textile production, dress, and Islamic reform in northern Nigeria. Since 2010, she has also been involved in a research project which focuses on the health and environmental consequences of small-scale gold mining in northeastern Ghana.

Co-sponsored by African Studies Program

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Laura Mandell Digital Humanities Research Network

Gender and Big Data: Finding or Making Stereotypes?

Laura Mandell
Professor of English and Director of the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture, Texas A&M University

Friday, April 15, 2016
4:00pm - 5:30pm
SLIS Commons, 4207 Helen C. White Hall

Center for the History of Print & Digital Culture Annual Lecture. Reception with light refreshments to follow.

In his book Macroanalysis, Matthew Jockers argues that we have reached a “tipping point.” Now that we have so much digital data, we can use techniques and methodologies used to explore big data: text mining, topic modeling, machine learning, named entity recognition, etc. Two problems confront digital literary historians of women writers who wish to apply these methodologies. First, the number of women writers who published works before 1800 in Britain and America, as well as the number of their publications that have been preserved, is small compared to men, a problem compounded by how few works by early modern women writers are currently being digitized: roughly 4% of 307,000 volumes in the Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online were written by women writers.  Second, many of the data analysts currently comparing what they call “female writing” to “male writing” propagate rather than interrogate stereotypes about women and women writers.

Sociologists have worked on such problems, and in this talk, I will outline some of their strategies and discuss how literary critics who wish to perform macroanalysis might make use of them.  Data scientists in the commercial world have worked on the problem of representing minorities “fairly” even when they are represented by a small sample. Thanks to the robust history of feminist theory and criticism, we have the means for generating vocabularies, taxonomies, and ontologies for semantic searching and supervised topic modeling that differ from those generated through big-data techniques that naïvely privilege historically oppressive discourses. Second, the need to shift from quantitative to qualitative analysis (and back again) is augmented when analyzing textual data produced by minorities. I argue that, once again, the concern for social justice enhances intellectual work by effectively demonstrating the inadequacies of claiming “new” discoveries based upon “statistical significance” alone.

Laura Mandell is a Professor of English at Texas A&M University, where she also directs the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture. Her 2015 monograph, Breaking the Book: Print Humanities in the Digital Age, explores the cognitive consequences and emotional effects of human interactions with physical books and reveals why the traditional humanities disciplines are resistant to digital humanities. She is also the author of Misogynous Economies: The Business of Literature in Eighteenth-Century Britain (1999)  as well as the editor of a Longman Cultural Edition of The Castle of Otranto and The Man of Feeling. Her article in New Literary History, “What Is the Matter? What Literary History Neither Hears Nor Sees,” describes how digital work can be used to conduct research into conceptions informing the writing and printing of eighteenth-century poetry. She is Project Director of the Poetess Archive, on online scholarly edition and database of women poets, 1750-1900,  Director of 18thConnect, and Director of ARC, the Advanced Research Consortium overseeing NINES, 18thConnect, and MESA. Her current research involves developing new methods for visualizing poetry, developing software that will allow all scholars to deep-code documents for data-mining, and, as part of the eMOP project, improving OCR software for early modern and 18th-century texts via high performance and cluster computing.

Additional support provided from the CHPDC, Visualizing English Print, and the Middle-Modernity Group.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network.

Gene DeAnna Sound Studies

A Conversation with Gene DeAnna

Gene DeAnna
Head, Recorded Sound Section at the Library of Congress; Curator, National Jukebox Project

Wednesday, April 13, 2016
4:00pm - 5:30pm
University Club Room 313

DeAnna will hold an informal coffee talk/discussion session discussing his role at the Library of Congress and one of its key projects, the National Jukebox website. The website has changed how we access historic recordings and the session will address how these, and other new digital archives, enable access to sounds and our interactions with them. DeAnna is here as part of the World Records Symposium (April 14-15) hosted by the Mayrent Institute for Yiddish Culture and sponsored by the Center for the Study of Upper Midwestern Cultures, the School of Music, and the Mills Music Library. The Sound Studies group is thankful to the folks at the Mayrent for carving out some time for members of our group to spend some time with DeAnna, and we encourage you to check out the full listing of events they have planned.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.edu. About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Thomas Padilla Digital Humanities Research Network

Data Praxis in the Humanities

Thomas Padilla
Digital Scholarship Librarian, Michigan State University

Tuesday, March 29, 2016
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

Thomas Padilla will talk with us about the theory and practice of doing computationally inflected work in the Humanities. This conversation will draw on Padilla's experience exploring and communicating the concept of data in the Humanities, studying data use and research data production in the Humanities, articulating the primary value that data curation plays in Digital Humanities research and pedagogy, and will extend to consider the benefits and considerations that should be taken into account when working with objects commonly studied in the Humanities as data. 

Thomas Padilla is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Michigan State University Libraries. He publishes, presents, and teaches widely on Humanities data, data curation, and data information literacy. Thomas serves as an Editor for DHCommons Journal and dh + lib Data Praxis. Thomas also currently serves as co-convener of the Association of College and Research Libraries Digital Humanities Interest Group.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Thomas Padilla Digital Humanities Research Network

Libraries and the Digital Humanities: Familiar Roles, New Possibilities

Thomas Padilla
Digital Scholarship Librarian, Michigan State University

Tuesday, March 29, 2016
12:00pm - 1:00pm
126 Memorial Library

Thomas Padilla will talk with us about his experience growing library Digital Humanities engagement at Michigan State University. In particular he will focus on the opportunities that the Digital Humanities offer for highlighting both existing and potential library value as it pertains to people, services, and collections.   

Thomas Padilla is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Michigan State University Libraries. He publishes, presents, and teaches widely on Humanities data, data curation, and data information literacy. Recent national and international presentation and teaching venues include but are not limited to: the annual meeting of the American Historical Association, the Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching Institute, Digital Humanities, the Digital Library Federation, and Advancing Research Communication and Scholarship. Thomas serves as an Editor for DHCommons Journal and dh + lib Data Praxis. Thomas also currently serves as co-convener of the Association of College and Research Libraries Digital Humanities Interest Group.

Co-sponsored by the UW-Madison Libraries.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network.

A Film/Performance by Jesse Malmed Art + Scholarship

Untitled (Just Kidding)

A Film/Performance by Jesse Malmed
Curated by Alexandra Lakind

Saturday, March 12, 2016 @ 1:00pm Madison Public Library Central Branch, 3rd floor

Untitled (Just Kidding) is a short experimental film, with performative elements. It is a series of works playing and plays working in creative reading, studied density, the one-(hundred)-liner, choirs, screen texts, the bootleg, the cover, jokes, speculative etymologies, accents, loops, the cinemagic, body swaps, poetry, citation and human voice.

Conceptually engaged, language-intensive and visually mesmerizing, this suite scrambles somewhere in the intersects of conceptual comedy, dizzying illogics, the poetic plu-future and sustainable sourcing. Through deliberate mistranslation and strategic denaturing of languages and codes, Malmed revels in revealing their extra-communicative potential as sound, as image, as object, and shifting audiences’ concepts of the show, of the cinema. Unexpect the expected.

Free and open to the public.

Jesse Malmed is an artist and curator, working in video, performance, text, occasional objects and their gaps and overlaps. He’s recently exhibited at Roots and Culture, the Chicago Cultural Center, Cinema Contra (Denver), Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Microlights (Milwaukee) and the University of Chicago Film Studies Center. Present curations include Live to Tape Artist Television Festival, programming at Nightingale Cinema, the mobile exhibition space Trunk Show (with Raven Falquez Munsell), programming through ACRE TV, and the recently inaugurated Western Pole. Jesse earned his BA and MA at Bard and University of Illinois at Chicago, respectively, and currently teaches at UIC.

Alexandra Lakind is pursuing a joint PhD in Curriculum & Instruction and Environment & Resources at UW-Madison. Her academic work focuses on the design of environments geared towards participatory learning and the intricacies of the Anthropocene. Through implicit and explicit, academic and performative routes, she hopes to foster supportive communities prepared to process unanswerable dilemmas together. She is a graduate of Interlochen Arts Academy, holds a BA from the Royal Scottish Academy in Contemporary Performance Practice, and an MA from NYU in Educational Theater.

This programming is co-presented by The Bubbler at Madison Public Library and the Art + Scholarship Borghesi-Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with support from Nancy and David Borghesi and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

About the Art + Scholarship Borghesi-Mellon Workshop
 
Luis Armando Ordaz Gutiérrez Art + Scholarship

Participatory Workshop and Artist Talk

Luis Armando Ordaz Gutiérrez
Executive and Artistic Director of ProyectoTeatro

Thursday, March 10 through Saturday, March 12

Presented by KALEIDOSCOPE Conference of the graduate students of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and ART + SCHOLARSHIP Borghesi-Mellon Workshop. Curated by Marin Laufenberg, Megan Bailon, and Nicole Fadellin.

Participatory Workshop: Exploring What You Are Not Supposed To
Thursday, March 10th 7:00-9:00pm
6321 Humanities

To RSVP, email: teatrodecimopiso@gmail.com

In this workshop for youth and adults, participants will have the opportunity to explore subject matters that impact their daily life, but that they are not encouraged to address for various reasons. Starting with inquiry-based conversations, we will throw down topics or situations that we would like to share and dissect—individually or collectively—as points of reference for the workshop. From there, we will write pieces of theatre (poetry or monologues) and create dance phrases (contemporary, hip-hop, or folklórico) to build short sequences of performance that express our points of view and unfiltered perspectives.

Artist Talk: Fracturing the boundaries of theatre for youth by redefining the limits of performance, societal norms, and cultural aesthetics 
Saturday, March 12th 11:00am-12:30pm
313 Pyle Center

Boundaries, in an overall sense of the word, guide children as they grow up to be happy, healthy and productive members of society. But boundaries, in the context of art on the other hand, often hinder creativity and take away a child’s opportunity to become a true empowered artist or a proud cultural activist. Award-wining director Luis Armando Ordaz Gutiérrez shares the cultural gains of fostering an inquiry-based pedagogy that challenges the generic Western-European template of theatre for youth by allowing children to question (and at times break) all the rules they’ve been taught to follow on stage. 

