Humanities Without Boundaries

The 2013-2014 academic year promises exciting lectures in our Humanities Without Boundaries series.

Past Events

Canceled: Khalil Gibran Muhammad

Canceled: Khalil Gibran Muhammad

Director, The New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

The Mismeasure of Crime: How Numbers Lie About Race Thursday, April 3, 2014 @ 7:30pm Madison Central Public Library, 201 W. Mifflin Street

Dr. Muhammad's talk, "The Mismeasure of Crime: How Numbers Lie About Race," for April 3 at the Madison Public Library has been canceled. Dr. Muhammad's visit will be rescheduled to a fall 2014 date.

Alice Waters

Alice Waters

Chef, Activist, Author and Restaurateur

An Evening with Alice Waters Thursday, March 27, 2014 @ 7:30pm Varsity Hall at Union South

Alice Waters has been transforming the way Americans think about food since opening Chez Panisse Restaurant in 1971. A pioneer of the movement towards local and sustainable eating, cooking, shopping, and farming, Waters views food as a powerful vehicle for social change. Her Edible Schoolyard serves as a model public education program and the starting point for an initiative to integrate gardening experience and a nutritious daily lunch into the curriculum of public schools across the country.

Co-sponsored by the Distinguished Lecture Series. Directions, accessibility, and parking for Union South.

Peter Szendy

Peter Szendy

Professor of Philosophy, University of Nanterre

On Cosmetics and Cosmopolitics Thursday, February 27, 2014 @ 7:30pm Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, L160

"Humanity as such (...) has no enemy, at least on this planet," wrote Carl Schmitt. A sentence that echoes in a way Kant's assertion at the end of his Anthropology, when he writes that we cannot characterize mankind "because we have no knowledge of non-terrestrial rational beings". Reading Kant and Carl Schmitt, we will endeavour to rethink for today the old and devalued concept of cosmopolitanism. And we will try to understand how, when politics extends to outer space, "the sensible" (to borrow Jacques Rancière's term) is distributed or redistributed on a global scale, becoming the object of a new nomos of the earth. When cosmopolitics thus have a direct effect on what we can see or hear, we are confronted with what could be called cosmetopolitics.
 
Peter Szendy is Professor of philosophy at the University of Paris Ouest Nanterre and musicological advisor for the concert programs at the Cité de la musique. He has also taught in the Music Department at the University of Strasbourg from 1998 to 2005 and was Visiting Fellow in the Council of Humanities at Princeton University. He has been the senior editor of the journal and book series published by Ircam. He is the author of: A Coups de points. La ponctuation comme expérience (Éditions de Minuit, 2013, forthcoming) ; L’Apocalypse-cinéma. 2012 et autres fins du monde (Capricci, 2012); Kant in the Land of Extraterrestrials. Cosmopolitical Philosofictions (translated by Will Bishop, Fordham University Press, 2013); Hits: Philosophy in the Jukebox (translated by Will Bishop, Fordham University Press, 2012); Sur écoute. Esthétique de l’espionnage (Éditions de Minuit, 2007); Prophecies of Leviathan: Reading Past Melville (translated by Gil Anidjar, Fordham University Press, 2009); Membres fantômes. Des corps musiciens (Éditions de Minuit, 2002); Listen: A History of Our Ears (translated by Charlotte Mandell, foreword by Jean-Luc Nancy, Fordham University Press, 2007).
 
Directions, parking, and accessibility information for the Conrad A. Elvehjem Building.
Orhan Pamuk

Orhan Pamuk

Nobel Prize-Winning Author

Identifying With Others: Novels and Politics Today Monday, December 2, 2013 @ 7:30pm Varsity Hall at Union South

Winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature, Orhan Pamuk writes fiction and nonfiction that invite dialogue and reflection on history and modernity, on national and global identities, and on gender and its politics. He is the author of eight novels, the memoir Istanbul, and three works of nonfiction. His work has been translated from the original Turkish into over 60 languages. In 2012 he opened The Museum of Innocence in Istanbul, a companion project to his novel of the same name.

Orhan Pamuk's visit is part of the Great World Texts Program at the Center for the Humanities.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the UW Distinguished Lecture Series.

Directions, accessibility, and parking for Union South.

Photo Credit: Spencer Platt

Robert Storr

Robert Storr

Dean and Professor of Painting, Yale School of Art

Mr. & Ms. Inside/Outside: Institutional Critique from Within Institutions Friday, October 25, 2013 @ 7:30pm Lecture Hall, Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, 227 State Street

Robert Storr is Professor of painting/printmaking and Dean of the School of Art at Yale University. He was Curator and then Senior Curator in the Department of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, from 1990 to 2002, where he organized monographic exhibitions on Chuck Close, Elizabeth Murray, Gerhard Richter, Max Beckmann, Tony Smith, and Robert Ryman, as well as many group shows starting with “Dislocations.”  In addition, Storr coordinated the Projects series from 1990 to 2000. In 2002, he was named the first Rosalie Solow Professor of Modern Art at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University a position he held until 2006. He was the Director of the 2007 Venice Biennale, the first American born curator to be named to that post, and from 2005 to 2011 he was Consulting Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. He has been a contributing editor at Art in America since 1981 and writes frequently for Artforum, Parkett, Art Press (Paris), and Frieze (London) and Corriere della Serra (Milan.) He has written numerous catalogs, articles, and books, including Philip Guston (New York, 1986), Cage: 6 Paintings by Gerhard Richter (2009,) “’September’ a History Painting by Gerhard Richter (2010) and the forthcoming Intimate Geometries: The Work and Life of Louise Bourgeois.

MMoCA's lecture hall will open at 7 pm for general seating. 

Directions, parking, and accessibility information for the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art.

Photo caption: Robert Storr. Photograph by Herbert Lotz.

Jill Lepore

Jill Lepore

David Woods Kemper '41 Professor of American History, Harvard University; Staff Writer at The New Yorker

Jane Franklin's Spectacles: Or, the Education of Benjamin Franklin's Sister Thursday, October 24, 2013 @ 7:30pm Conrad A. Elvehjem Building, L160

Benjamin Franklin famously wrote the story of his life, the story of a printer's apprentice who runs away to become a statesman and a scientist. In this illustration lecture, Lepore tells the story of Franklin's long-forgotten sister, Jane.

Jill Lepore is the David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History at Harvard University. In 2011, she was named a Harvard College Professor, for distinction in undergraduate teaching. Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin, her biography of Benjamin Franklin's sister, will be published in October. Her earlier books include The Mansion of Happiness, shortlisted for the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction; New York Burning, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and The Name of War, winner of the Bancroft Prize. She is also a staff writer at The New Yorker

Directions, parking, and accessibility information for the Conrad A. Elvehjem Building.