About the visiting artist:

Luis Armando Ordaz Gutiérrez is the Co-founder and Artistic Director of ProyectoTeatro, a Spanish-language performing arts company based out of Austin, Texas. His work straddles culture, research, and performance art in order to highlight the Latino experience within the US and the world around. Luis is also recognized for developing culturally relevant arts programming that preserves and promotes the entire spectrum of Latin-American culture. Artistically, his work is driven by a commitment to riveting aesthetics and challenging conventional theatre blending theatre and dance to create visceral scenes of profound and multidisciplinary stage performance. Luis has had the opportunity to travel to countries like México, Thailand, Panama, and Perú to inspire communities to address social matters and political instabilities through performance and to find the strength and pride in their cultural backgrounds through community collectiveness. 

About the curators:

Marin Laufenberg is a PhD candidate in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She studies contemporary Latin American literature with a focus in Southern Cone performance and theatre. Her research interests include post dictatorship literature and performance that deal with residual trauma and memory of violence through an affective lens. In her dissertation, she develops the role of humor and laughter in dealing with trauma and violence in Argentine theatre which treats historical moments of crisis. In addition to her academic study of theatre, she is an active member and co-founder of the Spanish language theatre group Teatro Décimo Piso at UW-Madison.  

Megan Bailon is a PhD candidate and Teaching Assistant in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, where she studies Latin American literature, theater, and performance.  Her research interests center on the themes of labor and migration in contemporary Caribbean theater and performance art. Along with being a past participant in the UW Public Humanities Exchange, where her project involved running a community theater club at a local middle school, she is an organizer of the Kaleidoscope Graduate Student Conference and a co-founder and collaborator in the Teatro Décimo Piso departmental theater group.

Nicole Fadellin is a PhD candidate and Teaching Assistant in the Spanish and Portuguese Department at UW-Madison. Her research considers materiality and promises in contemporary Caribbean literature. Her personal and professional work seeks to construct inclusive and collaborative spaces and explore alternative forms of creating and sharing knowledge. She participated in Madtheory 2: A Performance Philosophy Symposium, she was co-creator of a community theater club at Cherokee Middle School through the Public Humanities Exchange, and she is a co-founder and member of Teatro Décimo Piso Departmental theater group.

Funding is provided by Associated Students of Madison, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Brittingham Fund, Kemper Knapp Bequest, LACIS and The Nave Fund. This programming is co-presented by the Kaleidoscope Conference of the graduate students of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Art + Scholarship Borghesi-Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Humanities, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with support from Nancy and David Borghesi and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

For more information about ProyectoTeatro, click here: proyectoteatro.com
For more information about the Kaleidoscope Conference, click here: vanhise.lss.wisc.edu/kaleidoscope/?q=node/7
For more information about Art + Scholarship, click here: artandscholarship.wordpress.com

Marcus Cederström and Colin Connors Digital Humanities Research Network

These Canoes Carry Culture: The Intersection of Public and Digital Humanities

Marcus Cederström and Colin Connors
Ph.D. Candidates, Scandinavian Studies

Tuesday, March 8, 2016
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

We'll be hearing from Marcus Cederström and Colin Connors from Scandinavian Studies. Their presentation, "These Canoes Carry Culture: The Intersection of Public and Digital Humanities," will explore what it means to be a public scholar in the digital age by examining a collaborative project between Anishinaabe artist Wayne (Mino-Giizhig) Valliere—an Anishinaabe language and culture teacher from Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin—Anishinaabe students from Lac du Flambeau, faculty and students from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, as well as Madison-area community members. The project resulted in an Ojibwe birchbark canoe that is on permanent display at Dejope Residence Hall, a short documentary film, a blog, a website, and a Facebook community page.

Links to spark discussion: 

All four of these are products of the canoe project.

 

Marcus Cederström is a Ph.D. candidate on the Folklore track of Scandinavian Studies. His research focuses on Scandinavian immigration to the United States, the role of immigrants in the labor movement, and identity formation as well as North American indigenous communities and sustainability. He is a member of a team of folklorists working on Wiigwaasi-Jiimaan: These Canoes Carry Culture, a public humanities project that began in 2013.

Colin Connors is a Ph.D. candidate in the Folklore track of Scandinavian Studies. Colin’s research focuses on the Viking Age in topics of archaeology, saga studies, folklore, religion, and popular culture. He is part of the Folklore/Public Humanities project Wiigwaasi-Jiimaan: These Canoes Carry Culture and he also leads the eSaga Project, supported by the UW Libraries and Department of Information Technology (DoIT).

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

David H. Shinn Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

China and Africa: An Evolving Relationship

David H. Shinn
Former U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia and Burkina Faso; Adjunct Professor, George Washington University

Thursday, March 3, 2016
4:00pm - 5:30pm
5246 Law School

Since the beginning of the 21st century, there has been a sharp increase in interaction between China and the 54 countries of Africa. In 2009, for example, China became Africa’s largest trading partner, passing the United States. After discussing China’s interests in Africa, this presentation will look at the government-to-government, trade, investment, aid, education, media, and military/security ties between China and Africa. It will also identify the challenges and problems that China faces in Africa. During the question and answer period, Dr. Shinn will be happy to explain how this relationship impacts the United States and the role of additional emerging nations in Africa. The lecture is a result of a book he co-authored titled China and Africa: A Century of Engagement.

David Shinn (Ph.D., Political Science) has been teaching in the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University since 2001. He previously served for 37 years in the U.S. Foreign Service with assignments at embassies in Lebanon, Kenya, Tanzania, Mauritania, Cameroon, Sudan and as ambassador to Burkina Faso and Ethiopia. 

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Regional and International Studies and the Alexander Hamilton Society.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

David H. Shinn Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Hizmet in Africa: The Gülen Movement

David H. Shinn
Former U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia and Burkina Faso; Adjunct Professor, George Washington University

Thursday, March 3, 2016
1:00pm - 2:00pm
280 C Science Hall

Fethullah Gülen, a Turkish Islamic philosopher of Sufi persuasion, has been living in exile in rural Pennsylvania for more than ten years. His beliefs and writings have resulted in a significant following by many Turkish nationals around the world. The followers of Fethullah Gülen call their movement Hizmet, the Turkish word for service, although it is better known as the Gülen movement. This presentation will focus on the activities of Hizmet in the 54 countries of Africa, especially their business activities, schools, dialogue centers, humanitarian assistance, and media outreach. The movement promotes a moderate brand of Islam that emphasizes tolerance and interfaith dialogue. Hizmet once had cordial ties with the government of Turkey but a falling out in 2013 has developed into a bitter relationship.The speaker is the author of Hizmet in Africa: The Activities and Significance of the Gülen Movement.

David Shinn (Ph.D., Political Science) has been teaching in the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University since 2001. He previously served for 37 years in the
U.S. Foreign Service with assignments at embassies in Lebanon, Kenya, Tanzania, Mauritania, Cameroon, Sudan and as ambassador to Burkina Faso and Ethiopia.

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Regional and International Studies, the Center for the Humanities, and the Alexander Hamilton Society

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Glaire D. Anderson Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Celestial & Poetic Bodies: ‘Abbas Ibn Firnas & Cordoban Spaces of Science (Public Lecture)

Glaire D. Anderson
Associate Professor of Art History, University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill

Friday, February 26, 2016 @ 4:00pm L140 Conrad A. Elvehjem Building

‘Abbas Ibn Firnas (d. 887), a Cordoban polymath and courtier, is representative of Islamic Iberia's participation in the early Islamic scientific revolution. He is famous for carrying out an early aeronautics experiment that has long been celebrated as the first successful human flight. Beyond the interest for history of science, Ibn Firnas' experiment, which is said to have taken place at the first Cordoban royal villa, also suggests intriguing connections with Islamic art, architecture and visual culture. In my talk I propose that this polymath’s career as a notable Andalusi court intellectual, designer, and ‘maker’ of scientific spaces and objects may illuminate overlooked connections between science, the arts, and design practices in al-Andalus and early Islamic courts.

Glaire D. Anderson is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Her specialty is Islamic art and architecture during the caliphal period, especially Iberia and North Africa. Medieval Islamic and Christian artistic interchange and female patronage are topics of her current work. Anderson is author of The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval Iberia: Aristocratic Estates and Court Culture in Umayyad Córdoba (2013) and co-editor of Revisiting al-Andalus: Perspectives on the Material Culture of Islamic Iberia and Beyond (2007). 

Glaire D. Anderson Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Workshop with Pre-circulated Reading for Graduate Students and Interested Faculty

Glaire D. Anderson
Associate Professor of Art History, University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill

Friday, February 26, 2016 @ 10:30am L170 Conrad A. Elvehjem Building

Reading (contact Lisa Cooper for password)

Anderson, Glaire D. "A mother’s gift? Astrology and the pyxis of al-Mughīra." Journal of Medieval History 42.1 (2016): 107-130.

Robert Goldstone Perception & Cognition

Getting Perception to Do What We Want

Robert Goldstone
Indiana University, Program in Cognitive Science and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

Wednesday, February 24, 2016 @ 12:00pm 6191 Helen C. White

Perceptual learning is a powerful way for an individual to become tuned to frequently recurring patterns in its specific local environment that are pertinent to its goals. In classic conceptions of perceptual modules, people have access to the modules’ outputs but no ability to adjust the modules’ internal workings. However, humans routinely and strategically alter their perceptual systems via training regimes that have predictable and specific outcomes. In fact, employing a combination of strategic and automatic devices for adapting perception may be one of the most promising approaches to improving cognition. In this talk, Goldstone will describe mechanisms by which perception and cognition interact, informed by evidence from perceptual and category learning experiments, and cases of people hacking their own perceptual systems.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Perception and Cognition

Colin Conors Digital Humanities Research Network

The eSaga Project: Mediating Medieval Narratives with Oral, Textual, and Digital Technologies

Colin Conors
Ph.D. candidate, Folklore & Scandinavian Studies

Tuesday, February 23, 2016
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

We'll be hearing from Colin Connors, a Ph.D. candidate in the Folklore track of Scandinavian Studies. Colin's research focuses on the Viking Age in topics of archaeology, saga studies, folklore, religion, and popular culture. He is part of the Folklore/Public Humanities project Wiigwaasi-Jiimaan: These Canoes Carry Culture and he also leads the eSaga Project, supported by the UW Libraries and Department of Information Technology (DoIT). 

His presentation will be titled "The eSaga Project: Mediating Medieval Narratives with Oral, Textual, and Digital Technologies."

Before this meeting, we suggest you take a look at these short readings:

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Laura M. Tilghman Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Who Needs the Village? Rural-Urban Migration and Linkages in Northeastern Madagascar

Laura M. Tilghman
Assistant Professor, Plymouth State University

Friday, February 19, 2016
3:30pm - 4:30pm
180 Science Hall

Scholars have argued that African city residents have fortified their linkages to rural areas as a survival strategy in the face of urban decline following neoliberal restructuring and economic crises. Tilghman examines the ways in which rural resources factor into livelihood strategies of rural-urban migrants in northeastern Madagascar, based on over 2 years of ethnographic research. She analyzes the degree to which migrants’ livelihoods have a rural basis, and whether individuals with “stronger” linkages to their home villages indeed have more resources and greater wellbeing. She argues that transaction costs and norms of reciprocity dampen the ability of rural linkages to subsidize urban residence, in effect making life in the city particularly difficult for its poorest residents.

Laura M. Tilghman (PhD, University of Georgia) is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. She has conducted research in Madagascar since 2002 on a variety of topics including entomophagy and ethnobotany, equity issues related to bioprospecting, social and environmental impacts of small-scale sapphire mining, and rural to urban migration. She has recently begun research with Malagasy migrant communities in China, Canada, and the United States.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Geography.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Emily Clark, Elizabeth Scheer, and Mckenna Kohlberg Art + Scholarship

Public Humanities & Community Arts

Emily Clark, Elizabeth Scheer, and Mckenna Kohlberg

Friday, February 19, 2016
2:00pm - 4:00pm
3255 College Library

Arts and humanities organizations can help young researchers forge relationships for community-based collaborations through courses and other programs. This workshop features accounts of working with local cultural programs and a new certificate in Public Humanities. Presenters include Emily Clark, Associate Director, UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, Elizabeth Scheer, Oakhill Prison Humanities Project, UW-Madison English Department, and Mckenna Kohlberg, Simpson Street Free Press.

Emily Clark is Associate Director of the Center for the Humanities at UW-Madison. She received her PhD from UW-Madison, where she studied and taught in both the English and Gender and Women’s Studies departments. Her work has been published in journals including Hypatia, Feminist Review, and the Center’s own Humanities NOW blog. Prior to joining the Center, Emily served as Deputy Director of the Center for 21st Century Studies at UW-Milwaukee.

Elizabeth Scheer is a PhD Candidate in the English Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds a BA in English from Haverford College and an MA in Romantic poetry from the University of Oxford. Before pursuing her PhD, Liz also worked as a middle school art teacher in Philadelphia. Her research interests include Romanticism (both British and American), political theory, and contemporary visual culture, particularly public art practices.

Mckenna Kohlenberg is a recent graduate of UW-Madison. She currently works as a Literacy Specialist at an after-school academics non-profit and as a Legal Assistant at a criminal defense firm. She hopes to attend law school in the fall of 2017.

This event is co-hosted by UW DesignLab and the New Scholars Network student organization, and co-sponsored by the UW-Madison Center for the Humanities, Center for Design & Innovation, Art + Scholarship Borghesi-Mellon Workshop, and the UW-Madison Graduate School Office of Professional Development.

About the Art + Scholarship Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Laura M. Tilghman Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Mandehandeha Mahita Raha: New Immigrant Destinations and Madagascar’s Pivot to China

Laura M. Tilghman
Assistant Professor, Plymouth State University

Wednesday, February 17, 2016
12:00pm - 1:00pm
206 Ingraham Hall

As immigration to Western countries becomes increasingly difficult, many people in Madagascar are switching their gaze to China for educational and economic opportunities. Preliminary findings and future directions for research with the Malagasy diaspora in Guangzhou, China will be presented. In particular, this presentation will explore the historical and cultural context of the transnational linkages between these two countries, and the strategies migrants use to adapt without a large community of compatriots upon whom they can rely.

Laura M. Tilghman (PhD, University of Georgia) is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. She has conducted research in Madagascar since 2002 on a variety of topics including entomophagy and ethnobotany, equity issues related to bioprospecting, social and environmental impacts of small-scale sapphire mining, and rural to urban migration. She has recently begun research with Malagasy migrant communities in China, Canada, and the United States.

Co-sponsored by African Studies Program

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Tara Wood Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Listening to Students with Disabilities: Cultivating a Campus of Responsive Agents (Public Lecture)

Tara Wood
Assistant Professor of English, Rockford University

Friday, February 12, 2016
3:30pm - 5:00pm
6191 Helen C. White

Although students with disabilities are gaining entrance into institutions of higher education at an increasing rate, entrance and access aren’t always synonymous. Students with disabilities face considerable barriers to access in classrooms and campus spaces, and one of the predominant barriers is faculty perception of disability. How can we change perception? Stories change perception, hearing new experiences that test one’s current view of the way the world operates. We need to listen to the stories that disabled students have to tell. We need to provide spaces for them to emerge, and we need to allow those stories to challenge and change us. ASL interpretation and CART services will be provided. Please contact Jessica Cooley at jacooley2@wisc.edu by February 2 for additional accessibility services.

Powerpoint slides for Dr. Wood's talk available here.

This program is co-sponsored by the English 100 Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism

Jennifer Stoever Sound Studies

Sound Studies and Digital Humanities Publishing: A Roundtable Discussion

Jennifer Stoever
Associate Professor of English, Binghamton University, State University of New York

Friday, February 12, 2016
12:30pm - 2:00pm
313 University Club Building

What venues exist for multimedia publishing for scholars who study sound? What is the future of digital publishing in the humanities? How can we engage new audiences? In this informal brown bag session, Jennifer Stoever, co-founder and editor-in-chief of Sounding Out!, will lead a discussion on publishing sound-based research in the digital humanities. 

Jennifer Stoever is Associate Professor of English at Binghamton University, State University of New York. She has published research in Social Text, Social Identities, Modernist Cultures, American Quarterly and Radical History Review, among others. Her book, The Sonic Color-Line, will be published this Fall by NYU Press. She is also co-founder and editor-in-chief of Sounding Out!: The Sound Studies Blog, a major digital forum for sound studies scholarship, community, art, and podcasts.

These events are sponsored by SoundStudies@UW, a Borghesi-Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Humanities, with support from the Center for the Humanities.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.eduAbout the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Tara Wood Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Workshop for Instructors: Access-centered Pedagogy: Navigating "Advantage," Standards, and Instructor-Ethos

Tara Wood
Assistant Professor of English, Rockford University

Reading: See links

Friday, February 12, 2016
12:00pm - 1:15pm
6172 Helen C. White

Dr. Tara Wood is an Assistant Professor of English at Rockford University where she teaches courses in rhetoric, writing, and body studies. Her research focuses on writing pedagogy, disability studies, and rhetorics of disclosure. Dr. Wood has published in journals such as Composition Studies, Open Words: Access and English Studies, and Kairos, and is also the co-author of the WPA-CompPile Bibliography in Disability Studies. Since 2014, she has served as Chair of the Standing Group for Disability Studies within CCCC (Conference on College Composition and Communication). She is currently working on a book project that analyzes the accessibility and accommodation experiences of students with disabilities in college writing classrooms.

In this workshop, participants will be invited to examine their syllabi and/or assignments as access rhetorics and to discuss the barriers, conflicts, and possibilities they communicate to students. Additionally, the workshop will involve engagement with access scenarios, pulled from Professor Wood’s own qualitative research. Please contact Jessica Cooley at jacooley2@wisc.edu by February 2 for accessibility services.

Handouts: 

This program is co-sponsored by the English 100 Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism

Jennifer Stoever Sound Studies

The Sonic Color-Line: Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening (Public Lecture)

Jennifer Stoever
Associate Professor of English, Binghamton University, State University of New York

Thursday, February 11, 2016
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, Room L140

In this talk, which draws on her forthcoming book (NYU Press, 2016), Jennifer Stoever amplifies an ongoing historical conversation between black writers and musical performers about listening’s role in black self-hood, agency, citizenship, and racial discrimination. At once literary study, performance analysis, cultural history, media study, and critical race theory, Stoever's work reveals race’s audible contour—the sonic color-line—and gives an account of key case studies in sound recording's first hundred years. What is the historical relationship between sonic and visual racial regimes? How have racialized American listening practices—and attendant sonic racial representations—emerged, spread, and changed over time? How has the sonic color-line shaped and been shaped by the rise of audio reproduction technologies and representational discourses such as literature, journalism, and music?

This public lecture will be followed by a Q&A with Dr. Stoever. This keynote lecture is hosted by the Communication Arts Media and Cultural Studies Colloquium.

Jennifer Stoever is Associate Professor of English at Binghamton University, State University of New York. She has published research in Social Text, Social Identities, Modernist Cultures, American Quarterly and Radical History Review, among others. Her book, The Sonic Color-Line, will be published this Fall by NYU Press. She is also co-founder and editor-in-chief of Sounding Out!: The Sound Studies Blog, a major digital forum for sound studies scholarship, community, art, and podcasts.

These events are sponsored by SoundStudies@UW, a Borghesi-Mellon Interdisciplinary Workshop in the Humanities, with support from the Center for the Humanities. The keynote lecture is hosted by the Communication Arts Media and Cultural Studies Colloquium.

For more information about SoundStudies@UW and upcoming events, visit our website, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter @UWSoundStudies. To join our listserv, email join-soundstudies@lists.wisc.eduAbout the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Samantha Abrams Digital Humanities Research Network

Archiving Web Materials

Samantha Abrams

Tuesday, February 9, 2016
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

This time, we'll be talking about archiving web materials with Samantha Abrams, an early-career archivist and a student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s iSchool. Samantha works at Culver’s as a corporate archivist, and at the Madison Public Library, where she is assisting with the launch of a hyper-local Web archiving program. She is also involved in the development of a personal archiving lab at the Madison Public Library, through which patrons will have the opportunity to learn how to digitize and preserve personal items from home: photographs, home videos, and more.

Before this meeting, we suggest you take a look at these short readings:

– Ed Summers, “The Web as a Preservation Medium”

Archive.org, “The Wayback Machine Hits 400,000,000,000!”

– Wikipedia, “Web archiving”

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Marie Helene Koffi-Tessio Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Reading East-Asian Characters in Francophone African Films

Marie Helene Koffi-Tessio
Assistant Professor, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Thursday, February 4, 2016
12:00pm - 1:00pm
1418 Van Hise

Asian characters have been rather scarce in Francophone African films. And yet, echoing the increased visibility, in the media, of Chinese in Africa, contemporary West and Central African filmmakers are making East-Asian characters a recurrent figure. This paper explores these filmic inclusions that mirrors global patterns of migration and asks to what extent they seek to represent, challenge or foresee African changing ethnic landscapes.

Marie-Helene Koffi-Tessio (PhD, Princeton University) is an assistant professor of French and Francophone Studies at Hobart & William Smith Colleges. Her articles and reviews have appeared in Francofonia, Présence Francophone and The American Book Review. Her current research project focuses on connections between West African and East Asian countries, specifically in the fields of culture and the arts. She is working on an article that traces the representations of East-Asian characters in Francophone African films.

Co-sponsored by Department of African Languages and Literature.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Chuck Rybak Digital Humanities Research Network

Building Undergraduate DH: A Conversation with Chuck Ryback

Chuck Rybak
Associate Professor of English and Humanistic Studies, University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Tuesday, January 26, 2016
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

For this meeting, we’re very lucky to be hosting guest speaker Chuck Rybak, Associate Professor of English and Humanistic Studies at UW-Green Bay. He is a creative writer, a digital humanist, and a blogger who chronicles the politics of higher education in Wisconsin. He’ll be talking with us about building digital humanities at the undergraduate level. We’ll discuss broad issues of pedagogy, as well as specific tools that can be useful for undergraduate DH (Commons in a Box, Reclaimed Hosting, etc.).

To prepare for the meeting, we ask you to take a look at this link.

Follow along on Twitter at @UWDigHum; join the conversation at #uwdh.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Susanna Siegel Perception & Cognition

Perception and Social Consciousness (Public Lecture)

Susanna Siegel
Edgar Pierce Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University

Wednesday, December 16, 2015 @ 3:30pm 6191 Helen C. White

Culturally entrenched outlooks such as stereotypes can permeate the mind, and influence the character of an individual's perception. Susanna Siegel discusses the impact of racial attitudes on perception, their consequences for what perceivers can reasonably believe, and draw out the implications for Reasonable Person standards in US law.

Susanna Siegel is the Edgar Pierce Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University, a chair held in the past by B.F. Skinner, Willard van Orman Quine, and Charles Parsons. Siegel’s primary research is in the philosophy of mind and epistemology.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Perception and Cognition

Martin Mueller Digital Humanities Research Network

Data Janitoring

Martin Mueller
Professor Emeritus, English and Classics, Northwestern University

Tuesday, December 8, 2015
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

Professor Mueller will discuss with the group the use of undergraduates and retirees to crowd-source the cleaning of textual data in large corpora, such as the EEBO-TCP corpus that has come up a few times this semester in our meetings. He's interested in developing systems that combine machine learning methods with human labor to clean large, messy sets of incompletely transcribed texts, while also reconciling the conflicting expectations that researchers from different fields have when working with textual data. We expect this conversation will build on our earlier discussions about text mining and corpus curation, while giving us an opportunity to address some of the questions of labor that are a major concern for sustainability in digital humanities. 

To prepare for this meeting, we ask you to take a glance at Professor Mueller's blog, Scalable Reading. The following entries are particularly relevant in setting up some of the issues we'll be discussing: 

You can read more about Professor Mueller's wide-ranging research here.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Robert McRuer Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Workshop with Robert McRuer

Robert McRuer
Professor of English, George Washington University

Tuesday, December 8, 2015 @ 10:00am 313 University Club Building

Dr. McRuer will hold a brown bag lunch with interested faculty, students, and community members to discuss passages from his recent work. Please RSVP to Ramzi Fawaz at fawaz@wisc.edu to receive copies of the readings.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism

Robert McRuer Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Cultural Locations of Crip Theory (Public Lecture)

Robert McRuer
Professor of English, George Washington University

Monday, December 7, 2015 @ 4:00pm 6191 Helen C. White

McRuer will consider some of the complex and at times contradictory ways in which the project of “crip theory” has emerged from disability culture, art, activism, and theory. McRuer trace both the multivalent history of “crip” as noun, adjective, and verb, and some of the ways in which it has crossed borders, traveling across various locations and languages. The project of crip theory is deeply connected to the history of queer activism and theory, even as it is more obviously (and simultaneously) an embodied, corporeal alternative to those global projects.

Robert McRuer’s work focuses on queer and crip cultural studies and critical theory. He is in the process of completing a book titled Crip Times: Disability, Globalization, and Resistance, considering locations of disability within contemporary political economies and the roles that disabled movements and representations play in countering hegemonic forms of globalization. His first book centered on contemporary lgbt writers, particularly lgbt writers of color, and his most recent book attends to cultural sites where critical queerness and disability contest heteronormativity and compulsory able-bodiedness. He is a Professor in the Department of English at The George Washington University, where he teaches queer theory, disability studies, and cultural studies. He is the author of Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability (NYU, 2006) and The Queer Renaissance: Contemporary American Literature and the Reinvention of Lesbian and Gay Identities (NYU, 1997). He is co-editor of Sex and Disability (2012) and Desiring Disability: Queer Theory Meets Disability Studies (2003). His articles have appeared in PMLARadical History Review, Gendersthe Journal of Medical Humanities, and numerous other scholarly venues.

ASL interpreter and CART services will be provided for Dr. McRuer's talk and are available by request for the brownbag. Please contact Jessica Cooley at jacooley2@wisc.edu by December 1st with accessibility requests or concerns.

Dr. McRuer's visit has been made possible by hard work and generous support from The Americanist Speaker Series, Contemporary Literature, The Borghesi-Mellon Workshop for Disability Studies and Disability Activism, The McBurney Disability Resource Center-- Division of Student Life, The English Department Gender and Sexuality Caucus, and the Disability Studies Initiative.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism

Sound Resources and Archives on Campus Sound Studies

Sound Archives

Sound Resources and Archives on Campus

Friday, December 4, 2015
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Mills Music Library Meeting Room, B162 Memorial Library

A discussion about the sound resources we have on campus/the community and the issues facing sound archivists in the digital age. The session will feature brief presentations by Ellen Brooks, (Oral Historian, Wisconsin Veterans Museum), Paul Hedges (Emerging Technologies Archivist and Audio Archivist, Wisconsin Historical Society), Troy Reeves (Head of Oral History Program, UW-Madison Archives) and Tom Caw (Music Public Services Librarian, Mills Library).

Check out the full details and participant bios on the Sound Studies website.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop.

Kristin Eschenfelder Digital Humanities Research Network

Beyond the Spreadsheet: Conceptualizing Sustainability

Kristin Eschenfelder
Professor and Director, School of Library and Information Studies, UW-Madison

Tuesday, December 1, 2015
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

First, Bronwen Masemann, Faculty Associate Librarian at SLIS, will deliver a lightning talk about her plans for her Spring 2016 course, "Digital Humanities Project Toolkit." The course, which was first offered in Spring 2015, provides a hands-on introduction to data-driven, collaborative approaches and technologies in humanities research. She is particularly looking for discussion about possible collaborations between students and DHRN members. If you have a problem related to data, metadata, visualization, grant-writing or preservation, and would like to partner with a team of enthusiastic students from SLIS, she would love to hear from you! The course is open to graduate students and senior undergraduates from departments outside SLIS, as well as SLIS students. Further information on the Spring 2015 class is available at: https://sites.google.com/a/wisc.edu/slisdhtoolkit15/.

Then we'll spend most of the meeting hearing from Kristin Eschenfelder, who will be giving a talk titled "Beyond the Spreadsheet: Conceptualizing Sustainability." She says: 

"My talk will explore how theoretical perspectives on organizational sustainability can inform the design or analysis of institutions whose mission is long term preservation of digital resources (digital archives). The sustainability of digital archives is a growing concern as researchers, archival practitioners, and project funders seek to ensure that invested resources have enduring benefits. I will compare five theoretical frameworks that promote different ways of thinking about the concept of an organization’s sustainability. Different emphases of the frameworks include internal skill capacities, environmental monitoring, the turbulence of external environments, governance and relationships, and changes in use communities and target resources. The talk will not offer any magical solutions to sustainability challenges, but it will hopefully make participants think about organizational sustainability in new ways."

Kristin Eschenfelder is a Professor and Director at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is also an affiliate of the Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies, the School of Journalism and Mass Communications and a founding board member of the Wisconsin Digital Studies program. Her research interests focus on information access, sharing and rights management. She writes about use regimes – or the complex, multi-level networks of laws, customs, technologies and expectations that shape what information we can access in our daily lives and how we can make of it. Her recent work examines development of and changes to access and use regimes for data archives and digital scholarly works including electronic publications (journals, books, citation databases), digital cultural materials (such as museum, archival or anthropological works), and data sets. Her past work explored web based government information and policy and management issues inherent in digital production of government information and records. She has also published in the areas of public libraries and financial literacy.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

May Tan-Mullins Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Messy Aid: The Geopolitical Implications of Chinese Engagement in Africa’s Energy Sectors

May Tan-Mullins
Associate Professor of International Relations, Nottingham University

Monday, November 23, 2015
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Science Hall Room 444

Chinese enhanced role in Africa’s energy sector since 2000s has evoked a parochial imagination of China-Africa relations, with China being labelled as a ‘neo-colonialist’, a ‘rogue creditor’ and an ‘imperialist’. This is because many of the Chinese projects in the African’s energy sector are intertwined with aid, trade and investment, prompting imaginaries of a dragon ‘scrambling for resources’ and threatening good governance practices. However, recent data shown the picture is more varied with a range of winners and losers, dependable on local specifics and the nature of the industries. This paper builds on fieldwork data from Angola, Ghana and Nigeria, and evaluates the differential outcomes of Chinese aid and investment practices in the renewable (hydropower) and non-renewable (oil and gas) energy sectors of these countries. The paper will conclude with a discussion questioning is there a “Chinese way” of cooperation and South-South development model emerging from evolving China-Africa energy relations, and examine the importance of China’s increasing responsibilities as a rising power in global governance. 

This event is part of the Yi-Fu Tuan Lecture Series of the Department of Geography.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Markus Cruse Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Placemaking in the Manuscripts of Marco Polo’s Travel Account (Public Lecture)

Markus Cruse
French, Arizona State University

Friday, November 20, 2015 @ 4:00pm 7191 Helen C. White

This presentation will discuss the techniques employed by manuscript designers to make Marco Polo’s travel account meaningful, and what these techniques tell us about the work’s early reception. Polo’s text is a seminal document in Western history, yet the very features that made it so important – the descriptions of unfamiliar places, peoples, customs, objects, animals, etc. – also posed a significant problem for copyists: How do you represent this new and remarkably diverse world? The Polo manuscripts offer unique insight into the cupidity, curiosity, anxiety, and awe that attended discovery in the late Middle Ages. 

Markus Cruse is Associate Professor of French at Arizona State University. His research interests encompass urbanism in medieval France, Alexander the Great in the Middle Ages, medieval travel literature and depictions of the east in medieval literature, the history of Paris, and Haitian literature. His bookIlluminating the Roman d'Alexandre (Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Bodley 264): The Manuscript as Monument (D.S. Brewer, 2012), examines a 14th-century illuminated romance manuscript as the embodiment of courtly values, urban spectacle, princely education, and crusade ideology. His current book project is on the Old French manuscripts of Marco Polo's travel account.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Matt Gilchrist, Tom Keegan, and Jeremy Morris Sound Studies

Sound, Communities, Archives

Matt Gilchrist, Tom Keegan, and Jeremy Morris
IDEAL (Iowa Digital Engagement and Learning) Lab; UW-Madison Department of CommArts

Friday, November 20, 2015
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Media Studio B (2242B), College Library

This workshop will focus on designing assignments that involve podcasts and other audio recordings, to increase student engagement in courses and in the sounds and sonic culture of their local cities.

This workshop is part of a series of professional development workshops called “Game B for Scholars” every third Friday in in the fall presented by the New Scholars Network for Humanists and Social Scientists.

Sponsored by New Scholars Network and DesignLab. Co-sponsored by the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop of the Center for the Humanities, Graduate School Office of Professional Development, and Center for Design and Innovation.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop. About the New Scholars Network.

Markus Cruse Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Workshop with Pre-circulated Reading for Graduate Students and Interested Faculty

Markus Cruse
French, Arizona State University

Friday, November 20, 2015 @ 10:30am 7191 Helen C. White

Reading (contact Lisa Cooper for password)

Markus Cruse is Associate Professor of French at Arizona State University. His research interests encompass urbanism in medieval France, Alexander the Great in the Middle Ages, medieval travel literature and depictions of the east in medieval literature, the history of Paris, and Haitian literature. His book Illuminating the Roman d'Alexandre (Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Bodley 264): The Manuscript as Monument (D.S. Brewer, 2012), examines a 14th-century illuminated romance manuscript as the embodiment of courtly values, urban spectacle, princely education, and crusade ideology. His current book project is on the Old French manuscripts of Marco Polo's travel account.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

DHRN Digital Humanities Research Network

Regular Workshop Meeting

DHRN
"Cool Tools" Session

Tuesday, November 17, 2015
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

This week we're excited to offer a "Cool Tools" session, featuring a number of brief presentations from DHRN members about digital tools we use in our day-to-day work -- Tiki Toki, Scrivener, Canva, NVIVO, and R for tabular data, to name just a few! If you'd like to participate, please email Brianna (brianna.marshall@wisc.edu) by Thursday, 11/12. Talks are expected to be short -- around 5 minutes each -- so this is a very quick and informal opportunity to share something that makes your job easier or more fun.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Works-in-Process Meet Up Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Works-in-Process Meet Up

Friday, November 13, 2015
10:00am - 11:30am
Sterling Hall 3331

Are you working on a disability-related research or activism project? Would you like to talk to other, like-minded, folks about the process? 

Most of all, would you like to hear about exciting work happening all over the greater-Madison area?

If so, join us for "What's in Progress," your chance to talk about current projects with your friends and colleagues in the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Disability Studies and Disability Activism. Cookies, coffee, and a little light structure will be provided, so that every participant has the opportunity share, listen, and learn from the wealth of experience in our community. You are welcome to bring questions about your current projects, or just sit back and listen.

To RSVP, please email rachel.herzlbetz@wisc.edu or visit our facebook event page. For accessibility needs, please email jacooley2@wisc.edu

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism

Lesley Nicole Braun Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Braving Borders: Congolese Trader Women’s Sojourns to China (Public Lecture)

Lesley Nicole Braun
Postdoctoral Fellow, Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago

Wednesday, November 11, 2015 @ 4:00pm 8417 Social Science Building

In Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, a new middle class is emerging, and women are at the forefront of this social transformation. Among these women are a group referred to as femmes commerçantes (trader women) who travel to Southern China on buying expeditions to purchase goods such as mobile phones and other electronics to re-sell in Congo. Trader women with international travel experience, and knowledge about complex visa bureaucratic processes associated with import activity, position themselves as advisors and leaders for new hopeful traders—some of whom are illiterate and only speak Lingala. Social networks are crucial for successful buying trips, and it is imperative that trader women forge relationships with people in both China and Congo to finance their trips and assist in navigating customs. Social networks forged outside of a woman’s kin group often poses threats to men, which can in turn motivate distrust between the genders.

Transnational femmes commerçantes, are not only an important part of a changing economic landscape, they are also representative of changing gender dynamics in Kinshasa. How do Congolese at home regard this emerging class of women? Do trading activities impact women’s intimate relationships with men? What are the ways in which traders expand their social networks to increase business opportunities? While Congolese men who conduct business abroad acquire prestige—they are seen as worldly or cosmopolitan—this research examines whether, for women, this new status comes at a cost: the cost of their personal reputation as “virtuous women.”

Lesley Nicole Braun holds a doctorate degree in Anthropology from the University of Montreal, and is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Comparative Human Development at the University of Chicago. Her research is positioned at the intersection of Cultural Anthropology and African Studies, and has taken her to the Democratic Republic of Congo where she conducted fieldwork for eighteen months. In Braun’s PhD dissertation entitled “Dancing Double Binds: Feminine Virtue and Women’s Work in Kinshasa, DRC,” she explores how young female concert danseuses challenge the status and role of women in Congolese society—specifically through increased visibility in popular culture and new media technology. Through ethnographically grounded research, she calls attention to the moral ambiguities of transactional sex in Congo, and the semiotic, affective, and material ways in which femininity is built and conceptualized. Braun’s current research, funded by Quebec’s Fonds de Recherche sur la Société et la Culture, focuses on transnational movements of Congolese female entrepreneurs, or femmes commerçantes. These migrant trader women embark on international buying expeditions to purchase goods, such as electronics, to re-sell in Congo. Currently, China is a common destination, which points larger phenomena associated with increasing interconnections between the two countries.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

UW Researchers Sound Studies

Sound Session #1

UW Researchers

Friday, November 6, 2015
2:00pm - 4:00pm
Media Studio B (2242B), College Library

In this workshop we will host series of brief presentations by members of the UW-Madison Community whose work intersects with sound in various ways. Join us for a chance to learn more about the work of researchers below, and to connect with member of the Sound Studies Community.

Lisa Hollenbach: Ph.D Student, English and Public Humanities Fellow, UW-Madison Center for the Humanities and The Rabble, LLC. Research interests include: 20th-21st-century American literature, poetry and poetics, experimental writing, media studies, sound studies, and post-1945 U.S. culture and history.

Damon Sajnani: Assistant Professor, African Languages and Literature and critically acclaimed Hip Hop artist. Research interests include: Africana cultural studies, social and political theory, HipHop studies, critical race theory, and cultural sociology.

Steve Ridgley: Associate Professor, East Asian Languages & Literature. Research interests include: Modern Japanese literature, pop culture, transasian studies

Joseph KoykkarProfessor, Dance and accomplished composer. Research interests include: composing for concert music, composing music for dance, film, video, etc., music/audio software/hardware applications, and the aesthetics of contemporary music popular music from 1960 to the present.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Peter Gorman and Bronwen Masemann Digital Humanities Research Network

Workshop on the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) and Digital Humanities Project Toolkit

Peter Gorman and Bronwen Masemann

Tuesday, November 3, 2015
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

This week we're excited to offer a hands-on workshop led by Peter Gorman, Assistant Director for Digital Library and Preservation Strategy for the University of Wisconsin-Madison General Library System.

Peter will give an introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI), "a consortium which collectively develops and maintains a standard for the representation of texts in digital form. Its chief deliverable is a set of Guidelines which specify encoding methods for machine-readable texts, chiefly in the humanities, social sciences and linguistics” (http://www.tei-c.org/). He will show how TEI markup can be used at escalating levels of complexity, from rough structuring of page images/OCR to critical editions to morphological segmentation of texts. He will also show examples of how TEI texts may be linked to external data sources such as geographic and personal name authorities.

We'll also hear a lightning presentation from Bronwen Masemann, a Faculty Associate Librarian at SLIS. Bronwen teaches in the MA program in Library and Information Studies and is the collections librarian at the SLIS Laboratory Library. She will be discussing her plans for her Spring 2016 course, "Digital Humanities Project Toolkit." The course, which was first offered in Spring 2015, provides a hands-on introduction to data-driven, collaborative approaches and technologies in humanities research. She is particularly looking for discussion about possible collaborations between students and DHRN members. If you have a problem related to data, metadata, visualization, grant-writing, or preservation, and would like to partner with a team of enthusiastic students from SLIS, she would love to hear from you! The course is open to graduate students and senior undergraduates from departments outside SLIS, as well as SLIS students.

Further information on the Spring 2015 class is available at: https://sites.google.com/a/wisc.edu/slisdhtoolkit15/

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Anthony Bale Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Mount Joy: Emotions, Vistas, and Medieval Mountaineering in the Holy Land (Public Lecture)

Anthony Bale
English and Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London

Friday, October 23, 2015 @ 4:00pm 7191 Helen C. White

This lecture will consider the meanings and uses of the hilltop site near Jerusalem known to Western visitors since the Crusader-era as Mount Joy. Mount Joy, from which crusaders and pilgrims gained their first view of the holy city, has for a long time been an important site for interaction with holy space and religious feeling, although it has been little studied. Mount Joy, with emotion inscribed in its name, makes a useful case-study of the sentimental construction of a landscape. Using a wide range of texts and images, this talk will consider the meanings of medieval joy, of vistas of Jerusalem, and what it meant to premodern people to scale and look out from a mountain.

Professor Bale’s visit has been made possible with the generous support of the Brittingham Foundation.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Mia Mingus Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Our Future is Practice: Practice Yields the Sharpest Analysis and Clearest Vision Forward (Public Lecture)

Mia Mingus
Writer, Educator, and Organizer for Disability Justice

Friday, October 23, 2015 @ 4:00pm 1310 Sterling Hall

This event free and open to the public, is wheelchair accessible, and will feature American Sign Language interpretation and Real-Time Captioning. The talk will be followed by a reception.

In her talk, Mingus will share some of her visions and lessons from her work on transformative justice and life-long activism and organizing. More people than ever are hungry for responses to violence that don't rely on police, prisons or the criminal legal system; and are recognizing the intersectional nature of these responses as both a great challenge and great opportunity in liberation and social justice work. Transformative Justice and community accountability (TJCA) offer compelling analysis and visions, but the gulf between this and the practice of TJCA seems impassable. How do we begin to engage in this work, especially when we know that addressing intimate and state violence continue to be integral to ending gender oppression and giving us any shot at the world we long for.
 

Mia Mingus is a writer, community educator and organizer working for disability justice and transformative justice responses to child sexual abuse. She is a queer physically disabled Korean woman transracial and transnational adoptee, born in Korea, raised in the Caribbean, nurtured in the U.S. South, and now living in Northern California. She works for community, interdependency, and home for all of us, not just some of us, and longs for a world where disabled children can live free of violence, with dignity and love. As her work for liberation evolves and deepens, her roots remain firmly planted in ending sexual violence. Mingus’ work on disability justice in particular is widely used and cited across educational, activist, and political spaces. She has published in multiple academic anthologies including in the forthcoming volumes Octavia’s Brood: Sci-Fi from Social Movements and The Wind is Spirit: A Bio/Anthology of Audre Lorde. Mingus is known nationally and internationally for her activism, writing, and public lectures, which are notable for their accessibility to a wide audience while still presenting challenging and complex approaches to idea of justice, identity, and political change.

This talk is the Gender and Women’s Studies Department’s 40th Anniversary Keynote Address. Co-sponsors include The Disability Studies/Disability Activism Borghesi-Mellon Workshop, The McBurney Disability Resource Center, The Office of Student Life, Department of History, Department of Afro-American Studies, University Health Services, Gender and Women's Studies Club, GSAFE - Creating Just Schools for LGBTQ+ Youth, Institute for Research in the Humanities, Wisconsin Women's Studies Consortium, The Center for Research on Gender and Women; with support from the Anonymous Fund of the College of Letters & Science, the Kemper K Knapp Bequest Fund, and the Lectures Committee General Fund.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism. More information about the keynote: http://www.genderandwomensstudies.org/.

Anthony Bale Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Workshop with Pre-circulated Reading for Graduate Students and Interested Faculty

Anthony Bale
English and Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London

Friday, October 23, 2015 @ 10:30am 7190 Helen C. White

Reading (contact Lisa Cooper for password)

Anthony Bale is Professor of Medieval Studies in the Department of English and Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London. His interests are in late medieval English literature, culture, and popular religion. In particular, his research has explored Christian ideas about Jews and Judaism, the poetry of John Lydgate, the cult of St Edmund, Sir John Mandeville and his Book, pain and affect in medieval religion, the representation of Jerusalem, the history of imprisonment and, now, The Book of Margery Kempe. He is the author of The Jew in the Medieval Book: English Antisemitisms 1350-1500 (Cambridge, 2006) which was awarded a Koret Foundation Jewish Studies Publications Program award and the 2006/7 Ronald Tress Prize and Feeling Persecuted: Christians, Jews and Images of Violence (Reaktion, 2010), which was awarded the 2011 Beatrice White Prize by the English Association. He is the editor of a new edition and translation of Sir John Mandeville’s Book of Marvels and Travels, which appeared from Oxford University Press in 2012, and of The Book of Margery Kempe, which appeared in 2015, and he was recently awarded a Distinguished International Research Fellowship at the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, based at the University of Melbourne.

Professor Bale’s visit has been made possible with the generous support of the Brittingham Foundation.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Howard French Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Continents in Motion: How Today's China-Africa Encounter Came About and What it Means for the World (Public Lecture)

Howard French
Associate Professor of Journalism, Columbia University

Thursday, October 22, 2015 @ 7:00pm AT&T Lounge, First Floor, Pyle Center

In this talk, French will talk about the processes that began drawing large numbers of new Chinese migrants to Africa in the early to mid 1990's, and then speak to the question of the global geopolitical and economic setting that pushed events in this direction, albeit with some surprising outcomes. These include the end of Maoism, the launching of China's reform and opening period, the end of the Cold War, and what has come to be known by some as the War on Terror.

Howard French is associate professor of Journalism at Columbia University. From 1990 to 2008, he reported overseas for The New York Times as bureau chief for Central America and the Caribbean, West and Central Africa, Japan and the Koreas, and China. During this time, his coverage was twice nominated for the Pulitzer Prize; he was twice the recipient of an Overseas Press Club Award. He is the author of China’s Second Continent: How a Million Migrants are Building a New Empire in Africa, which was named one of 100 Notable Books of 2014 by The New York Times, and was cited by The Economist, The Guardian, and Foreign Affairs as one of the best books of 2014.

French's visit is also supported by the Institute for Regional and International Studies and the African Studies Program.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Mia Mingus Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Brownbag Talk on Disability Justice

Mia Mingus
Writer, Educator, and Organizer for Disability Justice

Thursday, October 22, 2015
11:00am - 12:30pm
7191 Helen C. White

Mia Mingus will give a brown bag talk on disability justice for 20 minutes, then lead a conversation with attendees. 

Mia Mingus is a writer, community educator and organizer working for disability justice and transformative justice responses to child sexual abuse. She is a queer physically disabled Korean woman transracial and transnational adoptee, born in Korea, raised in the Caribbean, nurtured in the U.S. South, and now living in Northern California. She works for community, interdependency and home for all of us, not just some of us, and longs for a world where disabled children can live free of violence, with dignity and love. As her work for liberation evolves and deepens, her roots remain firmly planted in ending sexual violence.

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism

Mark Vareschi and Morgan Lemmer-Webber Digital Humanities Research Network

Lightning Presentations

Mark Vareschi and Morgan Lemmer-Webber

Tuesday, October 20, 2015
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

Mark Vareschi: "Counting Nothing"

In this lightning presentation, Mark will discuss the difficulties of searching for anonymous texts in Eighteenth Century Collections Online and how he worked around the limits of the web-based user interface. 

Mark Vareschi [Vuh - res - key] is an Assistant Professor in the department of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work in eighteenth-century literature and culture is situated at the intersection of literary history, media studies, and digital humanities. He has published in Eighteenth-Century Life and the journal Authorship. He has an essay forthcoming in English Literary History and is completing his book manuscript entitled “Everywhere and Nowhere: Anonymity and Mediation in Eighteenth-Century England.”  He has received fellowships from The Folger Shakespeare Library, the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University, and the NEH. He recently completed a fellowship at the Center for 21st Century Studies at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee.

Morgan Lemmer-Webber: "Analyzing Merchant Ledgers from 1753-1756"

Morgan will discuss her work extending a research project that was done in collaboration with the American Enterprise exhibit recently launched at the Smithsonian. She and Professor Ann Martin have a database of a 10% representative sample of the entries in a merchant's ledger from the years 1753-1756. Morgan is currently creating supplemental data sets (such as all of the women patrons) to analyze spending patterns. She will give an introduction to the project and explain the goals the project wishes to accomplish and the issues she's running into. She hopes that the group can help brainstorm methods of data visualization for the project. Here are links to two brief background articles:

http://news.wisc.edu/23867

http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/decoding-colonial-ledger

Morgan Lemmer-Webber specializes in classical art and archaeology with a focus on gender relations and women’s agency. Her research studies the ways in which changing depictions of women in ancient art reflect their position within the social hierarchy. She is particularly interested in women’s role in textile production, the persistence and adaptation of classical ideals of femininity, and women’s presence in the public world.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Craig Eley Sound Studies

A Resonant Boom: Supersonic Flight, Psychoacoustics, and Environmental Sound

Craig Eley
ACLS Public Fellow, WPR

Thursday, October 15, 2015
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Vilas 4028

This talk examines the relationship between jet engines and environmental sound media in the United States through the sound of the sonic boom. The boom emerged in the early 1950s into a cultural moment dominated by hi-fi audio, where demonstrations of loud sounds inside and outside the home were markers of masculinity and military power. But as the sonic boom moved to commercial applications in the 1960s, it was met with opposition from a grassroots coalition of scientists, authors, and environmental activists who argued for quietude as a natural resource and even a human right.

Craig Eley completed his Ph.D. in American studies at the University of Iowa where he specialized in the history of environmental sound recording. He is currently an ACLS Public Fellow working as a Digital Producer for the nationally syndicated radio show, To the Best of Our Knowledge.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Deidre Stuffer Digital Humanities Research Network

Workshop on Text Digitization and Curation

Deidre Stuffer
PhD Candidate in Literary Studies

Tuesday, October 6, 2015
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

The topic of this meeting will be text digitization and curation, with a focus on the subscription database Early English Books Online as a case study in the promise and perils of digitizing and encoding the cultural record.

We are very fortunate to be hearing from Deidre Stuffer, who will start off the meeting with a lightning presentation titled "Always Already Encoded: Digital Curation and the Visualizing English Print Project." In it, she will discuss her work curating an early modern drama corpus for Visualizing English Print. Extracting plain text from digital artifacts isn’t as straightforward an operation as it may seem, given the imbricated nature of text and code. Deidre will describe the human and computational levels of editorial intervention behind the drama corpus, offering not only principles for curating text-based corpora, but a dose of sympathy for those who tangle with text extraction and character encoding.

About Deidre:
Deidre is a Ph.D. student in literary studies at UW-Madison, and she serves as a Research Assistant and Digital Bibliographer for the multi-institutional, Mellon-funded Visualizing English Print Project. A specialist in 18th-century British Literature, her research focuses on the history of reading and writing technologies, mediation, material networks, and Early Modern English dictionaries.

Following and building on Deidre's talk, we'll have an informal conversation about digital surrogacy and text analysis. The following brief readings are recommended both to provide context for Deidre's work and to form a common foundation for our discussion. (Although we welcome you to join even if you don't have time to look over these pieces!) 

Contact Mattie Burkhert if you have trouble with those links or would like access to a PDF copy of the readings.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Planning Workshop Sound Studies

Sound Studies Meetup

Planning Workshop

Friday, October 2, 2015
3:30pm - 4:30pm
Media Studio B (2242B), College Library

Join for a working group meeting of the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop. We'll spend the first part of the meeting doing general introductions and sharing current plans for the year. We'll end by soliciting some ideas from the group, followed by more informal discussions at Der Rathskeller or somewhere else close by.

The first part of the meeting will consist of general introductions, then the working group will share our current plans for the year. We’ll end by soliciting some ideas from you, and more informal conversations over drinks (likely at Der Rathskellar or somewhere close by). For any of you interested in being more involved in the group’s planning and operations, the working group will be meeting just before that (2:30pm-3:30pm) in the same room. We invite you to join us and help shape what this group can and will do this year (though if you just want to come for the social stuff at the end, we understand).

Please RSVP at http://goo.gl/forms/KYzamA2Tcc

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Film Screening Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago (2013)

Film Screening

Friday, October 2, 2015 @ 3:00pm 7191 Helen C. White

For over 1,000 years, millions of people from all over the world have traveled the trail to the medieval pilgrimage site of Santiago to Compostela, where the bones of the apostle Saint James are said to be buried. In 2010 alone, over 270,000 people attempted the arduous trek on the Camino de Santiago, each one a seeker of something. In the Middle Ages, pilgrims sought forgiveness of their sins and admission to heaven, and the Camino remains, for many, a quest of faith. Others begin with no spiritual impetus in mind, but nevertheless are drawn to examine their personal beliefs and life purpose. And others are in it simply for the intense physical challenge. Whatever their motivation, no one can predict just how their path will unfold, who they will meet, what personal demons or angels they will face, or what transformations they will undergo by the trail’s end. “Walking the Camino” is an up-close look at one of humanity’s most time-honored traditions. By following pilgrims from all walks of life as they attempt to cross an entire country on foot with only a backpack, a pair of boots and an open mind, we witness the Camino’s magnetic and miraculous power to change lives. Driven by an inexplicable calling and a grand sense of adventure, each pilgrim throws themselves heart-and-soul into their physical trek to Santiago and, most importantly, their personal journey to themselves.

For the trailer, see here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJDxD_UE4ZQ

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Gay Seidman Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Workshop: Discussion of Chinese Identity Politics and South African Society

Gay Seidman
Professor of Sociology, UW-Madison

Reading: Park, Yoon Jung. 2008. A Matter of Honour: Being Chinese in South Africa. Lexington Books

Thursday, October 1, 2015
4:00pm - 5:00pm
313 University Club Building

Our discussion this week will be organized in a form of a round-table discussion focusing on Yoon Jung Park's A Matter of Honor: Being Chinese in South Africa. The session will be mainly Q&A from the reading, especially two excerpts: Introduction and Chapter 3 “The Symbolic Center: the Influence of China, real and Mythical.” If you want to receive the soft copy of the excerpt, please reply to the email address: chinaafricamadison@gmail.com 

Dr. Yoon Jung Park will come to Madison and give a talk at the African Studies Program on Oct 7. More information can be found here: http://africa.wisc.edu/?page_id=9109

This discussion section will focus on Chineseness and identity formation among the South African Chinese and the questions of state (China) influence, or lack of it, on the formation of that identity. Feel free to come up with any other question from any section of the book or elsewhere concerning the Chinese-South Africa relations.

We have invited Prof. Gay Seidman to participate in our discussion. Prof. Seidman is Professor of Sociology and specializing Sociology of economic change and development, labor, gender, social movements. She has done extensive research in South Africa, and she will share her insights into South Africa, such as immigration, race and socioeconomic development. Kevin Wamalwa, a PhD student in African Languages and Literature, will host the discussion.  

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Linda Mary Montano Art + Scholarship

The Return of Chicken Woman: Linda Mary Montano Flies Home

Linda Mary Montano

Thursday, October 1 through Friday, October 2

Legendary feminist performance artist and University of Wisconsin-Madison alum Linda Mary Montano returns to Madison for an interactive artist talk, workshop, and performance. Montano’s first major performance Chicken Woman (1972) was based on her MFA sculpture show The Chicken Show (1969) in the Art Department at UW-Madison. She went on to become a major pioneer in living sculpture and life/art performance. Returning to her roots, Montano will now present a new site-specific Chicken Woman performance based upon her early work.

Please come dressed like a chicken or dress in one chakra/rainbow color to all events if you wish. All events are free and open to the public. Visit artandscholarship.wordpress.com for more information.

Workshop: Thursday, October 1, 12:00pm – 2:00pm
RSVP required; email art.scholarship.mellon@gmail.com to RSVP

12:00-1:00:  A one-hour exploration of methods to empty out nightly news mind and appreciate an alternative consciousness. Wear loose clothing, and dress in all one color if you wish or come as a chicken. Bring something to lie down on.

1:00-2:00:  Walk & bawkkk with Chicken Woman to the Agriculture Department. Maybe we will see the chickens.

Artist Talk:  Thursday, October 1st, 7:00pm – 8:30pm
Madison Museum of Contemporary Art (227 State Street) Lecture Hall

Featuring Ron Kean, Poultry Specialist

In 1969, for my MFA, I showed 9 chickens in 3 large chicken wire sculpture-cages on the roof of the new Humanities Building. For my show I also rode around Madison with chicken sounds coming from my car loudspeaker and installed chicken sounds on my phone’s answering machine. Why chickens: because I spent more time with them on campus than I did in "school" while I was a grad student at UW-Madison. Bawkkkkkkkk, bawkkkkkkkk.

Durational Performance:  Friday, October 2nd, 12:00pm – 7:00pm
Curatorial Lab, Art History Department, Conrad A. Elvehjem Building
800 University Ave, North Entrance, 1st Floor

Come and visit with Chicken Woman. Ask any question about your art or life. Receive a chicken drawing.

Co-sponsored by Madison Museum of Contemporary Art and UW-Madison Art Department, Art History Department, Center for Visual Cultures, DesignLab, English Department, and Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies.

About the Art + Scholarship Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Workshop Kick-Off Event Disability Studies/Disability Activism

Workshop Kick-Off Event

Tuesday, September 29, 2015 @ 5:30pm Der Stiftskeller, Memorial Union

Join the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Disability Studies/Disability Activism members at the Rathskeller for drinks and conversation. Come meet other folks from the university and community interested in disability studies and activism. We'll introduce this year's line-up of events and welcome your ideas--and your enthusiasm and questions.

Der Stiftskeller is adjacent to Der Rathskeller in Memorial Union at 800 Langdon St. Enter through the west entrance (closest to Park Street).

About the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Disability Studies / Disability Activism

Peter Cusack Sound Studies

Discussion: "Musical Ecologies in a Damaged World"

Peter Cusack
Sound Artist

Wednesday, September 23, 2015
12:00pm - 2:00pm
212 University Club Building

A workshop around the work of Peter Cusack, with Gregg Mitman, Craig Eley, Frederic Neyrat, and Andrew Salyer. We will discuss Cusack’s works and several art clips (Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel, John Cage, Pierre Schaeffer, etc)

Peter Cusack is a sound artist, and a research fellow and member of CRiSAP (Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice) at the University of the Arts, London. His visit is supported by the Center for Visual Cultures.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Peter Cusack Sound Studies

Sonic Journalism: Sounds from Dangerous Places (Public Lecture)

Peter Cusack
Sound Artist

Tuesday, September 22, 2015
5:00pm - 7:00pm
Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, L140

Peter Cusack asks “what can we learn from dangerous places by listening to their sounds?" The talk will include recordings and photographs from Chernobyl, the Caspian Oil fields, and the Aral Sea, Kazakhstan and will forcus on how “dangerous places” (military zones, polluted areas, etc.) can be both sonically and visually compelling, even beautiful and atmospheric.

Peter Cusack is a sound artist, and a research fellow and member of CRiSAP (Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice) at the University of the Arts, London. His visit is supported by the Center for Visual Cultures.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Chris Lupton Digital Humanities Research Network

Workshop on Communities of Practice

Chris Lupton
DoIT

Tuesday, September 22, 2015
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

This meeting will build on our last conversation, which centered on the question "What would a sustainable DH presence look like on the UW-Madison campus?" (That said, attendance last time is in no way a prerequisite for participation in our next meeting!)

We'll be coming at this question from a new angle with the guidance of Chris Lupton from DoIT's Department of Academic Technology. Chris will introduce us to research on Communities of Practice and lead us in a discussion about how that research can inform our approach to sustaining our DH community. She asks that participants think a bit in advance about these questions:

  • What is the value to you of a sustainable DH? To campus? 
  • What are some steps that DHRN can take to move in this direction?

Christine Lupton is the manager of Faculty Engagement Community Programs in the Department of Academic Technology, where she has worked since 2000. These programs provide support to faculty, staff, and instructors for transforming teaching and learning through technology, by exploring, developing, and evaluating Communities of Practice. She keeps her hand in teaching through a Chadbourne Residential College First Year Interest Group and several evening courses for returning adult learners at Concordia University.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network

Jacques Lezra Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

The Fetish of Al-Andalus (Public Lecture)

Jacques Lezra
Comparative Literature and Spanish, New York University

Friday, September 18, 2015 @ 4:00pm 7191 Helen C. White

Convivencia--living-together, notionally as practiced by Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Spain under Arab rule, between 711 and 1492--became topical outside Hispanist and medievalist circles after the attacks of September 11, 2001 and the Atocha bombings in Madrid, in 2004. Topical, because convivencia seems to promise an alternative to violence, to fundamentalism, to exclusion and sectarianism: an "ornament of the world," Maria Rosa Menocal famously titled her book about the Andalusi period.  What has this fantasy of convivial togetherness made possible, intellectually and socially, in the past fifteen years?  How has the fetish of al-Andalus worked to disfigure the study of the period? What have our contemporary fetishes inherited or acquired from that fantasy of conviviality?  What can we think, not think, desire and not desire in its wake?  

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Edward Friedman and Kevin Wamalwa Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Workshop on Chinese Presence and its Impacts on Africa

Edward Friedman and Kevin Wamalwa
UW-Madison Professor Emeritus in Political Science; PhD Student in African Languages and Literature

Friday, September 18, 2015
12:00pm - 1:00pm
280C, Science Hall (Geography Library, Hartshorne Room)

Join for a discussion of the China-Africa relationship in general, and particularly the discourse of "friendship" in this context. Please bring your insightful perspectives to the table. The workshop has invited Prof. Edward Friedman to participate in our discussion. Prof. Friedman is Professor Emeritus in Political Science and specializes in China's international relations. He has published articles on China-Africa topics. Suggested reading is "How Economic Superpower China Could Transform Africa" in Journal of Chinese Political Science, 2008. This discussion will be led by Kevin Wamalwa, a PhD student in African Languages and Literature, who is doing a project on Chinese education in East Africa. 

Feel free to bring your lunch. Snacks and drinks provided.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Post-colonial Consciousness: Representations of China in Africa

Jacques Lezra Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Workshop with Pre-circulated Reading for Graduate Students and Interested Faculty

Jacques Lezra
Comparative Literature and Spanish, New York University

Friday, September 18, 2015 @ 10:30am 7190 Helen C. White

Reading: Lezra, “Contingency in Translation” (2015). Email Lisa Cooper for the password to protected readings.

Jacques Lezra is Professor of Spanish, English, and Comparative Literature at New York University.  His most recent book is Wild Materialism: The Ethic of Terror and the Modern Republic (Fordham, 2010; Spanish translation, Siglo XXI/Biblioteca Nueva, Spring 2012; Chinese translation March 2013 from Peking University Press).  A book on Cervantes, Contra los fueros de la muerte: El suceso cervantino, collecting articles and unpublished essays, as well as the Cervantes chapters from his first book, Unspeakable Subjects: The Genealogy of the Event in Early Modern Europe, is forthcoming in Spanish from Polifemo.  A book entitled On the Nature of Marx’s Things is in preparation.  Lezra has published articles on Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, contemporary and early modern translation theories and practices, Freud, Althusser, Woolf, and other topics.  He is the co-translator into Spanish of Paul de Man’s Blindness and Insight.  With Emily Apter and Michael Wood, he is the co-editor of the translation into English of the Vocabulaire européen des philosophies (Seuil 2004; ed. Cassin; English translation forthcoming 2014 from Princeton University Press).  With Paul North, he edits the Northwestern University Press book series IDIOM.

About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Imagines Mundi: The Global Middle Ages

Jonathan Sterne Sound Studies

Workshop: Sound Pedagogy: A Seminar for Sound Teaching

Jonathan Sterne
Professor and James McGill Chair in Culture and Technology, Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University

Friday, September 18, 2015
10:00am - 12:00pm
212 University Club Building

While sound has long been central to various academic disciplines, audio brings its own distinct challenges and opportunities as a tool to teach with and through. The recent emergence of Sound Studies as an interdisciplinary field of study, however, has spurred increased attention toward sound as a tool for teaching and engaging with new generations of students. In this collaborative workshop hosted by the Borghesi-Mellon Workshop on Sound Studies, Jonathan Sterne will lead participants in a discussion about their sound-based courses, as well as share syllabus and assignment ideas for teaching sound-based theory and practice courses. (Participants should RSVP to jwmorris2@wisc.edu and read Sterne’s “Sound Pedagogy” article before attending the workshop).

Jonathan Sterne's research is concerned with the cultural dimensions of communication technologies, especially their form and role in large-scale societies. In addition to extensive work on sound and music (The Audible Past, MP3: The Meaning of a Format), he has published over fifty articles and book chapters that cover a wide range of topics in media history, new media, cultural theory and disability studies. His visit is supported by Comm Arts, the Borghesi-Mellon Sound Studies Workshop, and The Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Jonathan Sterne Sound Studies

The Strange Case of Missile Mail: A Drone Archaeology (Public Lecture)

Jonathan Sterne
Professor and James McGill Chair in Culture and Technology, Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University

Thursday, September 17, 2015
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, L140

On June 8, 1959, the U.S. Post Office collaborated with the U.S. Navy on an experimental mail missile launch from a submarine off the coast of Florida. Missile mail represented an extension of the Post Office’s long-term strategy of adopting new transportation technologies for the movement of mail and an orchestrated attempt to domesticate missiles and encourage U.S. citizens to understand technologies of warfare in other terms, as normal parts of commerce and everyday life. In this keynote lecture, Jonathan Sterne considers missile mail as the post office’s last grab at transportation innovation, before they turned their focus to information technologies like ZIP codes and optical character recognition. He will also consider the 1959 launch as a historical allegory that can help us understand attempts to commercialize and popularize “unmanned” drones today.

Jonathan Sterne's research is concerned with the cultural dimensions of communication technologies, especially their form and role in large-scale societies. In addition to extensive work on sound and music (The Audible Past, MP3: The Meaning of a Format), he has published over fifty articles and book chapters that cover a wide range of topics in media history, new media, cultural theory and disability studies. His visit is supported by Comm Arts, the Borghesi-Mellon Sound Studies Workshop, and The Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Jonathan Sterne Sound Studies

Histories of Sound, Media and Signal Processing (Brown Bag Discussion)

Jonathan Sterne
Professor and James McGill Chair in Culture and Technology, Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University

Thursday, September 17, 2015
12:30pm - 2:00pm
8411 Social Sciences Building

For the last decade, Sterne has been studying the cultures and institutions that have developed around digital audio technologies. In this brown bag talk, sponsored by the Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies, Sterne will discuss that work in progress, focusing on the centrality of signal processing to contemporary music, and what it might tell us about broader changes in media and technological cultures. A Q&A session will follow.

Jonathan Sterne's research is concerned with the cultural dimensions of communication technologies, especially their form and role in large-scale societies. In addition to extensive work on sound and music (The Audible Past, MP3: The Meaning of a Format), he has published over fifty articles and book chapters that cover a wide range of topics in media history, new media, cultural theory and disability studies. His visit is supported by Comm Arts, the Borghesi-Mellon Sound Studies Workshop, and The Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies.

About the Sound Studies Borghesi-Mellon Workshop

Fall 2015 Kick-Off Digital Humanities Research Network

Sustaining Digital Humanities

Fall 2015 Kick-Off

Tuesday, September 8, 2015
4:00pm - 6:00pm
Memorial Library Commons, Room 460

Our first meeting of the semester will be an informal opportunity to catch up with familiar faces, welcome new members to the group, and talk about what we want DHRN to look like this year. Our theme for 2015-16 is “Sustaining Digital Humanities,” so our guiding question for discussion will be: what would it look like to have a sustainable digital humanities presence on the UW-Madison campus? If you’re curious about the history behind this question, check out pages 36-37 of this 2014 report that treats UW-Madison as a case study in the particular challenges of maintaining a DH community on a decentralized campus.
 
About Borghesi-Mellon Workshop Digital Humanities Research Network